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  • Remembering America by Richard N. Goodwin

    Remembering America

    Richard N. Goodwin

    A behind-the-scenes history of the most momentous decade in American politics, now with a new introduction by the author

    Richard N. Goodwin entered public service in 1958 as a law clerk for Supreme Court Associate Justice Felix Frankfurter. He left politics ten years later in the aftermath of Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s assassination. Over the course of one extraordinary decade, Goodwin orchestrated some of the noblest achievements in the history of the US government and bore witness to two of its greatest tragedies. His eloquent and inspirational memoir is one of the most captivating chronicles of those turbulent years ever published.

    From the Twenty-One quiz-show scandal to the heady days of John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign to President Lyndon Johnson’s heroic vote wrangling on behalf of civil rights legislation, Remembering America brings to life the most fascinating figures and events of the era. As a member of the Kennedy administration, Goodwin charted a new course for US relations with Latin America and met in secret with Che Guevara in Uruguay. He wrote Johnson’s historic civil rights speech, “We Shall Overcome,” in support of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and formulated the concept of the Great Society and its programs, which sought to eradicate poverty and racial injustice. After breaking with Johnson over the president’s commitment to the Vietnam War, Goodwin played a pivotal role in bringing antiwar candidate Eugene McCarthy to within a few hundred votes of victory in the 1968 New Hampshire primary. Three months later, he was with his good friend Robert F. Kennedy in Los Angeles the night that the young senator’s life—and the progressive movement that had rapidly brought about such significant change—came to a devastating end.

    Throughout this critical decade, Goodwin held steadfast to the passions and principles that had first led him to public service. Remembering America is a thrilling account of the breathtaking victories and heartbreaking disappointments of the 1960s, and a rousing call to action for readers committed to justice today.
  • Not in Your Lifetime by Anthony Summers

    Not in Your Lifetime

    Anthony Summers

    Updated with the latest evidence, Pulitzer Prize finalist Anthony Summers’s essential, acclaimed account of President Kennedy’s assassination
    “He was holding out his hand . . . He looked puzzled . . . Then he slumped in my lap . . . I kept bending over him saying, ‘Jack, Jack, can you hear me? I love you, Jack . . .’ The seat was full of blood and red roses . . . .” —Jacqueline Kennedy, recalling the fatal moment in Dallas Fifty years on, most Americans still feel they have not been told the truth about President Kennedy’s death. Chief Justice Warren, who chaired the first inquiry, said “some things” that “involve security” might not be released in our lifetime. Millions of pages of assassination records were finally made public in the late 1990s. Yet the CIA is withholding more than a thousand documents under “national security”—until 2017. Why? Why hold these records back if—as we were told half a century ago—Lee Harvey Oswald was a lone assassin? Anthony Summers set out to write a reliable account of the murder mystery that haunts America.Not in Your Lifetime, in this fresh edition, is one of the finest books written on the assassination.
  • Case Closed by Gerald Posner

    Case Closed

    Gerald Posner

    Pulitzer Prize Finalist: “By far the most lucid and compelling account . . . of what probably did happen in Dallas—and what almost certainly did not.” —The New York Times Book Review
    The Kennedy assassination has reverberated for five decades, with tales of secret plots, multiple killers, and government cabals often overshadowing the event itself. As Gerald Posner writes, “Fifty years after the assassination, the biggest casualty has been the truth.” In this first-ever digital edition of his classic work, updated with a special comment for the fiftieth anniversary, Posner lays to rest all of the convoluted conspiracy theories—concerning the mafia, a second shooter, and the CIA—that have obscured over the decades what really happened in Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963.
    Drawing from official sources and dozens of interviews, and filled with powerful historical detail, Case Closed is a vivid and straightforward account that stands as one of the most authoritative books on the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
  • Kennedy Justice by Victor Navasky

    Kennedy Justice

    Victor Navasky

    Finalist for the National Book Award: A groundbreaking portrait of the intersection of law and politics in Robert F. Kennedy’s Department of Justice
    As United States Attorney General, the young, legally inexperienced Robert F. Kennedy sat at the head of a vast department tasked with enforcing the law and defending the rights of an entire nation. Although his family connection to the White House raised eyebrows, Robert Kennedy’s tenure was marked by impassioned battles to root out corruption and protect individual civil liberties. From his fierce stand against organized crime to his tumultuous relationship with FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, RFK proved time and again that he was a champion of fairness.
    In this investigative account of the Kennedy years, acclaimed scholar Victor S. Navasky crafts an unmatched portrait of the complex interaction of power and principle in the halls of justice.
  • A Common Good by Helen O'Donnell

    A Common Good

    Helen O'Donnell

    An illuminating account of the history-making friendship between RFK and the chief of staff to JFK—a bond built on shared ideals, but severed by tragedy.

    When they first met at Harvard in 1946, young Bobby Kennedy and Kenny O’Donnell could not have imagined where their lives would take them. Teammates on both the football and debate teams, they formed a partnership that would sustain them through the years, from Robert Kennedy’s tenure as attorney general to O’Donnell’s years as John F. Kennedy’s chief of staff. Together they lived, worked, and struggled through some of the most pivotal moments of the twentieth century, including the assassination of JFK in Dallas. Their harmonious relationship was cut short only by Bobby’s own tragic death.

    With full access to the Kennedy family archives, Helen O’Donnell brings an inspiring personal and political alliance to life. With A Common Good, she amply fulfills the promise she made to her late father to honor and preserve his memories of Robert F. Kennedy for future generations.

    Kirkus Reviews hails A Common Good as “a moving and intimate study of a unique friendship but also of the time and place, now long ago, in which this friendship formed and blossomed.” O’Donnell “set out to write ‘a good book about two good men.’ In this she has succeeded.”
  • Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye by Kenneth P. O'Donnell

    Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye

    Kenneth P. O'Donnell

    This classic New York Times bestseller is an illuminating portrait of JFK—from his thrilling rise to his tragic fall—by two of the men who knew him best.

    As a politician, John Fitzgerald Kennedy crafted a persona that fascinated and inspired millions—and left an outsize legacy in the wake of his murder on November 22, 1963. But only a select few were privy to the complicated man behind the Camelot image.

    Two such confidants were Kenneth P. O’Donnell, Kennedy’s top political aide, and David F. Powers, a special assistant in the White House. They were among the president’s closest friends, part of an exclusive inner circle that came to be known as the “Irish Mafia.” In Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye, O’Donnell and Powers share memories of Kennedy, his extraordinary political career, and his iconic family—memories that could come only from intimate access to the man himself.

    As they recount the full scope of Kennedy’s journey—from his charismatic first campaign for Congress to his rapid rise to national standing, culminating on that haunting day in Dallas—O’Donnell and Powers lay bare the inner workings of a leader who is cherished and mourned to this day, in a memoir that spent over five months on the New York Times bestseller list.
  • Oswald's Game by Jean Davison

    Oswald's Game

    Jean Davison

    While much was written in the wake of Lee Harvey Oswald’s assassination of President John F. Kennedy, few journalists stopped to ask who Oswald really was, and what was driving him. In Oswald’s Game, Davison slices to the core of the man, revealing Oswald’s most formative moments, beginning with his days as a difficult but intelligent child. She traces his erratic service in the Marine Corps, his youthful marriage, and the radical interests that prompted him to defect to the Soviet Union. A rounded and enthralling portrait emerges, illuminating Oswald’s intense conflicts and contradictions. Writing against the grain of earlier accounts, Davison sifts through the evidence to compose an utterly persuasive narrative of Oswald’s personal and political motivations, based not on conspiracy but on the life of a profoundly troubled man.
  • Upstairs at the White House by J. B. West

    Upstairs at the White House

    J. B. West

    A New York Times bestseller: A fascinating behind-the-scenes look at life on Pennsylvania Avenue with America’s first families, by the man who spent nearly three decades in their midst
    J. B. West, chief usher of the White House, directed the operations and maintenance of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue—and coordinated its daily life—at the request of the president and his family. He directed state functions; planned parties, weddings and funerals, gardens and playgrounds, and extensive renovations; and, with a large staff, supervised every activity in the presidential home. For twenty-eight years, first as assistant to the chief usher, then as chief usher, he witnessed national crises and triumphs, and interacted daily with six consecutive presidents and first ladies, as well as their parents, children and grandchildren, and houseguests—including friends, relatives, and heads of state.

    J. B. West, whom Jackie Kennedy called “one of the most extraordinary men I have ever met,” provides an absorbing, one-of-a-kind history of life among the first ladies. Alive with anecdotes ranging from Eleanor Roosevelt’s fascinating political strategies to Jackie Kennedy’s tragic loss and the personal struggles of Pat Nixon, Upstairs at the White House is a rich account of a slice of American history that usually remains behind closed doors.
  • With Malice by Dale K. Myers

    With Malice

    Dale K. Myers

    The definitive work on the murder of Dallas patrolman J. D. Tippit—killed forty-five minutes after President Kennedy—and its far-reaching implications for the JFK assassination and aftermath
    Although considered the Rosetta stone of the case against Lee Harvey Oswald, the murder of Dallas police officer J. D. Tippit—killed less than an hour after the assassination of President Kennedy—has proven to be one of the most misunderstood, largely ignored, and often twisted aspects of the Kennedy assassination. For five decades, a community of doubters has contorted official accounts of the shooting to exonerate Oswald. There have been many questions raised about Tippit’s death over the past fifty years, but few real attempts to find the answers. Did Oswald murder Tippit? Was Tippit a part of the plot to murder President Kennedy? What really happened on Tenth Street? In With Malice, Dale K. Myers brings thirty-five years of research to this second-by-second account of the murder of Officer Tippit and the frantic manhunt that ended in the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald. Filling a major void in Kennedy assassination literature, it weaves firsthand accounts, newly released documents, and previously unpublished photographs into a detailed tapestry of facts that lifts the veil on the mystery surrounding this pivotal moment in American history.

  • Conversations with Kennedy by Benjamin C. Bradlee

    Conversations with Kennedy

    Benjamin C. Bradlee

    Distinguished journalist Benjamin C. Bradlee’s intimate biography of President John F. Kennedy and his Camelot years.

    Conversations with Kennedy is legendary reporter and executive Benjamin C. Bradlee’s account of his intimate dialogues with JFK—a man he counted as a confidante and friend. Beginning in 1958, when Kennedy was a US senator running for president, and continuing until 1963, the year that Kennedy died, Bradlee shared a close professional and personal relationship with the charismatic politician. Both men were war veterans, idealists, and up-and-coming American leaders, and they shared values that drove their friendship.

    Kennedy was a politician equally at home with the bruising intellects he appointed to government posts and his working-class constituents. He respected his complicated father, understood his brothers, admired women, and had few illusions about human nature. Bradlee’s eye for detail reveals JFK’s views on everything from Communism to conservatism to freedom of the press.

    From parties at the White House to weekends at Palm Beach to JFK’s enduring influence on Bradlee’s own life, this is an in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at the man behind a myth, written by a giant of American journalism.
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