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  • Tracks by Robyn Davidson
    The incredible true story of one woman’s solo adventure across the Australian outback, accompanied by her faithful dog and four unpredictable camels

    For Robyn Davidson, one of these moments comes at age twenty-seven in Alice Springs, a dodgy town at the frontier of the vast Australian desert. Davidson is intent on walking the 1,700 miles of desolate landscape between Alice Springs and the Indian Ocean, a personal pilgrimage with her dog—and four camels. Tracks is the beautifully written, compelling true story of the author’s journey and the love/hate relationships she develops along the way: with the Red Centre of Australia; with aboriginal culture; with a handsome photographer; and especially with her lovable and cranky camels, Bub, Dookie, Goliath, and Zeleika.

    Adapted into a critically acclaimed film starring Mia Wasikowska and Adam Driver, Tracks is an unforgettable story that proves that anything is possible. Perfect for fans of Cheryl Strayed’s Wild.

  • West with the Night by Beryl Markham

    West with the Night

    Beryl Markham

    The classic memoir of Africa, aviation, and adventure—the inspiration for Paula McLain’s Circling the Sun and “a bloody wonderful book” (Ernest Hemingway).

    Beryl Markham’s life story is a true epic. Not only did she set records and break barriers as a pilot, she shattered societal expectations, threw herself into torrid love affairs, survived desperate crash landings—and chronicled everything. A contemporary of Karen Blixen (better known as Isak Dinesen, the author of Out of Africa), Markham left an enduring memoir that soars with astounding candor and shimmering insights.

    A rebel from a young age, the British-born Markham was raised in Kenya’s unforgiving farmlands. She trained as a bush pilot at a time when most Africans had never seen a plane. In 1936, she accepted the ultimate challenge: to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west, a feat that fellow female aviator Amelia Earhart had completed in reverse just a few years before. Markham’s successes and her failures—and her deep, lifelong love of the “soul of Africa”—are all told here with wrenching honesty and agile wit.

    Hailed as “one of the greatest adventure books of all time” by Newsweek and “the sort of book that makes you think human beings can do anything” by the New York Times, West with the Night remains a powerful testament to one of the iconic lives of the twentieth century.
  • If Nuns Ruled the World by Jo Piazza

    If Nuns Ruled the World

    Jo Piazza

    “Fascinating profiles” of remarkable nuns, from an eighty-three-year-old Ironman champion to a crusader against human trafficking (Daily News [New York]).

    “In an age of villainy, war and inequality, it makes sense that we need superheroes,” writes Nicholas Kristof of The New York Times. “And after trying Superman, Batman and Spider-Man, we may have found the best superheroes yet: Nuns.”

    In If Nuns Ruled the World, veteran reporter Jo Piazza overthrows the popular perception of nuns as killjoy schoolmarms, instead revealing them as the most vigorous catalysts of change in an otherwise repressive society.

    Meet Sister Simone Campbell, who traversed the United States challenging a Congressional budget that threatened to severely undermine the well-being of poor Americans; Sister Megan Rice, who is willing to spend the rest of her life in prison if it helps eliminate nuclear weapons; and the inimitable Sister Jeannine Gramick, who is fighting for acceptance of gays and lesbians in the Catholic Church.

    During a time when American nuns are often under attack from the very institution to which they devote their lives—and the values of the institution itself are hotly debated—these sisters offer thought-provoking and inspiring stories. As the Daily Beast put it, “Anybody looking to argue there is a place for Catholicism in the modern world should just stand on a street corner handing out Piazza’s book.”
  • A Woman of Uncertain Character by Clancy Sigal

    A Woman of Uncertain Character

    Clancy Sigal

    This tale of a Russian immigrant is a “gripping and gritty memoir [and] a eulogy for a combative, self-conscious, often violent American working class” (Los Angeles Times).
    Jennie Persily, with her fiery red hair, buxom figure, and bohemian spirit, is a strong-willed fighter for justice and a passionate lover. A Russian-Jewish émigré who organizes unions in the sweatshops and on the mean streets of Chicago during the thirties and forties, Jennie frequently brings her son—the book’s author, Clancy Sigal—along to rallies and on dangerous missions, often eluding union-busting hit men.
    As unsentimental, intelligent, and brazen as its subject, A Woman of Uncertain Character is a candid look into a childhood shaped by a feverishly brave, sexually open, and very complex mother. Sigal gains a deep, satisfying understanding of the woman who made him, and the world that made her.
  • Inside of Time by Ruth Gruber

    Inside of Time

    Ruth Gruber

    The unforgettable story of Ruth Gruber’s rugged travels through Alaska and years spent helping refugees escape to Israel in the nation’s turbulent early days.

    Drawing from hundreds of notebooks accumulated throughout her career, Gruber’s breathtaking memoir spans some of the most significant events of the twentieth century, covering the years 1941 to 1952. She details her eighteen months spent surveying Alaska on behalf of the United States government, her role assisting Holocaust refugees’ emigration from war-torn Europe, and her relationships with some of the most important figures of the era, including Eleanor Roosevelt and Golda Meir.
    Gruber describes these eleven years of her inspiring life with clarity and insight, providing an extraordinary inside look at some of the twentieth century’s turning points.
  • The Gentle Tamers by Dee Brown

    The Gentle Tamers

    Dee Brown

    A fascinating history of women on America’s western frontier by the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

    Popular culture has taught us to picture the Old West as a land of men, whether it’s the lone hero on horseback or crowds of card players in a rough-and-tumble saloon. But the taming of the frontier involved plenty of women, too—and this book tells their stories.

    At first, female pioneers were indeed rare—when the town of Denver was founded in 1859, there were only five women among a population of almost a thousand. But the adventurers arrived, slowly but surely. There was Frances Grummond, a sheltered Southern girl who married a Yankee and traveled with him out west, only to lose him in a massacre. Esther Morris, a dignified middle-aged lady, held a tea party in South Pass City, Wyoming, that would play a role in the long, slow battle for women’s suffrage. Josephine Meeker, an Oberlin College graduate, was determined to educate the Colorado Indians—but was captured by the Ute. And young Virginia Reed, only thirteen, set out for California as part of a group that would become known as the Donner Party.

    With tales of notables such as Elizabeth Custer, Carry Nation, and Lola Montez, this social history touches upon many familiar topics—from the early Mormons to the gold rush to the dawn of the railroads—with a new perspective. This enlightening and entertaining book goes beyond characters like Calamity Jane to reveal the true diversity of the great western migration of the nineteenth century.
    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
  • Vietnam by Mary McCarthy
    Hailed as “the most provocative and disturbing analytical indictment . . . of America’s role in Vietnam” by the New York Times, this is Mary McCarthy’s riveting account of her journeys to Saigon and Hanoi
    In 1967, the editor of the New York Review of Books sent Mary McCarthy to Vietnam. In this daring and incisive account, McCarthy brings her critical thinking and novelist’s eye to one of the most unpopular wars in our nation’s history.
    Outraged over America’s role in the Vietnam War, McCarthy arrived in Saigon with her own preconceived notions. Her time there did little to alter those beliefs. Focusing on the moral consequences—“the worst thing that could happen to our country would be to win this war”—McCarthy provides firsthand reports from the front line. She describes visits to villages built for Vietnamese refugees torn between the terror that Americans would stay and the fear that they would go.
    From its coverage of the daily horrors of war to notes on the logistical challenge of bringing 494,000 soldiers home, this is a timely and timeless work from one of America’s most outspoken and respected critics.
    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author’s estate.
  • Goddess by Anthony Summers
    New York Times Bestseller: The definitive biography based on over six hundred interviews with people who knew Marilyn Monroe both professionally and intimately.

    Marilyn Monroe, born in obscurity and deprivation, became an actress and legend of the twentieth century, romantically linked to famous men from Joe DiMaggio to Arthur Miller to John F. Kennedy. But her tragic death at a young age, under suspicious circumstances, left behind a mystery that remains unsolved to this day.

    Anthony Summers interviewed more than six hundred people, laying bare the truths—sometimes funny, often sad—about this brilliant, troubled woman. The first to gain access to the files of Monroe’s last psychiatrist, Summers uses the documents to explain her tangled psyche and her dangerous addiction to medications. He establishes, after years of mere rumor, that President Kennedy and his brother Robert were both intimately involved with Monroe in life—and in covering up the circumstances of her death.

    Written by a Pulitzer Prize nominee who has authored works on JFK, J. Edgar Hoover, and the 9/11 attacks, this investigation of an iconic star’s brief life and early death is “remarkable. . . . The ghost of Marilyn Monroe cries out in these pages” (The New York Times).
  • Moving Beyond Words by Gloria Steinem

    Moving Beyond Words

    Gloria Steinem

    Steinem’s career-spanning collection of essays—each one a book in itself—re-imagine everything from the masculinization of wealth to Freudian thought and aging
    With cool humor and rich intellect, Gloria Steinem strips bare our social constructions of gender and race, explaining just how limiting these invented cultural identities can be. In the first of six sections, Steinem imagines how our understanding of human psychology would be different in a witty reversal: What if Freud had been a woman who inflicted biological inferiority on men (think “womb envy”)? In other essays, the author presents positive examples of people who turn stereotypes on their heads, from a female bodybuilder to Mahatma Gandhi, whose followers absorbed his wisdom that change starts at the bottom. And in some of the most moving pieces, Steinem reveals something of her own complicated history as a writer, woman, and citizen of the world.
  • Famous for 15 Minutes by Ultra Violet

    Famous for 15 Minutes

    Ultra Violet

    One of Andy Warhol’s superstars recalls the birth of an art movement—and the death of an icon

    In this audacious tell-all memoir, Ultra Violet, born Isabelle Collin Dufresne, relives her years with Andy Warhol at the Factory and all of the madness that accompanied the sometimes-violent delivery of pop art.

    Starting with her botched seduction of the “shy, near-blind, bald, gay albino” from Pittsburgh, Ultra Violet installs herself in Warhol’s world, becoming his muse for years to come. But she does more than just inspire; she also watches, listens, and remembers, revealing herself to be an ideal tour guide to the “assembly line for art, sex, drugs, and film” that is the Factory. Famous for 15 Minutes drips with juicy details about celebrities and cultural figures in vignettes filled with surreptitious cocaine spoons, shameless sex, and insights into perhaps the most recognizable but least intimately known artist in the world.

    Beyond the legendary artist himself are the throngs of Factory “regulars”—Billy Name, Baby Jane Holzer, Brigid Polk—and the more transient celebrities who make appearances—Bob Dylan, Jane Fonda, Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon.

    Delightfully bizarre and always entertaining, filled with colorful scenes and larger-than-life personalities, this dishy page-turner is shot through with the author’s vivid imagery and piercing observations of a cultural idol and his eclectic, voyeuristic, altogether riveting world.
  • Saturday's Child by Robin Morgan

    Saturday's Child

    Robin Morgan

    An amazing trajectory: From child star to prize-winning writer to feminist icon

    Robin Morgan is famous as a bestselling author of nonfiction, a prize-winning poet, and a founder and leader of contemporary feminism. Before all of that, though, she was a working child actor. From the age of two, “Saturday’s child had to work for a living.” She had her own radio show on New York’s WOR, Little Robin Morgan, by the time she was four; starred during the Golden Age of television in TV’s Mama from ages seven to fourteen; and was named the Ideal American Girl when she was twelve. In Saturday’s Child, she writes for the first time about her working youth, her battles to break away from show business and from her mother, her search for her absent, abandoning father, her entrance into the literary world, and the development of her politics, relationships, and writing.

    Morgan describes her tumultuous but successful life with startling honesty: her flight from child stardom into literature, her twenty-year marriage to a bisexual man, her joyful motherhood, her lovers, both male and female, her actions as a “temporary terrorist” on the left during the 1970s, and her travels and experiences in the global women’s movement. She writes about compiling and editing the famous anthologies Sisterhood Is Powerful and Sisterhood Is Global and later cofounding with Simone de Beauvoir the Sisterhood Is Global Institute. Saturday’s Child follows this “Ideal American Girl” on her path to becoming the feminist icon she is today.

    Epic in scope, witty, and bravely insightful, this is the tale of half of humanity rising up and demanding its rights, told through the intensely personal story of one remarkable woman.
  • The Trials of Radclyffe Hall by Diana Souhami

    The Trials of Radclyffe Hall

    Diana Souhami

    Diana Souhami’s Lambda Award–winning biography is a fascinating look at one of the twentieth century’s most intriguing lesbian literary figures

    Born in 1880, Marguerite Radclyffe-Hall was a young unwanted child when her parents put an end to their tempestuous marriage by filing for divorce. She had already made tentative forays into lesbian love when her father died, leaving her an heiress at eighteen. Her income assured, Hall moved out of her mother’s house, renamed herself John in honor of her great-great-grandfather, and divided her time among hunting, traveling, and pursuing women. She began to write—songs, poetry, prose, and short stories—and achieved success as a novelist, but it was with the publication of The Well of Loneliness in 1928 that Radclyffe Hall became an internationally known figure. Dubbed the “bible of lesbianism,” the book caused a scandal on both sides of the Atlantic. Though moralistic in tone, because of its subject matter it was tried as obscene in America and in the United Kingdom, where it was censored under the Obscene Publications Act.

    The Trials of Radclyffe Hall is a fascinating, no-holds-barred account of the life of this controversial woman, including her torrid relationship with the married artist Una Troubridge, who was Hall’s devoted partner for twenty-eight years.
  • The Brontës by Juliet Barker

    The Brontës

    Juliet Barker

    In a revised and updated edition, the real story of the Brontë sisters, by distinguished scholar and historian Juliet Barker The story of the tragic Brontë family is familiar to everyone: we all know about the half-mad, repressive father, the drunken, drug-addicted wastrel of a brother, wildly romantic Emily, unrequited Anne, and “poor Charlotte.” Or do we? These stereotypes of the popular imagination are precisely that—imaginary—created by amateur biographers like Elizabeth Gaskell who were primarily novelists and were attracted by the tale of an apparently doomed family of genius. Juliet Barker’s landmark book is the first definitive history of the Brontës. It demolishes the myths, yet provides startling new information that is just as compelling—but true. Based on firsthand research among all the Brontë manuscripts and among contemporary historical documents never before used by Brontë biographers, this book is both scholarly and compulsively readable. The Brontës is a revolutionary picture of the world’s favorite literary family.
  • Kindred Souls by Edna P. Gurewitsch

    Kindred Souls

    Edna P. Gurewitsch

    The poignant and unforgettable true account of the deep, loving friendship between a handsome physician and the former First Lady, as seen on PBS’s The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
    “I love you as I love and have never loved anyone else.” —Eleanor Roosevelt in a letter to Dr. David Gurewitsch, 1955

    She was the most famous and admired woman in America. He was a strikingly handsome doctor, eighteen years her junior. Eleanor Roosevelt first met David Gurewitsch in 1944. He was making a house call to a patient when the door opened to reveal the wife of the president of the United States, who had come to help her sick friend. A year later, Gurewitsch was Mrs. Roosevelt’s personal physician, on his way to becoming the great lady’s dearest companion—a relationship that would endure until Mrs. Roosevelt’s death in 1962. Recounting the details of this remarkable union is an intimately involved chronicler: Gurewitsch’s wife, Edna.

    Kindred Souls is a rare love story—the tale of a friendship between two extraordinary people, based on trust, exchange of confidences, and profound interest in and respect for each other’s work. With perceptiveness, compassion, admiration, and deep affection, the author recalls the final decade and a half of the former First Lady’s exceptional life, from her first encounter with the man who would become Mrs. Gurewitsch’s husband through the blossoming of a unique bond and platonic love.

    Blended into her tender reminiscences are excerpts from the enduring correspondence between Dr. Gurewitsch and the First Lady, and a collection of personal photographs of the Gurewitsch and Roosevelt families. The result is a revealing portrait of one of the twentieth century’s most beloved icons in the last years of her life—a woman whom the author warmly praises as “one of the few people in this world in which greatness and modesty could coexist.”
  • Red Emma Speaks by Alix Kates Shulman

    Red Emma Speaks

    Alix Kates Shulman

    A comprehensive collection of writings and lectures by one of twentieth-century America’s most important political activists, with two essays by editor Alix Kates Shulman, a leader of feminism’s second wave
    Emma Goldman’s fiery speeches and essays made her a household name in the early 1900s. Collected here are the most significant of her writings, supplemented with an essay on Goldman’s feminist politics and a short biography, both by bestselling author Alix Kates Shulman. Including both published and previously unpublished works, Red Emma Speaks is an important historical volume and a fascinating look at the life and times of a major early feminist figure.
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