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    • Hopscotch by Brian Garfield

      Hopscotch

      Brian Garfield

      Edgar Award winner: Bored with retirement, an ex-spy challenges his old agency to a game
      Miles Kendig is one of the CIA’s top deep-cover agents, until an injury ruins him for active duty. Rather than take a desk job, he retires. But the tawdry thrills of civilian life—gambling, drinking, sex—offer none of the pleasures of the intelligence game. Even a Russian agent’s offer to go to work against his old employers seems dull. Without the thrill of unpredictable conflict, Kendig skulks through Paris like the walking dead. To revive himself, he begins writing a tell-all memoir, divulging every secret he accumulated in his long career. Neither CIA nor KGB can afford to have it in print, and so he challenges them both: Until they catch him, a chapter will go to the publisher every week. Kendig’s life is fun again, with survival on the line.

    • A Dram of Poison by Charlotte Armstrong

      A Dram of Poison

      Charlotte Armstrong

      Edgar Award winner: A longtime bachelor finally marries—only to learn the corrosive power of jealousy For fifty-five years, Kenneth Gibson has lived in backwaters. A former army clerk, he makes a quiet living teaching poetry to indifferent undergrads. His life is happily dull until the day he meets Rosemary, a damaged girl whose frailty compels Kenneth to try to make her well. They wed, and as Rosemary recovers from her depression, Gibson falls in love, transforming his world. But his wife will never love him. She is smitten with their landlord, a dashing young chemical engineer named Paul. Gibson wants to let her go, but he cannot bear to be parted with the first love he has ever known. In Paul’s house is a case of poison, and this love triangle can only end in death.

    • The Man Who Would Be F. Scott Fitzgerald by David Handler

      The Man Who Would Be F. Scott Fitzgerald

      David Handler

      Hoagy tries to save a client from the deadly world of high-stakes publishing in this Edgar Award–winning mystery
      Stewart Hoag knows how quickly fame can fade. The same critics who adored his first novel used his second for target practice, ending his literary career once and for all. To keep his basset hound fed, Hoagy ghostwrites memoirs for the rich, famous, and self-destructive. His newest subject reminds him all too much of himself. By the age of twenty, Cam Noyes is already being hailed as the next F. Scott Fitzgerald. Though he’s only published one book, Cam runs with the big boys: dating artists, trashing restaurants, and ending every night in a haze of tequila and cocaine. So glamorous is his lifestyle that he’s having trouble starting his second novel, forcing his agent to hire Hoagy to get the little genius working on a memoir instead. As Hoagy digs into the kid’s life story, he learns that New York publishing is even more cutthroat than he thought.
    • Penance by David Housewright
      Edgar Award winner: A Minneapolis PI investigates the murder of the man who killed his wife.

      Holland Taylor is comfortable in interrogation rooms. For years, the cold dark cells of the Minneapolis homicide squad were his turf, and with the help of his partner, he wrung confessions out of countless killers. But that was long ago. Tonight Taylor’s on the other side of the desk. Tonight he’s the suspect.

      Taylor’s career in the department ended after his wife and daughter were killed in a drunk driving accident. The culprit, John Brown, was sentenced to a measly six years for vehicular manslaughter, and Taylor vowed bloody vengeance in front of open court. After a few months of freedom, Brown is shot dead, and Taylor, now a private investigator, is called in as the obvious suspect. He didn’t kill John Brown, but he’ll find out who did—even if it means tearing Minneapolis apart from the inside out.
    • Carolina Skeletons by David Stout

      Carolina Skeletons

      David Stout

      Edgar Award winner: Based on true events, a chilling tale of murder and injustice in the Jim Crow South
      As a fourteen-year-old black boy living in 1940s South Carolina, Linus Bragg should know better than to follow the two bicycling white girls. But something about Sue Ellen and Cindy Lou compels him. Maybe it’s the way Cindy Lou speaks to him, or how Sue Ellen sits on her bike. Whatever the reason, he follows the girls into the woods. It’s the worst mistake he ever makes. When he comes into the clearing, both girls are dead and young Linus is the natural suspect. Forty years later, a nephew of Linus’s returns to South Carolina, curious about this dark moment in his family’s past. To find the fourth person who visited the clearing that day means reopening a sinister chapter of the small town’s history, which certain evil men had thought closed forever.
      Carolina Skeletons is based on the 1944 case of George Stinney Jr., who, at the age of fourteen, became the youngest person executed in the United States during the twentieth century. After a hastily scheduled hearing only a few hours long, the jury quickly charged him with a double murder. He was put to death three months later.
      A haunting journey into America’s shameful past, Carolina Skeletons deftly explores how history’s skeletons rarely stay hidden forever.

    • The Bait by Dorothy Uhnak

      The Bait

      Dorothy Uhnak

      In this Edgar Award–winning debut novel, a dedicated cop becomes the ultimate prey when a serial killer gets out on bail
      It begins when New York Police Department Detective Second-Grade Christie Opara arrests a man on the subway for indecent exposure. Within hours, Murray Rogoff, a burly giant, his crazed stare concealed behind thick glasses, is out on bail. Soon after, the body of a young dancer is found stashed behind the stairway of a Bronx apartment building. The girl was brutally raped and strangled, and a clue links her with two previous murders. The killer takes a signature trophy: a hacked-off lock of the victim’s hair. A few days later, Christie starts to get strange, late-night phone calls. Although Rogoff never spoke when he was in lock-up, the detective’s instincts tell her that Rogoff’s the serial killer they’re hunting. With the reluctant approval of her boss, Assistant District Attorney Casey Reardon, Christie prepares to become the bait of a deadly psychopath.This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy Uhnak including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • The Blue Edge of Midnight by Jonathon King

      The Blue Edge of Midnight

      Jonathon King

      The Edgar Award–winning debut of the bestselling Max Freeman mystery series: A tormented ex-cop’s mission to solve a grisly murder and earn redemption for his dark past

      After a shootout during a convenience store holdup led to the accidental death of a twelve-year-old, Max Freeman left behind the Philadelphia police department for a life in exile in the Florida Everglades. Since then, he has lived in seclusion, haunted by guilt, with the humid night and the nocturnal predators of the swamp as his only company. But everything changes when Freeman discovers a young girl’s body floating in the muddy waters and becomes the prime suspect for her murder. To prove his innocence, Freeman must uncover the real murderer—and confront his own tortured soul—before it’s too late. This ebook contains an illustrated biography of the author featuring never-before-seen photos.
    • The Anderson Tapes by Lawrence Sanders

      The Anderson Tapes

      Lawrence Sanders

      The explosive Edgar Award–winning debut novel—told entirely through surveillance recordings, eyewitness reports, and other “official” documents—by New York Times bestselling author Lawrence Sanders

      New York City. Summer 1968.Newly sprung from prison, professional burglar John Anderson is preparing for the biggest heist of his criminal career. The mark is a Manhattan luxury apartment building with the tony address of 535 East Seventy-Third Street. Enlisting a crew of scouts, con artists, and a getaway driver, Anderson orchestrates what he believes to be a foolproof plan. To pull off the big score, he needs one last thing: the permission of the local mafia, who expect a piece of the action. But no one inside Anderson’s operation knows that the police have recorded their conversations. The New York Police Department has hatched a plot of its own—but even its task force may not be enough to stop such a cunningly planned robbery.
    • A Case of Need by Michael Crichton

      A Case of Need

      Michael Crichton

      The death of a doctor’s daughter may be malpractice—or murder—in this novel by a #1 New York Timesbestselling author: “I loved it” (Stephen King).

      In the tightly knit world of Boston medicine, the Randall family reigns supreme. When heart surgeon J. D. Randall’s teenage daughter dies during a botched abortion, the medical community threatens to explode. Was it malpractice? A violation of the Hippocratic Oath? Or was Karen Randall murdered in cold blood?

      The natural suspect is Arthur Lee, a brilliant surgeon and known abortionist, who has been carrying out the illegal procedure with the help of pathologist John Berry. After Karen dies, Lee is thrown in jail on a murder charge, and only Berry can prove his friend wasn’t the one who wielded the scalpel. Behind this gruesome death, Berry will uncover a secret that would shock even the most hardened pathologist.

      An Edgar Award–winning novel by the author of such blockbusters as The Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park—and creator of the long-running NBC drama ER—A Case of Need is a “superb” medical-thriller mystery (Los Angeles Times).

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Michael Crichton including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Slow Motion Riot by Peter Blauner

      Slow Motion Riot

      Peter Blauner

      In Peter Blauner’s Edgar Award–winning first novel, a New York probation officer locks horns with a deadly young drug dealer
      As a probation officer in a city plagued by drugs, murders, and corruption, Steven Baum supervises marginal criminals—not dangerous enough for prison, but too damaged to go totally free. He watches them, keeps them in line, and once in a long while, helps one improve his life. The job is a vicious grind, but Steven is good at it, and he is about to be rewarded with a transfer to active duty. But first he has to deal with Darryl King. A small-time dealer with big aspirations, Darryl is the kind of thug who makes probation officers want to quit. Although the boy terrifies him, Steven holds out hope for helping him turn his life around. What he doesn’t know is that Darryl is a cop-killer—and his troubles have only just begun. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Peter Blauner including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
    • The Alvarez Journal by Rex Burns

      The Alvarez Journal

      Rex Burns

      Winner of the Edgar Award: A letter tips off a Denver narcotics detective to a colossal smuggling ring Once, Denver’s small-time pushers sold nothing harder than dime bags of bad California grass. But in the last year, heroin has appeared on the streets of the Mile High City, and the police department has responded by forming a narcotics division. Detective Gabe Wager and his rookie partner spend their nights trailing dealers, making buys, and acquiring informants, in the hope that a small arrest could turn into a major case. After months picking up scraps, a stray piece of information is about to put Wager on to the biggest bust of his career. A letter from the Seattle DEA says that an informant has named Denver’s Rare Thing Import Shop as a front for nearly a thousand pounds a week of smuggled marijuana. The case could make Wager’s career—if the smugglers don’t kill him first.
    • Strike Three You're Dead by R. D. Rosen

      Strike Three You're Dead

      R. D. Rosen

      A slugger struggles with an empty ballpark and a murdered teammate in this Edgar Award–winning mystery.
      The Providence Jewels, an American League expansion team, have been taking a beating all season. Worse, relief pitcher Rudy Furth has just suffered a beating of a more lethal kind—and been left to die in the clubhouse whirlpool among whispers of mob corruption and violently lovesick fans. When the police investigation stalls, veteran Providence center fielder Harvey Blissberg, who knew Furth as well as anyone, decides to play detective. While trying to keep his eye on the ball, and his head above water with the spunky, beautiful sports newscaster Mickey Slavin, Blissberg quietly stalks Furth’s killer through major-league locker rooms and the dark streets of Rhode Island’s capital city. Lots of ballplayers keep their batting averages above .300—but how many have chased a murderer at the same time?
    • A Dark-Adapted Eye by Ruth Rendell

      A Dark-Adapted Eye

      Ruth Rendell

      A woman investigates the shocking secrets that brought down her once proud family in this suspenseful Edgar Award winner from a New York Times–bestselling author.

      Faith Severn has never understood why the willful matriarch of her high-society family, aunt Vera Hillyard, snapped and murdered her own beloved sister. But long after Vera is condemned to hang, a journalist’s startling discoveries allow Faith to perceive her family’s story in a new light.

      Set in post–World War II Britain, A Dark-Adapted Eye is both a gripping mystery and a harrowing psychological portrait of a complex woman at the head of a troubled family. Called “a rich, beautifully crafted novel” by P. D. James, Time magazine has described its author as “the best mystery writer in the English-speaking world.”
    • A Cold Red Sunrise by Stuart M. Kaminsky

      A Cold Red Sunrise

      Stuart M. Kaminsky

      Edgar Award winner: In trouble with the KGB, Rostnikov is sent to investigate a death in Siberia
      After three decades serving with the Moscow police, Porfiry Rostnikov is back at the bottom. When forced to choose between the law and the party line, he fights for justice—a disturbing preference that has won him no friends at the Kremlin. Now his enemies in the KGB have transferred him to the lowest rungs of Moscow law enforcement, a backwater department assigned with only the most token murders. But, peculiarly, Rostnikov’s newest assignment is no token at all. While in Siberia investigating the death of a dissident’s daughter, a corrupt commissar is stabbed through the eye with an icicle. Finding his killer should be a top priority, yet the KGB hands it off to the disgraced detective. Someone doesn’t want this murder solved, and there are people in Moscow who may be plotting to ensure Rostnikov does not live to see the end of this Siberian winter.
    • The Hog Murders by William L. DeAndrea

      The Hog Murders

      William L. DeAndrea

      In the Edgar Award–winning first title of the Niccolo Benedetti series, the celebrated detective hunts a serial killer who is terrorizing a small town
      In the upstate New York town of Sparta, six people die in three weeks. At first the incidents seem accidental: A highway sign drops onto a car full of teenage girls, an old man falls down a set of stairs, and a boy is struck by a sheet of ice that had been building on his garage. But after each case a note turns up. Someone called “Hog” claims responsibility for each death, and taunts the police to catch him before he strikes again. The deaths have everybody talking, and the local police department is eventually forced to share the case with famous Italian detective Niccolo Benedetti and his protégé, would-be cop turned private investigator Ron Gresham. A painter, ladies’ man, and rule-bending genius, Benedetti views every case as a chance to probe the nature of evil. And with his “analyze and imagine” method, he’ll pursue the killer both to stop him and to study him.
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    • Old Bones by Aaron Elkins

      Old Bones

      Aaron Elkins

      An Edgar Award–winning mystery featuring the forensic anthropologist hailed as “a likable, down-to-earth, cerebral sleuth”—from the author of Switcheroo (Chicago Tribune).

      “With the roar of thunder and the speed of a galloping horse comes the tide to Mont St. Michel,” goes the old nursery song. So when the aged patriarch of the du Rocher family falls victim to the perilous tide, even the old man’s family accepts the verdict of accidental drowning.

      But too quickly, this “accident” is followed by a bizarre discovery in the ancient du Rocher chateau: a human skeleton, wrapped in butcher paper, beneath the old stone flooring. Professor Gideon Oliver, lecturing on forensic anthropology at nearby St. Malo, is asked to examine the bones. He quickly demonstrates why he is known as the “Skeleton Detective,” providing the police with forensic details that lead them to conclude that these are the remains of a Nazi officer believed to have been murdered in the area during the Occupation. Or are they? Gideon himself has his doubts. Then, when another of the current du Rochers dies—this time via cyanide poisoning—his doubts solidify into a single certainty: Someone wants old secrets to stay buried . . . and is perfectly willing to eradicate the meddlesome American to make that happen.

      Voted one of the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association’s 100 Favorite Mysteries of the 20th Century, and featuring “a thrilling final scene,” Old Bones will captivate fans of Kathy Reichs and Tess Gerritsen as well as readers of Aaron Elkins’s popular Alix London series (Publishers Weekly).

    • No One Rides for Free by Larry Beinhart

      No One Rides for Free

      Larry Beinhart

      While chasing a white-collar snitch, a New York PI finds himself embroiled in a murderous conspiracy reaching deep into the federal government in this Edgar Award–winning mystery In his short time as partner at a prestigious Wall Street law firm, Edgar Wood manages to steal $8 million. To avoid the hell of three years in prison, Wood turns witness for the Securities and Exchange Commission, whose mysterious investigation rankles the top brass at Wood’s old firm. Desperate to learn what Wood’s telling the feds, the remaining partners hire Tony Cassella, a private investigator whose past includes a year or so at Yale University’s law school, a stint as a corrections officer, and a cocaine addiction. Though he’s recently gotten his life back on track, Cassella is drawn to trouble, and can imagine no greater thrill than tangling with the SEC. When Wood—under witness protection—is killed in a mugging, Cassella smells conspiracy. His hunt for the real crooks will leave no one safe, no matter how blue their blood. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Larry Beinhart including rare images from the author’s personal collection.
    • The Pale Betrayer by Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      The Pale Betrayer

      Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      Edgar Award Finalist: Grand Master of crime fiction Dorothy Salisbury Davis delivers a thrilling tale of Cold War–era espionage and murder.
      One afternoon in Manhattan’s Washington Square Park, Eric Mather is approached by two men, Tom and Jerry, with a business proposal: a bit of light espionage that may be considered treason. Eric’s friend and colleague, physics professor Peter Bradley, is on his way back from an international conference in Athens. In his briefcase is a roll of film that must be confiscated to keep the Cold War from turning hot. Bradley won’t miss this little roll of film, they say, and nobody will get hurt.
      When Bradley is stabbed to death in an apartment on East Tenth Street, Eric realizes he has made a bargain with the wrong people. Desperate to make up for betraying his friend, he ventures into a shadowy world of danger and intrigue as he sets out to learn everything he can about Tom and Jerry—two foreign agents engaged in an atomic game of cat and mouse.
    • The Old Dick by L. A. Morse

      The Old Dick

      L. A. Morse

      WINNER OF THE EDGAR AWARD FOR BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL.
      ---
      Retired private eye Jake Spanner may have gotten old, but he hasn’t gone soft. When an old gangster Jake put away some forty years ago shows up at his door, it’s time for Jake to grab his hat and Browning automatic and get back to work.

      Old? Sure. Slower to catch his breath? Maybe. But, sharp as a tack and with a lifetime of investigating know-how, Jake Spanner has nothing to lose and everything to prove. Sniffing out leads between Sunset Boulevard and the Hollywood Hills, Jake pulls in old friends to help. The work is hard; it’s gritty. So is Jake. And, with a three quarters of a million dollars ransom at stake, the bad guys don’t stand a chance.

      With THE OLD DICK, author L.A. Morse creates a new kind of hero, one that laughs at death not because he’s too young to understand it, but because it’s right around the corner. It’s time to face it head on and maybe go out swinging.
    • Triangle by Teri White

      Triangle

      Teri White

      In Vietnam, a loner meets a strange man with a knack for murder in this Edgar Award–winning thriller.

      Mac finds Johnny Griffith nearly comatose with shell shock, on the edge of a massacre. When the Vietnamese fighters attack, he just stands there waiting to die, until Mac tells him to run. Together they survive the war—Mac risking his life time and again for this strange, sweet kid who barely knows his own name. By the time they return stateside, they’re inseparable, joined by a bond that no outsider could understand—and which can only end in tragedy.

      When Mac’s gambling habit lands him in debt with the mob, he offers them Johnny, whose obedience makes him a perfect contract assassin. Mac plans the hits, and Johnny pulls the trigger, feeling nothing afterward besides an intense craving for strawberry ice cream. But when Mac loses control of his killing machine, Johnny’s repressed fury will be unleashed on the world.

    • And the Deep Blue Sea by Charles Williams

      And the Deep Blue Sea

      Charles Williams

      Edgar Award Finalist: A sailor stranded in the Pacific Ocean finds there are a million ways to die
      His life in pieces, Harry Goddard buys a thirty-two-foot sloop and sets out to sail the Pacific. He is a thousand miles from anywhere when his craft strikes an unseen object, and begins taking water. For all his desperate efforts, he cannot save her, and Harry is forced into his life raft, to drift without food, water, or shelter from the sun. He is near death when the Leander rescues him. But by the time his trip is over, he’ll wish he’d taken his chances in the open water. A tramp freighter sailing under the Panamanian flag, the Leander is en route to the Philippines when its crew spots Harry and takes him aboard. But as he regains his strength, Harry uncovers a murderous conspiracy that could destroy the ship that saved him.

    • The Gift Shop by Charlotte Armstrong

      The Gift Shop

      Charlotte Armstrong

      Edgar Award Finalist: A dying fraternity brother draws a wealthy playboy into a bizarre conspiracy. Bernie staggers off the airplane from Honolulu, a lei around his neck and blood seeping from the wound in his chest. He stumbles to the terminal gift shop, and demands the cashier point him to a payphone. As his life seeps away, Bernie calls Harry Fairchild, his old fraternity brother. Dying or not, he has a job to do. Harry is a playboy, the scion of an oil-rich family known throughout California. Bernie was in Honolulu working for Harry’s father, and he has a message to give the old man before he expires. Baffled, Harry races to the airport, arriving just as Bernie is being taken to the hospital, where he dies on the operating table. Somehow Harry’s father is mixed up in the murder, and Harry is going to find out how, even if it means risking a knife to his own gut.

    • The Corpse in Oozak's Pond by Charlotte MacLeod

      The Corpse in Oozak's Pond

      Charlotte MacLeod

      Edgar Award Finalist: Secrets surface alongside a waterlogged corpse on Groundhog Day.

      The rural town of Balaclava greets Groundhog Day as an excuse for one last cold-weather fling. The students and faculty of the local agricultural college drink cocoa, throw snowballs, and when the temperature allows, ice skate. But Oozak’s Pond is not quite frozen this year, and as the celebrations reach their peak, the students see someone bobbing through the ice. Long past help, the drowning victim is badly decomposed and dressed in an old-fashioned frock coat with a heavy rock in each pocket.

      First on the scene is Peter Shandy, horticulturalist and—when the college requires it—detective. But solving this nineteenth-century murder mystery will take more than Shandy’s knack for growing rutabagas. Relying on his wife’s expertise in local history, the professor dives headfirst into a gilded-age whodunit that cloaks secrets potent enough to kill.

    • Blood of Paradise by David Corbett

      Blood of Paradise

      David Corbett

      Edgar Award Finalist: In El Salvador, a young American faces his troubled past—and a dangerous present.
      Jude McManus has landed on his feet. Following time in the army, he scored work as an “executive protection specialist” in El Salvador, where he safeguards a hydrologist for good money and gets to surf during his downtime. But this slice of paradise comes with post-civil-war dangers, and distance won’t erase his cruel memories of Chicago. Ten years earlier, his cop father was outed as part of the Laugh Masters, a group of police officers investigated for robbing and brutally beating drug dealers. In the wake of the scandal, the family fell apart, and his father died under suspicious circumstances. When McManus gets a call from Bill Malvasio—one of his dad’s closest friends and an escaped member of the Laugh Masters, now living in El Salvador—the past comes knocking in a big way. Malvasio opens up about what really happened, and seeks help for another member of McManus’s father’s old crew. Is the disgraced ex-cop being straight with McManus? Hidden corruption abounds, and it will take all of McManus’s wits to come away with the truth—and his life—intact.

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    • The Busy Body by Donald E.  Westlake

      The Busy Body

      Donald E. Westlake

      Edgar Award Finalist: A mob boss’s right-hand man must track down a missing cache of heroin. The corpse isn’t anybody special—a low-level drug courier—but it has been so long since the organization’s last grand funeral that Nick Rovito decides to give the departed a big send-off. He pays for a huge church, a procession of Cadillacs, and an ocean of flowers, and enjoys the affair until he learns the dead man is going to his grave wearing the blue suit. Rovito summons Engel, his right-hand man, and tells him to get a shovel. Inside the lining of the blue suit jacket is $250,000 worth of uncut heroin, smuggled back from Baltimore the day the courier died. When Engel’s shovel strikes coffin, he braces himself for the encounter with the dead man. But the coffin is empty, the heroin gone, and Engel has no choice but to track down the missing body or face his boss’s wrath.

    • Red Hook by Gabriel Cohen

      Red Hook

      Gabriel Cohen

      Edgar Award Finalist: In the first novel of the Jack Leightner crime series, the Brooklyn homicide detective investigates a perplexing murder in dangerous terrain: the rundown neighborhood of his youth.
      Unlike the other members of the elite Brooklyn South Homicide Task Force, Detective Jack Leightner prefers his murders baffling. He likes to lose himself in tough cases, and he has just caught a murder that will consume him like no other: an unidentified body, bound execution style, on the banks of the Gowanus Canal. Leightner is finishing his first look at the corpse when he discovers a knife wound and loses his lunch. He has seen a thousand dead bodies, but nothing brings back bad memories like death by knife.
      The victim was a hardworking Dominican man with a family, a job, and no ties to the underworld. Investigating this murder will suck Leightner back into Red Hook, the neighborhood of his youth—now a labyrinth of empty docks and crumbling housing projects. It’s a tough case, but not half as hard as going home.
      Red Hook is the 1st book in the Jack Leightner Crime Novels, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.
    • Clandestine by James Ellroy

      Clandestine

      James Ellroy

      In this Edgar Award finalist by the New York Times–bestselling author of L.A. Confidential, a murder investigation nearly drives a cop to madness.
      Despite the sunshine, high necklines, and demure purity of its silver-screen goddesses, Los Angeles in the 1950s is not a gentle place. Even as a young cop, Freddy Underhill knows this. Patrolling one of L.A.’s roughest districts, he sees the lust, rage, and madness that permeate the city—and stands in wonder and dismay at it all. He covers the beat with his partner Wacky Walker, a World War II veteran with a Medal of Honor, a drinking problem, and a serious obsession with death. When an old flame of Freddy’s is murdered, the investigation takes them deep into the shadiest part of the city, where Freddy will have to embrace the darkness if he wants to emerge with his life.

      From the author of The Black Dahlia, a legendary name in crime fiction called “one of the great American writers of our time” by the Los Angeles Times Book Review, this is a gritty tale of the dark side of postwar America, as well as a riveting mystery filled with “skillful characterization [and] fast-paced action” (Library Journal).

    • Not a Creature Was Stirring by Jane Haddam

      Not a Creature Was Stirring

      Jane Haddam

      Edgar Award Finalist: On the Philadelphia Main Line, a family of crooks plots a blue-blooded murder.
      The Hannaford who made the family fortune called himself a tycoon. The newspapers called him a robber baron. Since the days of Robert Hannaford I, the family has infested Philadelphia society like a disease. The current Hannafords are a clan of embezzlers, gamblers, and fantasy novelists. This Christmas, they have money in their bank accounts, crime in their blood, and murder on their minds. Gregor Demarkian is their reluctant guest. A former FBI agent who quit the agency after his wife’s death, he is invited by the Hannaford patriarch to come for dinner at the family mansion. Demarkain arrives just in time to find his host bludgeoned to death in his study and his investigation will lead him to the Hannafords, a family of cold-blooded killers.
    • Emily Dickinson Is Dead by Jane Langton

      Emily Dickinson Is Dead

      Jane Langton

      Edgar Award Finalist: Murder strikes the Massachusetts hometown of a literary icon, and a scholarly sleuth investigates, in a “remarkable” mystery series (Booklist). Although she spent her life withdrawn from the people of Amherst, Massachusetts, every man, woman, and English professor in this small university town claims ownership of poet Emily Dickinson. They give tours in her house, lay flowers on her grave, and now, as the hundredth anniversary of her death approaches, they organize festivals in her name. Dickinson scholar Owen Kraznik has just been railroaded into organizing the festival when Amherst starts to burn. As the fire consumes a fourteen-story university dormitory, transcendentalist scholar and occasional sleuth Homer Kelly considers that it may have been set on purpose. Two students die in the blaze, but neither was the arsonist’s target. Emily Dickinson wrote countless poems on the nature of mortality, but before Amherst can celebrate her words, death will leap off the page.
    • Deadline by John Dunning

      Deadline

      John Dunning

      Edgar Award Finalist: During his first day at a new job, a veteran journalist is drawn into a strange closed society.
      After years of churning out copy as a newspaper reporter, Dalton Walker still can’t resist a fire. When a circus tent goes up in smoke, seventeen are killed, and one body in particular draws his attention: a little girl, charred beyond recognition. The adult that brought her there must have survived, but no one comes forward to claim the body. Why? It is a strange case, and the more Walker digs, the stranger it becomes. At the same time, his new editor hands him a fluff piece—a profile of something New York City has never seen before: an Amish Rockette. As Walker investigates how a girl who was taught that dancing is a sin could have found her way to Radio City Music Hall, he begins to suspect that her apparent fear of reporters is more than just shyness. Danger surrounds the dancer, who is learning that life on the kickline can be just as perilous as a circus-tent fire.

    • Floater by Joseph Koenig

      A sheriff combs the Everglades for the charming sociopath who killed his ex-wife in this Edgar Award–nominated mystery.
      Years after their marriage collapses, Buck White splurges on Irene’s coffin. She was found floating in a cypress swamp behind a Seminole village, her beauty marred by sadistic violence, a guitar string buried so deep in her neck that it takes two autopsies to dig it out. Sheriff White knows neither the time nor place of death, but the savaged corpse tells him to look for a serial killer: white, under forty, antisocial, and with a fondness for liquor. The man White is tracking turns out to be a special kind of crazy. Uncommonly charismatic, he has the wit and cunning to elude law enforcement while seducing new victims. More women will die before White gets on his trail, but no one will hurt the sheriff as badly as Irene.

    • Whiskey River by Loren D. Estleman

      Whiskey River

      Loren D. Estleman

      Edgar Award Finalist: In the throes of Prohibition-era Detroit, one reporter follows the gripping and violent life of a man who helped keep the booze flowing. Like nowhere else in America, Detroit flourished during Prohibition. The constant flow of liquor from across the Canadian border made Lake Erie a war zone, and lined the pockets of the men who ran the Purple Gang, the Unione Siciliana, and the Little Jewish Navy. As the mob bosses got rich, they mingled with the upper crust like never before. But Prohibition was more than just a boon for gangsters. For newspapermen, it was a dream come true. It’s 1928, and the Detroit Times’ Connie Minor knows every thug, moll, and triggerman south of Eight Mile. He’s drinking rotgut whiskey in a speakeasy on Vernor when he meets Jack Dance for the first time, and watches as the preening young hothead joins Joey Machine’s mob. Over the next few years, the two mobsters will fight a battle for the soul of Detroit’s underground, and Connie Minor will be there to cover every shot. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Loren D. Estleman including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

    • They've Killed Anna by Marc Olden

      They've Killed Anna

      Marc Olden

      Edgar Award Finalist: When his source is murdered, Harker knows he’s on the right track.

      Finally, Harker has a break in the nuclear story. There is a vast conspiracy inside the government to keep the dangers of nuclear energy from the public, and now he has a source on the inside. Anna Alexander, an employee at a nuclear firm, has documents that will blow the industry wide open—if she can make it to her rendezvous with Harker alive. Her employers are poisoning her with plutonium, and when she calls Harker, she is nearly dead from radiation sickness. By the time he makes it to Nevada, she’s gone.

      The car wreck looks like an accident, but the papers she was bringing him are nowhere to be found. They killed Anna to keep her from talking to the press—so just imagine what they’ll do to the reporter.

    • Séance on a Wet Afternoon by Mark McShane

      Séance on a Wet Afternoon

      Mark McShane

      Hoping for notoriety, a struggling psychic kidnaps a child in this Edgar Award–nominated mystery.
      Most so-called psychics disgust Myra Savage. She has no patience for their chintz and cheap tricks, for her power is real. Myra can see into other people’s minds, can even sometimes sense the future, but she has never yet communicated with the other side. For that she needs the cooperation of great psychics, but she lacks the stature to attract their attention. To satisfy this burning need for fame, she and her husband concoct The Plan. Bill snatches a six-year-old girl from her schoolyard and pastes together a letter demanding ransom. After a few days of citywide panic, Myra will lead the police to the girl and the money, and all of London will know her name. When a criminal can see the future, what could possibly go wrong?

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    • The Mother Shadow by Melodie Johnson Howe

      The Mother Shadow

      Melodie Johnson Howe

      Edgar Award Finalist: After a suicide, two oddball female sleuths investigate a coin collection that is anything but small change.
      Maggie Hill’s life has become temporary. Her marriage was temporary, her jobs are temporary, and if work doesn’t pick up, her time in California might be temporary, too. Her latest employer is Ellis Kenilworth, an aging coin expert with a first-rate collection and a tenth-rate family. One morning, he has Maggie type up a codicil to his will, changing the document so that his million-dollar rare-coin collection goes not to his kin, but to a woman named Claire Conrad. By the end of the day, the codicil has vanished, and Kenilworth has killed himself with a shotgun. When the hyena-like family starts to circle Maggie, she reaches out to Conrad. The heiress is an eccentric private detective who wears only black and white—and whose sense of honesty is as clear-cut as her wardrobe. Together, they fight to protect an old man’s final wish, battling against a family so greedy that they would steal the coins right out of the dead man’s hand.
    • Grave Descend by Michael Crichton

      Grave Descend

      Michael Crichton

      An Edgar Award finalist from the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Jurassic Park: A diver enters dangerous waters to recover a sunken yacht.
      The Grave Descend lies under more than sixty feet of clear blue Caribbean water, guarded by a coral reef and schools of hungry hammerhead sharks. Raising it would be a near-impossible task, but James McGregor is suited to the impossible. An expert diver, he makes his living exploring sunken ships. But there’s something strange about the wreck of the Grave Descend.

      How did she sink? Why do none of the survivors tell the same story? And what was the cargo inside her hull? To answer these questions, McGregor will have to contend with the deadliest sharks around—both underwater and on land.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Michael Crichton including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • An Unkindness of Ravens by Ruth Rendell

      An Unkindness of Ravens

      Ruth Rendell

      Edgar Award Finalist: In this “mystery of the highest order,” a cheating husband vanishes and the women of Sussex aren’t giving up their secrets (The New Yorker).

      For London’s Chief Inspector Reg Wexford, it wasn’t an official call. He was just being neighborly when he agreed to talk to Joy Williams about her missing husband, Rodney. Apparently, he went to Ipswich on business and never came home. Wexford has an idea what happened: He most likely ran off with one of his girlfriends.

      However, there are a few nagging concerns, like Rodney’s suspicious letter of resignation and his abandoned car. And is it just a fluke that his disappearance coincides with a rash of stabbings—all straight through the heart, all with male victims. Wexford’s detective instincts must take flight in order to bring down a murderer. Or two. Or three. Because, behind the seemingly placid domesticity of his Sussex neighbors, there is a growing web of tangling secrets, double lives, and triple-crosses.

      “Rendell, winner of the Mystery Writers of America’s prestigious Edgar Award, is regarded as one of the top mystery writers working today. With An Unkindness of Ravens, she shows, once again, that reputation is well-deserved” (Los Angeles Times).
    • Born to Kill by T. J.  English

      Born to Kill

      T. J. English

      Edgar Award Finalist: An inside account of criminal life among Chinatown’s fiercest thugs.
      They are children of the Vietnam War. Born and raised in the wasteland left by American bombs and napalm, these young men know a particular brand of cruelty—which they are about to export to the United States. When the Vietnamese gangs come to Chinatown, they adopt a name remembered from GI’s helmets: “Born to Kill.” And kill they do, in a frenzy of violence that shocks even the old-school Chinese gangsters who once ran Canal Street. Killing brings them turf, money, and power, but also draws the government’s eye. Even as Born to Kill reaches its height, it is marked for destruction. This story is told from the perspective of Tinh Ngo, a young gang member who eventually grows disenchanted with murder and death. When he decides to inform on his brothers to the police, he enters a shadow world far more dangerous than any gangland.
    • Born to Kill by T. J.  English

      Born to Kill

      T. J. English

      Edgar Award Finalist: An inside account of criminal life among Chinatown’s fiercest thugs.
      They are children of the Vietnam War. Born and raised in the wasteland left by American bombs and napalm, these young men know a particular brand of cruelty—which they are about to export to the United States. When the Vietnamese gangs come to Chinatown, they adopt a name remembered from GI’s helmets: “Born to Kill.” And kill they do, in a frenzy of violence that shocks even the old-school Chinese gangsters who once ran Canal Street. Killing brings them turf, money, and power, but also draws the government’s eye. Even as Born to Kill reaches its height, it is marked for destruction. This story is told from the perspective of Tinh Ngo, a young gang member who eventually grows disenchanted with murder and death. When he decides to inform on his brothers to the police, he enters a shadow world far more dangerous than any gangland.
    • The Cavanaugh Quest by Thomas Gifford

      The Cavanaugh Quest

      Thomas Gifford

      Edgar Award nominee: Backwoods treachery links a string of grisly Minnesota murders
      Reporter Paul Cavanaugh is coming home from an afternoon tennis match when he sees an ambulance outside his building’s door. A half hour earlier, the mild-mannered Larry Blankenship walked into the lobby, said hello to the doorman, and blew his brains out in front of the elevator bank, leaving behind a note apologizing for the mess. Cavanaugh retreats to his apartment to forget this disturbing scene, thinking the story is over when the police take away the body. But the suicide is only the beginning. A knot of death is tied tight around Blankenship’s wife, Kim, an ice-cold beauty from the backwoods of northern Minnesota. As he investigates the string of deaths, Cavanaugh discovers a decades-old atrocity that may explain why the men who know Kim vanish faster than a sunny day in Minneapolis.
    • Blood Innocents by Thomas H. Cook

      Blood Innocents

      Thomas H. Cook

      In Thomas H. Cook’s Edgar Award–nominated first novel, a weary detective tracks a blood-crazed psychopath Blood seeps into the gutters at the children’s zoo in Central Park. Two deer have been slaughtered, one stabbed fifty-seven times and the other slashed across the neck. Normally it would be a case for the Parks Department, but these are no ordinary deer. The pride of the small menagerie, they were given to the zoo by a prominent socialite who cannot afford bloody headlines. The NYPD hands the case to Detective Reardon, star of the homicide squad. A recent widower at fifty-six, Reardon has seen too many human victims to care much about the two butchered animals. He resents being taken off other pressing cases for the sake of politics, but soon another killing snaps him to attention. Two women are found dead in their apartment, one stabbed fifty-seven times and the other with her throat cut. Surely this vicious parallel isn’t a coincidence.…
    • Blood Echoes by Thomas H. Cook

      Blood Echoes

      Thomas H. Cook

      Edgar Award Finalist: A true-crime account of a vicious massacre and the legal battles that followed. It was not a clever killing. On May 5, 1973, three men escaped from a Maryland prison and disappeared. Joined by a fifteen-year-old brother, they surfaced in Georgia, where they were spotted joyriding in a stolen car. Within a week, the four young men were arrested on suspicion of committing one of the most horrific murders in American history. Jerry Alday and his family were eating Sunday dinner when death burst through the door of their cozy little trailer. Their six bodies are only the beginning of Thomas H. Cook’s retelling of this gruesome story; the horrors continued in the courtroom. Based on court documents, police records, and interviews with the surviving family members, this is a chilling look at the evil that can lurk just around the corner.
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    • Falling Angel by William Hjortsberg

      Falling Angel

      William Hjortsberg

      Edgar Award Finalist: The hunt for a vanished singer leads a detective into the depths of the occult in this “terrific” novel (Stephen King).
      Big-band frontman Johnny Favorite was singing for the troops when a Luftwaffe fighter squadron strafed the bandstand, killing the crowd and leaving the singer near death. The army returned him to a private hospital in upstate New York, leaving him to live out his days as a vegetable while the world forgot him. But Louis Cyphre never forgets. Cyphre had a contract with the singer, stipulating payment upon Johnny’s death—payment that will be denied as long as Johnny clings to life. When Cyphre hires private investigator Harry Angel to find Johnny at the hospital, Angel learns that the singer has disappeared. It is no ordinary missing-person’s case. Everyone he questions dies soon after, as Angel’s investigation ensnares him in a bizarre tangle of black magic, carnival freaks, and grisly voodoo. When the sinister Louis Cyphre begins appearing in Angel’s dreams, the detective fears for his life, his sanity, and his soul.

      Falling Angel was the basis for the Alan Parker film Angel Heart, starring Mickey Rourke, Robert De Niro, and Lisa Bonet.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of William Hjortsberg including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • The Blind Run by Brian Freemantle

      The Blind Run

      Brian Freemantle

      Edgar Award Finalist: Imprisoned for treason, Charlie Muffin hunts for a way out—by crossing a line. After a trumped-up trial, Charlie Muffin lands in jail for treason—ready to learn the secrets of his fellow inmate, a convicted British traitor. Nobody expected KGB agents to stage a prison break to free their man. Charlie faces another choice: go to Moscow to complete his assignment or face 40 long years in prison. It doesn’t take him long to decide. Charlie doesn’t have the full picture, of course, which is the way of espionage. But Charlie doesn’t regret his Iron Curtain escape, as it leads him to Natalia Fedova, the KGB interrogator assigned to determine if his defection is genuine or staged. For anyone else, the risk would be suicidal. But for Charlie, the greatest danger may be falling in love. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Brian Freemantle including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Suspicion of Innocence by Barbara Parker

      Suspicion of Innocence

      Barbara Parker

      Edgar Award Finalist: This Miami-set crime thriller by a New York Times–bestselling author is “an exhilarating debut [and] a sizzling page-turner” (Publishers Weekly).

      Gail Connor is a fast-rising attorney in a major law firm, about to make partner—until her life is derailed by the discovery of her sister’s murdered body and the quick revelation that Gail herself is the prime suspect. Gail must fight for her life as she gets a firsthand look at the dark underside of the legal system.

      Written by a former prosecutor, Suspicion of Innocence is “a sun-drenched variation on the work of Scott Turow and Patricia Cornwell” (Library Journal).

      Suspicion of Innocence is the 1st book in the Gail Connor and Anthony Quintana series, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.
    • A Gentleman Called by Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      A Gentleman Called

      Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      In Grand Master of crime fiction Dorothy Salisbury Davis’s second Mrs. Norris novel, which the New York Times hailed as “tensely perplexing,” the crime-solving Scottish housekeeper helps crack the case of a serial lady-killer
      As housekeeper to James Jarvis’s recently deceased father, a retired major general of the US Army, Mrs. Norris has raised Jimmie since boyhood. Now the Wall Street lawyer faces a challenging case. The son of one of the firm’s old blue-blood clients has been slapped with a paternity suit. But Teddy Adkins swears he never slept with the woman.

      Meanwhile, Mrs. Norris is miffed when her gentleman friend Jasper Tully, the widowed chief investigator for the Manhattan DA’s office, cancels one dinner date after another because a real estate magnate has been found strangled in the bedroom of her Upper East Side apartment. Jewelry was stolen, but there are no signs of a break-in. Tully’s investigation turns up a trail of strangulations that extends all the way to the Midwest. As Mrs. Norris pursues her own unorthodox investigation, she uncovers a shocking link between the cases that threatens her very life.
      A Gentleman Called, a finalist for the Mystery Writers of America’s Edgar Award, is the second novel in Dorothy Salisbury Davis’s Mrs. Norris Mysteries, which also include Death of an Old Sinner, Old Sinners Never Die, and “Mrs. Norris Observes,” a short story in the collection Tales for a Stormy Night.

      A Gentleman Called is the 2nd book in the Mrs. Norris Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.

    • Where the Dark Streets Go by Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      Where the Dark Streets Go

      Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      Edgar Award Finalist: Hailed by Mary Higgins Clark as “one of the best mystery-suspense writers,” Grand Master of crime fiction Dorothy Salisbury Davis presents a spellbinding tale of passion and deadly deceit that begins with a dying man’s mysterious last words.
      Father McMahon is struggling to write a sermon when a boy runs into his office. A man in his tenement is dying, the boy says, and it is too late for a doctor or the police. In the basement of the apartment house, Father McMahon kneels beside the blood-soaked man, who has been stabbed with a knife. The man asks for no absolution. He wants to talk of life, not death, and takes to his grave the identity of his killer—and his own.
      No one in the neighborhood—not his lover or his friends—knows the man’s real name, where he came from, or why someone would want to kill him. But in his final minutes, he reveals one clue that sends Father McMahon, a cop, and a wealthy young woman down New York’s dark streets, where a killer is waiting to strike again.
    • God Speed the Night by Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      God Speed the Night

      Dorothy Salisbury Davis

      Edgar Award Finalist: Hailed by the New York Times as “a book you will not readily forget,” this World War II adventure tale of a nun who risks her life to help a Jewish couple escape Nazi-occupied France is the collaborative creative effort of Grand Master of crime fiction Dorothy Salisbury Davis and award-winning television writer Jerome Ross,
      It is harvest season in St. Hilaire, and for those who take their living from the land, it should be a joyous time. But in the fall of 1943, there is no joy in France. Paris has fallen, the Vichy government is collaborating with the Germans, and the Gestapo roam the countryside, conscripting French men to toil in faraway German factories. For Sister Gabrielle, a novice in the local convent, the occupation tries her faith as nothing has before. But she is about to get an opportunity to stand up to evil in a way that few of her countrymen have dared.
      Marc and Rachel Daridan arrive in St. Hilaire just a few steps ahead of the secret police and throw themselves on the mercy of Sister Gabrielle and the other nuns at the Convent of Ste. Geneviève. In a time when doing right can mean death, this devout young woman takes on a risky, seemingly impossible challenge.

    • A Brother's Blood by Michael C. White

      A Brother's Blood

      Michael C. White

      Edgar Award Finalist: A German comes to Maine to investigate his brother’s long-forgotten murder.

      Dieter Kallick fought for Rommel in North Africa, doing his duty to the Fatherland right up until he was captured by American GIs. He and his comrades had been told stories of the savagery of the Americans, but when he arrived at the work camp in Maine, he was surprised to find the countryside beautiful and the people kind. In the summer of 1944, he worked in a logging camp in the backwoods of New England, befriending a quiet young girl named Libby Pelletier. She is the only one to mourn Dieter when he dies.

      Fifty years later, Libby’s memories of the logging camp are stirred when Dieter’s brother Wolfgang appears seeking information about Dieter’s death. His questions puncture the placid surface of this small, rural town, and soon lead to another murder. To find the truth behind these two killings, Libby will have to learn to put the past to rest.
    • A Wasteland of Strangers by Bill Pronzini

      A Wasteland of Strangers

      Bill Pronzini

      Edgar Award Finalist: A mysterious stranger sparks mistrust and violence in a gripping tale of small-town prejudice, jealousy, and murder from Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Bill Pronzini.

      The arrival of big, ugly John C. Faith in a battered Porsche sends up warning flags throughout the small Northern California resort community of Pomo. No one trusts the stranger who refuses to talk about why he is there. And when a local beauty with questionable morals is found murdered, suspicion immediately falls on him. Condemned without a trial, Faith hides among Pomo’s outcasts and conducts his own investigation. But his hunt for the killer and the town’s hunt for him threaten to dredge up secrets best left uncovered in this powder keg of a town, exposing crimes and dark compulsions that can only lead to more violence and death.

      A riveting thriller told from various points of view, A Wasteland of Strangers is an extraordinary feat of literary invention from one of noir fiction’s most acclaimed practitioners.
    • The Great Merlini by Clayton Rawson

      The Great Merlini

      Clayton Rawson

      A dozen compact puzzles from a master of the locked-room mystery
      The Great Merlini waits impatiently at the door of the Hotel Astor. Inspector Church is late for his meeting with the famed magician, with whom he consults when homicide cases venture outside the realm of the possible. A ventriloquist has attempted suicide in the wake of his wife’s mysterious strangulation. Among the suspects are a snake charmer, a nine-foot giant, a tattooed man, and a gaggle of crap players—and this is one of Merlini’s simple cases. He will pick out the killer, with no more effort than he might a rabbit in a top hat. In these twelve short stories, all originally published in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, cofounder of Mystery Writers of America and Special Edgar Award winner Clayton Rawson’s greatest detective confronts puzzles that would leave a lesser magician’s head spinning. From vanishing blackmailers to murderous mediums, no cosmic crime can baffle the Great Merlini.
    • The Hot Rock by Donald E.  Westlake

      The Hot Rock

      Donald E. Westlake

      Edgar Award Finalist: Fresh out of prison, John Dortmunder plans a heist that could mean war in this thriller by Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Donald E. Westlake. John Dortmunder leaves jail with ten dollars, a train ticket, and nothing to make money on but his good name. Thankfully, his reputation goes far. No one plans a caper better than Dortmunder. His friend Kelp picks him up in a stolen Cadillac and drives him away from Sing-Sing, telling a story of a $500,000 emerald that they just have to steal. Dortmunder doesn’t hesitate to agree. The emerald is the crown jewel of a former British colony, lately granted independence and split into two nations: one for the Talabwo people, one for the Akinzi. The Akinzi have the stone, the Talabwo want it back, and their UN representative offers a fine payday to the men who can get it. It’s not a simple heist, but after a few years in stir, Dortmunder could use the challenge.

    • Dread Journey by Dorothy B. Hughes

      Dread Journey

      Dorothy B. Hughes

      A starlet on a transcontinental train fears her director may be trying to kill her in this novel by Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Dorothy B. Hughes.
      Four years after she arrived in Los Angeles, Kitten Agnew has become a star. Though beautiful and talented, she’d be nowhere without Vivien Spender: Hollywood’s most acclaimed director—and its most dangerous. But Kitten knew what she was getting into when she got involved with him; she had heard the stories of Viv’s past discoveries: Once he discarded them, they ended up in a chorus line, a sanatorium, or worse. She knows enough of his secrets that he wouldn’t dare destroy her career. But he may be willing to kill her. On a train from Los Angeles to Chicago, Kitten learns that Viv is planning to offer her roommate a part that was meant for her. If she lets him betray her, her career will be over. But fight for the part, and she will be fighting for her life as well.

    • The Day the Music Died by Ed Gorman

      The Day the Music Died

      Ed Gorman

      In 1950s Iowa, a murder-suicide forces a lawyer to put aside his rock-and-roll grief
      Sam McCain loves Buddy Holly because he’s the only rock-and-roll star who still seems like a dweeb, and Sam knows how that feels. With the unrequited love of his life at his side, Sam drives more than three hours through the snow to watch his idol play the Surf Ballroom. That night, Buddy Holly dies in the most famous plane crash in music history, but Sam has no time to grieve. Because there are too many lawyers in this small town, Sam makes a living as a PI, doing odd jobs for an eccentric judge—whose nephew, it seems, has a problem only a detective could solve. His trophy wife has been murdered, and as soon as Sam arrives, the nephew kills himself, too.
      The police see this as a clear-cut murder-suicide, but Sam wants to know more, diving into a mystery by Ellery Queen Award–winning author Ed Gorman that will get dangerous faster than you can say “bye-bye, Miss American Pie.”
    • The Sherlock Holmes Stories of Edward D. Hoch by Edward D. Hoch

      The Sherlock Holmes Stories of Edward D. Hoch

      Edward D. Hoch

      A dozen marvelous tales of deduction, featuring history’s most famous detective, by Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Edward D. Hoch.
      In a heavily mortgaged country house, an heiress’s sinister guardian attempts to trap her in a bedroom with a rare Indian swamp adder—a murder averted only by the timely intervention of Sherlock Holmes. Five months after the events of “The Adventure of the Speckled Band,” Holmes and Watson are called back to Stoke Moran by a frightened gypsy who claims that the viper has gotten loose again. Holmes is unsure which poses a greater danger: the rumored snake, or the possibility that the gypsy is telling lies.
      In these dozen tales, short story master Edward D. Hoch resurrects the most brilliant mind in the history of detective fiction. In the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes tangles with circus tigers, Druidic curses, and a pair of Christmas killings. Here is the finest detective of the Victorian age—recreated by one of the greatest mystery writers of the twentieth century.

    • The Greek Coffin Mystery by Ellery Queen

      The Greek Coffin Mystery

      Ellery Queen

      In one of his earliest cases, Ellery Queen confronts a murder in blue blood America’s master of deduction, Ellery Queen, has made his name by combining dazzling feats of pure reason with the old-fashioned legwork that comes with being the son of a New York cop. Before he became the nation’s most famous sleuth, he was just an untested talent—a bookworm who thought he might put his genius to work solving crimes. Young Queen made his bones on the Khalkis case. The scion of a famous New York art-dealing family, Georg Khalkis has spent several years housebound with blindness—a misery he is relieved of when a heart attack knocks him dead on the library floor. After the funeral, his will vanishes, and an exhaustive search of home, churchyard, crypt, and mourners reveals nothing. Baffled, the police turn to a headstrong young genius named Ellery Queen. During this case, Queen develops his deductive method—and swings dramatically between failure and success.

      Mystery Writers of America Grand Master and Special Edgar Award–winning author Ellery Queen delivers yet another fast-paced and captivating story in The Greek Coffin Mystery.
    • Never Bet Your Life by George Harmon Coxe

      Never Bet Your Life

      George Harmon Coxe

      From Mystery Writers of America Grand Master George Harmon Coxe: His job was to protect a friend from suicide, but he didn’t count on murder.

      After a car crash takes his daughter’s life, John Gannon doesn’t want to live anymore. He tries twice to kill himself—first by jumping, next with pills—but doesn’t succeed. His doctors recommend a beach vacation with close supervision. For a week Dave Barnum watches his despondent friend drink, fish, and gamble, and gradually grows sick of his ill temper. Finally, convinced that John Gannon has gotten past his suicidal tendencies, Barnum lets his guard down. The mistake proves fatal. That night, at Club 80, someone drugs Barnum’s brandy. By the time he makes it home, Gannon is dead. As he inspects his friend’s body, the killer wallops him on the skull and escapes unseen. Barnum’s job was to protect John Gannon. He failed, and now it’s time for some payback.

    • Death-Watch by John Dickson Carr

      Death-Watch

      John Dickson Carr

      In this Golden Age British-style mystery, Mystery Writers of America Grand Master John Dickson Carr presents Dr. Gideon Fell’s most chilling case, in which a clock-obsessed killer terrorizes London

      A clockmaker is puzzled by the theft of the hands of a monumental new timepiece he is preparing for a member of the nobility. That night, one of the stolen hands is found buried between a policeman’s shoulder blades, stopping his clock for all time.

      The crime is just peculiar enough to catch the attention of Dr. Gideon Fell, the portly detective whose formidable intellect is the terror of every criminal in London. Working closely with Scotland Yard, he finds that the case turns on the question of why the clock hands were stolen. And learning the answer will put Dr. Fell squarely in the path of a madman with nothing but time on his hands.

      Death-Watch is the 5th book in Special Edgar Award–winning author John Dickson Carr’s Dr. Gideon Fell Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.
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    • It's in the Book by Mickey Spillane

      It's in the Book

      Mickey Spillane

      Mike Hammer tears apart New York in search of a dead don’s ledger.

      For years, cops have whispered legends that Don Nicholas Giraldi, the gentleman godfather, kept a ledger going back decades, keeping track of every police officer, mogul, and politician who took even a cent of his dirty money. Finding the register would put mayors, senators, and even a president or two on the hook for prosecution—or blackmail. When old Nic finally kicks the bucket, one such official comes to Mike Hammer and begs him to find the book before it falls into the wrong hands.

      Mike has never believed the stories of the old don’s journal, but for $10,000, he is happy to play along. Every hood in town wants to get his hands on the book, and finding it will mean pushing to the very heart of Nic’s family. No matter how many years may have passed, Mike Hammer can still push harder.

      The Bibliomysteries are a series of short tales about deadly books, by top mystery authors.
    • Wolf in Man's Clothing by Mignon G. Eberhart

      Wolf in Man's Clothing

      Mignon G. Eberhart

      Two nurses investigate a millionaire’ s suspicious gunshot wound in this “absorbing” mystery by a Special Edgar Award–winning author (The New York Times). It takes a compound fracture to bring Craig Brent and Drue Cable together. A millionaire injured in an auto accident, Craig falls quickly for his nurse, wedding Drue as soon as his arm is mended. Craig’s father, disgusted to see his son marrying below his station, pressures him into a divorce, and the whirlwind marriage dies in Reno. A year later, the young lovers are given a second chance, when a bullet shatters Craig’s shoulder. The family insists Craig shot himself while cleaning his gun, but Drue has never known a man to clean his gun at eleven o’clock at night. She calls on Sarah Keate, whose nursing skill is matched only by her deductive reasoning, to unravel the mystery. When Sarah arrives at the Brent house, Craig is in a drugged sleep. If he is ever to awake, the nurses must unmask the killer in his family.
    • The Great Detectives by Otto Penzler

      The Great Detectives

      Otto Penzler

      The origins of literature’s finest crime fighters, told by their creators themselves

      Their names ring out like gunshots in the dark of a back alley, crime fighters of a lost era whose heroic deeds will never be forgotten. They are men like Lew Archer, Pierre Chambrun, Flash Casey, and the Shadow. They are women like Mrs. North and the immortal Nancy Drew. These are detectives, and they are some of the only true heroes the twentieth century ever knew. In this classic volume, Otto Penzler presents essays written by the authors who created these famous characters. We learn how Ed McBain killed—and resurrected—the hero of the 87th Precinct, how international agent Quiller wrote his will, and how Dick Tracy first announced that “crime does not pay.” Some of these heroes may be more famous than others, but there is not one whom you wouldn’t like on your side in a courtroom, a shootout, or an old-fashioned barroom brawl.

    • Her Forbidden Knight by Rex Stout

      Her Forbidden Knight

      Rex Stout

      An innocent young telegraph operator becomes a counterfeiter’s target
      Once, the Lamartine Hotel was a quiet refuge for New York’s stuffy fashionable set. But by the 1890s, fashion has moved uptown, and the lobby of the Lamartine has been overtaken by natty young sports, who pass their afternoons with billiards or shows of noisy derring-do. Their preferred damsel is Lila Williams, a delicate young telegraph operator whose shyness so charms them that they resolve to defend her against any ill-behaved characters. They are about to face their fiercest challenger, who rides in the gleaming armor of a millionaire. His name is John Knowlton, and from the first telegram she writes for him, Lila is charmed. He has money, good looks, and a criminal secret, and his insidious charisma will demand heroic effort from the knights of the Lamartine billiard table in this novel by Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Rex Stout.

    • The Dark Tunnel by Ross Macdonald

      The Dark Tunnel

      Ross Macdonald

      On the home front, two wartime lovers reunite under a cloud of paranoia in this thriller from Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Ross Macdonald
      In 1937 Munich, an American must be careful when he smokes his pipe. Robert Branch, a careless academic, makes the mistake of lighting up when the Führer is about to begin a procession, and nearly gets pummeled for his mistake. Only the timely intervention of Ruth Esch, a flame-haired actress, saves him. So begins a month-long romance between East and West—a torrid affair that ends when the lovers make the mistake of defending a Jew, earning Branch a beating and Esch a trip to a concentration camp. Six years later, Esch escapes to Vichy and makes her way to Detroit. To her surprise, Branch is waiting for her. He is a professor, working for the war effort, and his paranoia about a spy inside the Motor City war board sours their reunion. Once again, a dangerous net is encircling these lovers—a reminder that, in this war, love always comes second to death.
    • The Tree of Hands by Ruth Rendell

      The Tree of Hands

      Ruth Rendell

      Edgar Award Finalist: In London, a missing child unites three mothers in grief, madness, and murder.

      When Benet Archdale was a young girl in North London, her mother, Mopsa, made her nervous. The woman was unsound, and posed ever-present dangers. Yet Benet understood her sickness and forgave her threats. In pursuit of a relatively sane life as a novelist and loving single parent, Benet has since kept Mopsa at a distance. But it’s not only the sudden death of Benet’s two-year-old son that shakes her safe world. It’s the past. Mopsa has returned to be at her inconsolable daughter’s side. Nurturing, rational, and seemingly cured, Mopsa is going to do everything she can to ease Benet’s grief.

      Then, on the other side of town, the child of a barmaid has gone missing. Authorities fear the search can’t end well. As Benet and Mopsa are drawn into the disappearance, the secrets, lies, and desperation of three mothers will converge—by chance and by design. For them, it’s a crime that is at once a delusion, an escape, and a nightmare.

      “No one surpasses Ruth Rendell when it comes to stories of obsession, instability, and malignant coincidence,” says Stephen King of this New York Times–bestselling author, and all three come into play in this novel, a winner of the Crime Writers’ Association Silver Dagger Award. A classic of psychological suspense, The Tree of Hands was adapted twice for the screen: first in 1989, as Innocent Victim starring Lauren Bacall and Helen Shaver; then again in 2001, for the French film Alias Betty.
    • Tarnished Icons by Stuart M. Kaminsky

      Tarnished Icons

      Stuart M. Kaminsky

      Edgar Award Finalist: Rostnikov uncovers a crime spree with roots in a long-lost Tsarist treasure.
      Porfiry Rostnikov was just a boy when he lobbed a grenade at the Nazi tank, destroying the evil machine and his left leg with it. And after five decades’ dragging his lame leg behind him, the police inspector decides to have the useless limb amputated. The Cold War is over, and as Russia learns to walk again, its finest policeman must do the same. Meanwhile, a knife-wielding rapist known as the Silent One terrorizes the women of Moscow, and a bloodthirsty gunman begins a campaign to exterminate the city’s Jews. And while investigating this hate-fueled crime wave, Rostnikov uncovers a mystery concerning a murdered baroness and a priceless wolf statue that has been missing since 1862. Moscow is on the verge of a bright new future, but the horrors of this ancient city’s past may mean a return to the dark ages.
    • Death Leaves a Bookmark by William Link

      Death Leaves a Bookmark

      William Link

      Attempting the perfect murder, a killer encounters the perfect cop in this short story by Special Edgar Award and Ellery Queen Award–winning author William Link.
      After years of get-rich-quick schemes, Troy Pellingham’s bank account is empty and his options are down to one: take a job in his uncle’s rare book shop, and spend his days working for an unpleasant man whose only redeeming quality is a mammoth bank account. Though well into his eighties, Uncle Rodney is the picture of good health, and the day when Troy will inherit the old man’s money seems very far away. But then Troy gets a brilliant idea—why shelve books for a living, when he can kill for a fortune? After the deed is done, a peculiarly shabby police detective comes to call. Lieutenant Columbo seems dimwitted, and Troy expects he will have no trouble putting him off the scent. But as the noose tightens around his neck, Troy realizes that no murder is too perfect for Columbo.

      The Bibliomysteries are a series of short tales about deadly books, by top mystery authors.
    • Body Language by Julius Fast

      Body Language

      Julius Fast

      Body Language helps you to understand the unconscious body movements and postures that provide intimate keys to what a person is really thinking and the secrets of their true inner selves. You will learn how to read the angle of shoulders, the tilt of a head, or the tap of a foot, in order to discern whether an individual is angry, frightened, or cheerful. You will be able to use Body Language to discover the most—and least—important person in any group by the way others position themselves. The body is not able to lie, for it sends subtle signals to those who know how to read them. Body Language will even show you how to do it without others knowing you are observing them. Body Language was a huge best seller when first published and has remained in print ever since. It has been thoroughly updated and revised especially for this ebook edition.

    • The Baby in the Icebox by James M. Cain

      The Baby in the Icebox

      James M. Cain

      A collection of stories, both early and late, that show how Mystery Writers of America Grand Master James M. Cain made his name
      There is a hungry tiger loose in the house, and that is not good news for anyone. A jealous husband let the animal out of his cage hoping he would eat his wife alive, but tigers aren’t used to taking orders. This jungle cat will get his meal, and he doesn’t care where it comes from.
      “The Baby in the Icebox” begins with a murdered wildcat and ends with a dead human—and what comes in between is some of the most striking prose James M. Cain ever put to paper. It is one of the first stories this master of crime fiction ever wrote, and it shows all the hallmarks of the novels that would later make him famous—namely Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice. The tales in this collection are short, but Cain never needed more than a few pages to thrill.
    • The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie

      The Mysterious Affair at Styles

      Agatha Christie

      The debut of Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Agatha Christie and her remarkable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot

      Invalided home from the Western Front, Arthur Hastings arrives at Styles Court anticipating a relaxing sojourn in the English countryside. It turns out to be anything but. Late one night, Hastings is summoned to the locked bedroom door of Emily Inglethorp, mistress of the manor. A terrible commotion is happening inside, and by the time her family forces the door open it is too late—Emily is in the final, violent throes of strychnine poisoning and nothing can save her.

      As fate would have it, Belgium’s most celebrated detective, a refugee from the war, resides in the neighboring village. Hercule Poirot may look, in the words of Hastings, like a “quaint dandyfied little man,” but he possesses one of the finest minds in Europe and an extraordinary flair for solving the most baffling of cases. Half a dozen people—including Alfred, Emily’s much younger second husband; her slacker stepsons, John and Lawrence; and Mary, her beautiful but bored daughter-in-law—had the means and the motive to poison Emily. While Hastings and the rest of Styles Court rush to judgment, Poirot painstakingly sifts through the clues and considers each of the suspects in turn. The answer at which he arrives will shock them all.

      Agatha Christie wrote The Mysterious Affair at Styles because her sister wagered that she could not plot a mystery. Not only did Christie win that bet, she created one of the greatest detectives in all of literature and established herself as the undisputed Queen of Crime.

      This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
    • The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes by Vincent Starrett

      The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes

      Vincent Starrett

      An indispensable biography of the world’s most famous detective from Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Vincent Starrett

      In a boarding house at 221B Baker Street, a genius is at work. With the help of his tireless companion, Dr. Watson, the peerless Sherlock Holmes solves one impossible mystery after the next. Many of his adventures, such as “The Hound of the Baskervilles” and “The Red-Headed League,” are world famous, while others, including “The Adventure of the Tired Captain” and “The Singular Affair of the Aluminum Crutch,” remain strictly private, simply because Watson cannot find the time to write them down.

      This glimpse into the secret case files of England’s greatest detective is just one of the fascinating tidbits included in Vincent Starrett’s landmark book of Sherlockiana. A founding member of the Baker Street Irregulars, Starrett enriches his meticulous research with a true fan’s delight. Whether he is discussing Arthur Conan Doyle’s real-life criminal investigations or detailing the layout of 221B Baker Street and its surrounding neighborhood, Starrett’s deep appreciation for the stories and their inimitable hero is infectious. Countless companion volumes to the series have been published, but none offers as much insight and entertainment as The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes does.

      This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
    • The House of Dies Drear by Virginia  Hamilton

      The House of Dies Drear

      Virginia Hamilton

      In Virginia Hamilton’s Edgar Award–winning novel, teenager Thomas Small and his family must uncover the haunting historical legacy of their Civil War–era house

      Shortly after moving into an old, spooky home, thirteen-year-old Thomas Small and his family start hearing strange noises. The house has a past, and when Thomas discovers a hidden passageway that may have been part of the Underground Railroad, the family realizes the house has a history as well. To find out all there is to know about the House of Dies Drear, Thomas must explore secret rooms—and the secrets of lives lived centuries before, lives that tell the story of America’s troubled early years.
    • The Case of the Lost Boy by Dori Hillestad Butler

      The Case of the Lost Boy

      Dori Hillestad Butler

      The Edgar Award–winning first book in Dori Hillestad Butler's Buddy Files series

      King’s family is missing, and he’s been put in the P-O-U-N-D. Why doesn’t his beloved human, Kayla, come to get him? When King is adopted by Connor and his mom, things get more confusing. The new family calls him Buddy! Then Connor disappears! Buddy (aka King) has some big problems to solve. Mystery fans and dog lovers will be swept up in Dori Butler’s entertaining story about a smart, funny, loyal dog . . . and left eager for Buddy’s next adventure.

    • Through the Hidden Door by Rosemary Wells

      Through the Hidden Door

      Rosemary Wells

      Avoiding a group of bullies, Barney Pennimen and his friend Snowy discover a cave with an amazing secret
      Barney Penniman is afraid of his eighth grade friends at boarding school. Since they’re the nastiest guys at school, Barney is safe from being teased, but the gang’s bullying finally pushes Barney too far, and he finds himself alone.
      Then Snowy Cobb, an elf-like, ostracized younger boy, makes a sudden appearance in Barney’s life. And when Snowy finds a mysterious bone on campus, the boys try to determine its origins. Their investigation leads them to a deep, dark, sandy-bottomed cave, and what they discover beneath the sand will test their beliefs—and everything they hold dear. This adventure story was the runner-up for an Edgar Award. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Rosemary Wells including rare images from the author’s collection.

    • Ransom by Lois  Duncan

      Ransom

      Lois Duncan

      Edgar Award Finalist: When the strange new bus driver passes the last stop, the five teens on board know they’ll be lucky to make it home alive.
      Valley Gardens is the last stop on the bus route after school. The neighborhood is known for its wealthy families, perhaps the richest in town. Marianne, Bruce, Glenn, Dexter, and Jesse live in Valley Gardens, and have no trouble guiding the new bus driver to the last stop of the day—but the strange substitute driver keeps driving. Soon the five teenagers are hostages deep in the mountains. Their kidnappers demand stacks of money from their families, even though most of the students aren’t as well off as the abductors assume. Without hope of raising the ransom money, the five teens must find a way out or face terrifying consequences. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Lois Duncan including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

    • Help Wanted by Richie Tankersley Cusick
      Edgar Award Finalist: A job in a manor-house library gives Robin more than she bargained for.
      All Robin wants is a part-time job. A friend has invited her on a Florida vacation that promises to be the trip of a lifetime, and Robin needs money for airfare. The ad on the school bulletin board is irresistible: “Get Rich Quick,” it promises, and Robin can’t say no. Her new employer is the patriarch of the Swanson family, a wealthy bunch of weirdos who recently moved into Manorwood, a stately mansion that has been empty for as long as Robin can remember. Now its libraries are full of books that Robin must organize—books that belonged to a woman named Lilith who died in a gruesome suicide. Robin doesn’t think she can trust the Swansons, including Parker Swanson, heir to the family fortune and most popular boy in school. And when Robin finds a clump of bloody hair in the backyard, she begins to fear that the Swansons’ evil past is not past at all. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Richie Tankersley Cusick including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
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