1. The Ethics of Ambiguity

    Simone de Beauvoir

    1. Ebooks make great gifts! Purchase this ebook as a gift and you can:
      • Personalize it: Include a message along with your gift.
      • Schedule it: Email your gift and set an auto-deliver date so it arrives at just the right time.
        OR
      • Hand-deliver it: Use the print option during checkout to give this ebook the old-fashioned way. (Pro tip: perfect for stocking stuffers!)
      Select a participating retailer:
    In de Beauvoir’s second major essay, the renowned French philosopher illustrates the ethics of Existentialism by outlining a series of “ways of being”

    In this classic introduction to Existentialist thought, French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity simultaneously pays homage to and grapples with her French contemporaries, philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, by arguing that the freedoms in Existentialism carry with them certain ethical responsibilities. While contemplating Nihilism, Surrealism, Existentialism, Objectivity, and human values, The Ethics of Ambiguity is a thorough examination of existence and what it means to human life.

    To do this, de Beauvoir outlines a series of “ways of being” (the adventurer, the passionate person, the lover, the artist, and the intellectual), each of which overcomes the former’s deficiencies, and therefore can live up to the responsibilities of freedom. Ultimately, de Beauvoir argues that in order to achieve true freedom, one must battle against the choices and activities of those who suppress it.
  2. Pub Date
    12/20/2011
    Publisher
    Philosophical Library
    ISBN13
    9781453228487
    Format
    Ebook

Community reviews

Good Reads

About the author

Simone de Beauvoir

French Existentialist philosopher, intellectual, and social theorist Simone de Beauvoir (1908–1986) was best known for her writings on Existentialist ethics and feminist Existentialism, as well as for her infamous polyamorous relationship with fellow French Existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre.