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  • Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.

    Requiem for a Dream

    Hubert Selby Jr.

    A tale of four people trapped by their addictions, the basis for the acclaimed Darren Aronofsky film, by the author of Last Exit to Brooklyn.
    Sara Goldfarb is devastated by the death of her husband. She spends her days watching game shows and obsessing over appearing on television as a contestant—and her prescription diet pills only accelerate her mania. Her son, Harry, is living in the streets with his friend Tyrone and girlfriend Marion, where they spend their days selling drugs and dreaming of escape. When their heroin supply dries up, all three descend into an abyss of dependence and despair, their lives, like Sara’s, doomed by the destructive power of drugs. Tragic and captivating, Requiem for a Dream is one of Selby’s most powerful works, and an indelible portrait of the ravages of addiction. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Hubert Selby Jr. including rare photos from the author’s estate.
  • The Cocaine Chronicles by Gary Phillips

    The Cocaine Chronicles

    Gary Phillips

    The Cocaine Chronicles joins The Speed Chronicles in launching Akashic’s new anthology series styled after the Noir Series.
    Nothing to snort at, this ambitious anthology of jaw-grinding criminal behavior is masterfully curated by acclaimed authors Phillips and Tervalon. Cocaine, that most troubling and fascinating of substances is the subject, the subtext, the whys and whereofs in The Cocaine Chronicles, a collection of original short stories that are funny and harrowing, sad and scary, but at all times riveting. The Cocaine Chronicles contains tough tales by a cross-section of today’s most thought-provoking writers. Featuring brand-new stories by: Susan Straight, Lee Child, Laura Lippman, Ken Bruen, Jerry Stahl, Nina Revoyr, Bill Moody, Emory Holmes II, James Brown, Gary Phillips, Jervey Tervalon, Kerry E. West, Donnell Alexander, Deborah Vankin, Robert Ward, Manuel Ramos, and Detrice Jones.
  • The Heroin Chronicles by Jerry Stahl

    The Heroin Chronicles

    Jerry Stahl

    Inspired by the ongoing international success of the city-based Akashic Noir Series (Brooklyn Noir, Boston Noir, Paris Noir, etc.), last year Akashic created the new Drug Chronicles series. On the heels of The Speed Chronicles (Sherman Alexie, William T. Vollmann, Megan Abbott, James Franco, Beth Lisick, etc.) and The Cocaine Chronicles (Lee Child, Laura Lippman, etc.) comes The Heroin Chronicles, a volume sure to frighten and delight. The literary styles are varied, as are the moral quandaries herein.

    Heroin has long been understood as the most "literary" of narcotics, and this collection will, for better and worse, have tremendous pop cultural appeal.

    Featuring brand-new stories by Eric Bogosian, Lydia Lunch, Jerry Stahl, Nathan Larson, Ava Stander, Antonia Crane, Gary Phillips, Jervey Tervalon, John Albert, Michael Albo, Sophia Langdon, Tony O'Neill, and L.Z. Hansen.

  • The Story of Junk by Linda Yablonsky

    The Story of Junk

    Linda Yablonsky

    Witty, terrifying, and utterly cool, Yablonsky’s roman à clef is a searing, hyperreal account of the heroin underground in 1980s Manhattan

    Told with dark humor and unremitting honesty, Linda Yablonsky’s riveting first novel explores the New York art and postpunk music world of the early 1980s from deep within. Set in motion by the appearance of a federal agent, the tale follows two women on a dangerous and seductive journey through a bohemia where hard drugs, extreme behavior, intense friendships, and the emergence of AIDS profoundly alter their lives.
  • Red Floyd by Michele Mari

    Red Floyd

    Michele Mari

    An award-winning work of epic alternative history tracing the rise of one of the twentieth century’s most beloved bands: Pink Floyd

    Hailed in Italy as an ingenious, genre-bending fictional account of the rise of Pink Floyd, Michele Mari’s Red Floyd follows the illustrious rock band from infancy to world renown through the eyes of an incredible array of witnesses—real and imaginary, dead and alive.

    Blending the true with the apocryphal, Red Floyd takes readers into the wild and rowdy world of English progressive rock and into the minds of such legendary figures as David Bowie, Stanley Kubrick, and Alan Parsons. Mari’s narration opens a mesmerizing window onto Pink Floyd’s most intense periods of creativity, its tawdry secrets, and its hidden inspirations, creating a rich tapestry that tells one of the most inventive stories in recent fiction.
  • Red-Dirt Marijuana by Terry Southern

    Red-Dirt Marijuana

    Terry Southern

    An underground classic, Red-Dirt Marijuana is a brilliant collection of incisive, darkly comic, devastating stories and wide-ranging pieces by America’s master satirist
    One of the great collections, the range found here is impressive: from new journalism to absurd parodies and theatrical sketches; from absurd short riffs to Southern’s most classic and lyrical early works of fiction. “Red-Dirt Marijuana,” the insightful, funny, and moving story of the relationship between a white boy and a black man, is paired with the horrific knock-down, drag-out of “Razor Fight.” One of the most scandalous stories ever published, “The Blood of a Wig,” combines an insider’s look at the “Quality Lit” biz, the drug underground of Greenwich Village, and a vision of necrophilia involving one of America’s most sacred cows. There is an imaginary encounter between Freud and Kafka in “Apartment to Exchange,” a skewering of the liberal white man and his efforts to befriend a black jazz musician in “You’re Too Hip, Baby,” an exploration of race relations, moonshine, and the baton-twirling subculture in the personal essay “Twirling at Ole Miss” (identified by Tom Wolfe as the first instance of “New Journalism), and many more pieces with Southern’s signature dark satire, unconventional storylines, and pitch-perfect dialogue. Red-Dirt Marijuana and Other Tastes is a wild, funny, and dazzlingly diverse trip through the American culture of the 1950s and 1960s. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Terry Southern including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.

  • Candy by Terry Southern
    The sensational bestseller—a parody of Voltaire’s satire Candide—about the sexy naïf who only wants to truly give of herself

    Candy, that perfect, adorable, innocent girl, was born on Valentine’s Day, and her Daddy says that’s why she’s so beautiful. At her College in Racine, Wisconsin, in Professor Mephisto’s lecture on philosophy and how “deep and aching are the needs of man,” Candy seems to take his pronouncement to heart, dedicating the rest of her days to, as Southern and Hoffenberg put it, “bringing the sweet balm of her warmth to all those lonely men on her arduous path to spiritual enlightenment.” There is the hunchback who causes her to cry out in wild abandon, “Your hump! Give me your hump!”, the crazed gynecologist in the bar bathroom who “examines” her, the salacious aunt, her father’s lecherous twin brother, and the nutty Cracker Foundation, where her guru initiates her into the mystical realm of “glandular mastery.” It is in Tibet, during an earthquake, that a holy man and the Buddha together lead her to full . . . enlightenment.

    Originally published under a pseudonym, this book had the unique honor of being banned in France, only to become one of the bestselling novels of 1960s America—one that brought Southern and Hoffenberg both fame and infamy. A book that, along with Lolita, broke the grip of American literary censorship, Candy leaves you tantalized, scandalized, and weak with laughter.

    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Terry Southern including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate and an extended biography of Mason Hoffenberg.
  • The Speed Chronicles by Joseph Mattson

    The Speed Chronicles

    Joseph Mattson

    Following the international success of the Noir Series, this volumes marks the launch of a new drug-based sister series.

    Speed: the most demonized—and misunderstood—drug in the land. Deprived of the ingrained romantic mysticism of the opiate or the cosmopolitan chic of cocaine or the mundane tolerance of marijuana, there is no sympathy for this devil. Yet speed—crystal meth, amphetamines, Dexedrine, Benzedrine, Adderall; crank, spizz, chickenscratch, oblivious marching powder, the go-fast—is the most American of drugs: twice the productivity at half the cost, and equal opportunity for all. It feels so good and hurts so bad. From its dueling roots of pharmaceutical miracle cure and Californian biker-gang scourge to contemporary Ivy League campuses and high school chem labs, punk rock clubs to the military-industrial complex, suburban households to tin-can ghettos, it crosses all ethnicities, genders, and geographies—from immigrants and heartlanders punching double factory shifts to clandestine border warlords, doctors to bomber pilots, prostitutes to housewives, T-girls to teenagers, Academy Award-nominated actors and the mansion on the hill to the poorest Indian on the rez—making it not only the most essentially American narcotic, but the most deceivingly sundry literary matter. The subject of speed is so innately intimidating yet so undeniably present that it begs to be written about. It is no secret that the drug has historically tuned up the lives of writers, including Jack Kerouac, Susan Sontag, Philip K. Dick, and scores more. Too rarely, though, has it been written about, and its jolt to the bones of the American landscape continues to peak. Akashic Books dares to bring forth the first contemporary collection of all new literary short fiction on the drug from an array of today’s most compelling and respected authors. These are no stereotypical tales of tweakers—the element of crime and the bleary-eyed, shaky zombies at dawn are here right alongside heart-wrenching narratives of everyday people, good intentions gone terribly awry, the skewed American Dream going up in flames, and even some accounts of pure joy. Featuring brand-new stories by: Sherman Alexie, William T. Vollmann, James Franco, Megan Abbott, Jerry Stahl, Beth Lisick, Jess Walter, Scott Phillips, James Greer, Tao Lin, Joseph Mattson, Natalie Diaz, Kenji Jasper, and Rose Bunch.

  • The Marijuana Chronicles by Jonathan Santlofer

    The Marijuana Chronicles

    Jonathan Santlofer

    Featuring brand new stories, poems, prose, and graphics by: Joyce Carol Oates, Lee Child, Linda Yablonsky, Thad Ziolkowski, Raymond Mungo, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, Edward Madrid Gomez, Philip Spitzer, Dean Haspiel, Maggie Estep, Amanda Stern, Bob Holman, Abraham Rodriguez, Jan Heller Levi, and others.

    Pot. Grass. Hash. Hemp. Reefer. Ganja. Dope. Weed. Smoke. Spliff. Mary Jane. Tea. Blunt. The popular drug. The disputed drug. The everyman and -woman drug. Medical marijuana. Recreational pot. For the young, the old, and everyone in between. The drug that doesn’t have you pawning the family silver along with your mother for the next toke. It’s the easy drug. No shooting up and losing your job. Finally, a book that will address the drug (or, as Arnold Schwarzenegger said, “That is not a drug. It is a leaf.”) in all its diversity and drama, its folklore and fact, in prose, poems, pictures, and more. Like Dave Chappelle says: “Hey, hey, hey. Smoke weed every day.”

  • Odditorium by Hob Broun

    Odditorium

    Hob Broun

    A pro softball player, an alcoholic husband, a drug deal out of town, and buried treasure—the postmodern and vibrantly pulpy debut novel from Hob Broun
    The heroine of Odditorium is Tildy Soileau, a professional softball player stuck in a down-and-out marriage in South Florida. Leaving her husband to his own boozy inertia, she jumps at the chance to travel to New York with Jimmy Christo, only recently released from a mental institution, and make some much-needed cash on a drug deal.
    Adventure is just as much a motivating force, though, and Tildy quickly gets involved with a charismatic drug dealer; meanwhile, in carrying out business, Jimmy is dangerously sidetracked in Tangier. By the time the two are back in Florida, a financial boon greets them, but here, too, trouble is in the wings. Formally daring and full of jolts of the unexpected, Odditorium is an addictive romp through shady realms.

  • Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed

    Mumbo Jumbo

    Ishmael Reed

    Ishmael Reed’s inspired fable of the ragtime era, in which a social movement threatens to suppress the spread of black culture—hailed by Harold Bloom as one of the five hundred greatest books of the Western canon
    In 1920s America, a plague is spreading fast. From New Orleans to Chicago to New York, the “Jes Grew” epidemic makes people desperate to dance, overturning social norms in the process. Anyone is vulnerable and when they catch it, they’ll bump and grind into a frenzy. Working to combat the Jes Grew infection are the puritanical Atonists, a group bent on cultivating a “Talking Android,” an African American who will infiltrate the unruly black communities and help crush the outbreak. But PaPa LaBas, a houngan voodoo priest, is determined to keep his ancient culture—including a key spiritual text—alive. Spanning a dizzying host of genres, from cinema to academia to mythology, Mumbo Jumbo is a lively ride through a key decade of American history. In addition to ragtime, blues, and jazz, Reed’s allegory draws on the Harlem Renaissance, the Back to Africa movement, and America’s occupation of Haiti. His style throughout is as avant-garde and vibrant as the music at its center. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Ishmael Reed including rare images of the author.

  • Riverfinger Women by Elana Dykewomon

    Riverfinger Women

    Elana Dykewomon

    Award-winning author Elana Dykewomon’s powerful debut novel about lesbian life in America during the social upheaval of the late 1960s and early 1970s
    Written when she was just twenty-four years old, Riverfinger Women is Elana Dykewomon’s beloved, intimate coming-of-age novel about Inez and her circle of friends—the Riverfinger women—struggling to find themselves amid the changing social mores of the Civil Rights era. Inez has known she was a lesbian since childhood, and while moving between Highland, her boarding school, and her friends’ Greenwich Village apartment, she experiences longing and disappointment, friendship and romance, and her first real relationship, with schoolmate Abby. Along with their experimental and outgoing friend Peggy, Inez and Abby graduate from Highland and move into adulthood, confronting the prejudices of the larger world as they go.
    Told in an engrossing interweaving narrative, Riverfinger Women explores the characters’ brushes with sexual violence, prostitution, drugs, love, and, ultimately, happiness amid the thrills and challenges of lesbian life during the second women’s liberation movement.
  • Say Jesus and Come to Me by Ann Allen Shockley

    Say Jesus and Come to Me

    Ann Allen Shockley

    The physical and emotional attraction a charismatic black female evangelist feels for a beautiful but damaged blues singer grows into a powerful, sensual love in a southern city rocked by racism, intolerance, and sexual violence
    The traveling minister Reverend Myrtle Black is a proud, strong African American woman, passionately devoted to God, justice, and intimate female contact. Enraged over a brutal assault on two young prostitutes, the good pastor comes to Nashville intending to organize local women in protest over the racism and sexism the city’s officials seem all too eager to ignore. Then, in the course of her crusade, a beautiful, profoundly damaged stranger walks through the church door . . . and turns Myrtle’s life upside down.
    A world-famous rhythm-and-blues singer, Travis Lee has experienced more than her share of pain and heartbreak. Having hit rock bottom—burned out on drugs and stuck in her latest very bad relationship—she comes to Reverend Myrtle seeking the kind of hope and salvation only Jesus can bring. What she experiences instead is a profound and powerful physical and emotional attraction that neither she nor the minister can ignore. But in the media spotlight, in this town where intolerance rules, a love such as theirs is a most dangerous thing, inspiring the hatred and violence of those who would go to any lengths to destroy it.

  • Goodbye Without Leaving by Laurie Colwin

    Goodbye Without Leaving

    Laurie Colwin

    The enchanting and insightful story of a woman trying to reconcile her rock-and-roll past with her respectable present

    When Geraldine Colshares drops out of graduate school to become the only white backup singer in an R&B band, nobody thinks it is a good idea. Not her parents, who are sure she is on drugs. Not her best friend, who sees going on tour as a way of staving off real life. Not even Doo-Wah Banks, her Juilliard-trained bandmate and crush, who suggests she find a nice white husband. But to be a Shakette—as in Vernon and Ruby Shakely and the Shakettes—has been the burning desire of Geraldine’s heart since puberty, and when she steps on stage in her chartreuse dress and luminescent shoes, she knows she is exactly where she belongs.

    All good things must come to an end, however, and after two years on the road Geraldine quits the band and settles down to the kind of conventional routine—marriage, children, dinner parties—she never expected. To her family and friends, Geraldine seems to have it all, but the question remains: Once you’ve been a Shakette, will anything else ever feel so right?

    A hilarious and touching novel about staying true to yourself while moving on with life, Goodbye Without Leaving stars one of Laurie Colwin’s most distinctive and delightful heroines.

    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Laurie Colwin including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.

  • On the Stroll by Alix Kates Shulman

    On the Stroll

    Alix Kates Shulman

    A teenage runaway from Maine gets an eye-opening introduction to life on the streets of New York City
    Robin catches a bus from her home in Maine to New York City to escape her tyrannical father. With no money and little hope of finding a decent job, the sixteen-year-old girl is easy prey for a hard-luck pimp named Prince. He quickly gains Robin’s trust and introduces her to the seedy underbelly of the city, a world of sex, drugs, and lies in which she must fight to survive. A homeless woman named Owl, who was once beautiful and bold, befriends Robin as they both struggle to take control of their lives. On the Stroll is a moving, gritty picture of the people who find themselves on society’s margins and a heartrending look at the ultimate costs of homelessness and prostitution.

  • The Music Room by Dennis McFarland

    The Music Room

    Dennis McFarland

    Dennis McFarland’s acclaimed debut novel, hailed by the New York Times Book Review as “a rare pleasure . . . Remarkable from its beginning to its surprising, satisfying end”
    Musician Marty Lambert’s life is already falling apart when he receives the phone call that changes everything. His brother, Perry, has killed himself in New York, and Marty—with his marriage on the rocks and his record company sliding into insolvency—decides to leave San Francisco to investigate exactly what went wrong. His trip sends him headlong into the life his only brother left behind—his pleasures and disappointments, his friends, his lovely girlfriend, Jane—and finally, to the home they shared growing up in Virginia. Along the way, through memories and dreams, Marty relives their complicated upbringing as the children of talented, volatile musicians and alcoholics. Through the tragedy, Marty finally faces the demons of his past, ones he pretended he had buried long ago, to emerge on the other side of grief, toward solace and a more hopeful future.
  • The Washington Square Ensemble by Madison Smartt Bell

    The Washington Square Ensemble

    Madison Smartt Bell

    Madison Smartt Bell’s debut novel: a story of drifters, outcasts, junkies, and dealers surviving in the heart of 1980s New York City

    Over one busy weekend, small-time heroin dealer Johnny B. Goode and his alliance of fellow pushers work their trade amidst students, businessmen, and assorted sewer rats while avoiding the law. Narrated from the separate perspectives of each member of the gang, The Washington Square Ensemble follows the twisted paths that have led the seven men through the gritty New York underworld and towards a fragile alliance at Washington Square. With humor, compassion, and an uncanny ear for voices of the streets, Madison Smartt Bell delivers a stunning indictment—and occasional celebration—of a blighted New York landscape.

  • Blood Sports by Eden Robinson

    Blood Sports

    Eden Robinson

    A young man with a questionable past must survive a nightmare of terror and torture in this dark and powerful thriller from one of Canada’s most acclaimed contemporary authors

    The Downtown Eastside in Vancouver, Canada, is about as close to urban hell as you can get in the Western Hemisphere. Yet in this cauldron of drugs, shattered dreams, and extreme violence, Tom Bauer and his girlfriend, Paulie—both ex-junkies and parents of baby Melody—are trying to make a life for themselves. For years, Tom, an epileptic, was firmly under the thumb of his psychopathic criminal cousin Jeremy, who dragged Tom down into a netherworld of addiction, prostitution, pornography, sadism, and murder. But those days are over, or so Tom believes—until the day that he returns home from work to find two vicious thugs waiting for him and Paulie, and little Mel gone. What happens next will change Tom’s life forever and outdo every horror that still dwells in the shadows of his memory.

    In this sequel to her critically acclaimed novella “Contact Sports,” author Eden Robinson returns to the gritty urban landscape of inner-city Vancouver and offers a disturbing view of human lives on a razor’s edge. A story that jumps freely backward and forward in time, presented in a brilliant and unconventional tapestry of literary styles, Robinson’s second novel is truly a mind-blowing experience that will thrill, move, enthrall, and horrify readers in equal measure.
  • Zone of the Interior by Clancy Sigal

    Zone of the Interior

    Clancy Sigal

    A riotously funny saga of institutional insanity, based on the author’s association with the notorious psychiatrist R. D. Laing
    Despite massive literary success, Sidney Bell feels perpetually unsatisfied and suffers unexplained physical ailments. Desperate to straighten out his twisted life, anxiety-ridden Sid seeks help from experimental psychiatrist Dr. Willie Last, whose therapeutic methods involve hallucinatory drugs such as LSD and trading places with his patients. After a tumultuous first trip, Sid ends up at Conolly House, a radical hospital for young schizophrenics where he serves as a “barefoot doctor.” From there, Sigal launches readers on a sardonic, rambling journey through a fantastic breed of insanity.
    With his freewheeling, ecstatic prose, Sigal spins a manic psychological quest into a telling portrait of a society in the grips of a turbulent decade. Zone of the Interior is a subversive and uproarious search for clarity and comfort in an increasingly mad world, grounded by an unforgettable narrator.

  • Toots in Solitude by John Yount

    Toots in Solitude

    John Yount

    Funny, suspenseful, tender, and wise—the story of a man who took to the woods, and the woman who found him there

    Soon after his fortieth birthday, Macon “Toots” Henslee left his home, his job, and his marriage to live in a tree house. Lots of people—his wife especially—thought that he had lost his mind, but from his perch atop a Tennessee riverbank, Toots could see plainly the insanity of his old life. He had become a man who said and did the opposite of what he wanted to say and do—what could be crazier than that?

    Nine years later, Toots is out fishing one morning when he catches sight of a nervous young woman hiding behind a sycamore. Sally Ann Shaw is an aspiring country singer in trouble—the kind of trouble that comes with a briefcase full of stolen drug money and a pair of hired thugs in hot pursuit. A hermit’s tree house is the perfect hiding place, but in such close quarters, Toots and Sally Ann have more than gangsters to fear. For a man who gave up everything to start life over again and a woman in desperate need of a hero, love may be the most dangerous game of all.

    Hailed by the New York Times as “a tale written with zest and read with pleasure,” Toots in Solitude is a novel as eccentric, endearing, and irresistible as its unforgettable main character.
  • Stargazer by Stephen  Koch

    Stargazer

    Stephen Koch

    The classic study of a man who redrew the boundaries of art
    Andy Warhol’s work and personality changed American visual culture forever, making him an international superstar. His rise to global fame, his entanglement with the seedy New York sexual underground, and the shocking assassination attempt that almost ended his life are chronicled in Stephen Koch’s indispensible classic Stargazer.
    In this must-read volume, Stephen Koch provides unprecedented detail on Warhol’s life and work, giving particular attention to a medium that found Andy at his wildest: film. In one who made paradox into an art form, Koch finds that there was inspiration and brilliance on both sides of the public image that Warhol so meticulously crafted.
  • The Last Party by Anthony Haden-Guest

    The Last Party

    Anthony Haden-Guest

    A riveting memoir of disco-era nightlife and the outrageous goings-on behind the doors of New York City’s most famous and exclusive nightclub

    In the disco days and nights of New York City in the 1970s and 1980s, the place to be was Studio 54. Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, and Bianca Jagger were among the nightly assortment of A-list celebrity regulars consorting with New York’s young, wild, and beautiful. Studio 54 was a place where almost nothing was taboo, from nonstop dancing and drinking beneath the coke-dusted neon moon to drugs and sex in the infamous unisex restrooms to the outrageous money-skimming activities taking place in the office of the studio’s flamboyant co-owner Steve Rubell.

    Author Anthony Haden-Guest was there on opening night in 1977 and over the next decade spent many late nights and early mornings basking in the strobe-lit wonder. But The Last Party is much more than a fascinating account of the scandals, celebrities, crimes, and extreme excesses encouraged within the notorious Manhattan nightspot. Haden-Guest brings an entire era of big-city glitz and unapologetic hedonism to breathtaking life, recalling a vibrant New York night world at once exhilarating and dangerous before the terrible, sobering dawn of the age of AIDS.
  • Rubber Soul by Greg Kihn

    Rubber Soul

    Greg Kihn

    Greg Kihn continues to pioneer the rock-thriller genre with Rubber Soul, a murder mystery and an action-packed ride through Beatlemania, featuring the Beatles themselves.

    Dust Bin Bob runs a secondhand shop at the Flea Market at Penny Lane. He has an extensive rep of American R&B singles that he gets from merchant marines returning from Baltimore and New York. The action starts when he befriends some blokes by the names of John, Paul, George, and Ringo and becomes their lifelong friend sharing the vinyl that will start a revolution.

    From then on, it’s a rocket ride from their earliest days in Liverpool to six shows a night in Hamburg to the Cavern Club to full-fledged Beatlemania.

    Along the way, Dust Bin Bob uncovers a plot by Marcos loyalists to assassinate the Fab Four in Manila after they snub Imelda Marcos, blowing off a reception at the palace and narrowly avoiding an international incident. It all could have happened!

    100 percent historically accurate and including previously unpublished information about the Beatles’ early days, Rubber Soul is inspired by Greg Kihn’s radio interviews with Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Pete Best, Patti Harrison, and Yoko Ono. When he asked where the Beatles got those rare American R&B records that inspired their early music, he got his answer from merchant marines who brought them over from Baltimore to Liverpool.

    From a serious Beatles fan who has read every word ever written about the group, Rubber Soul is a wild ride through rock ’n’ roll history.

  • The Day the Music Died by Ed Gorman

    The Day the Music Died

    Ed Gorman

    In 1950s Iowa, a murder-suicide forces a lawyer to put aside his rock-and-roll grief
    Sam McCain loves Buddy Holly because he’s the only rock-and-roll star who still seems like a dweeb, and Sam knows how that feels. With the unrequited love of his life at his side, Sam drives more than three hours through the snow to watch his idol play the Surf Ballroom. That night, Buddy Holly dies in the most famous plane crash in music history, but Sam has no time to grieve. Because there are too many lawyers in this small town, Sam makes a living as a PI, doing odd jobs for an eccentric judge—whose nephew, it seems, has a problem only a detective could solve. His trophy wife has been murdered, and as soon as Sam arrives, the nephew kills himself, too.
    The police see this as a clear-cut murder-suicide, but Sam wants to know more, diving into a mystery by Ellery Queen Award–winning author Ed Gorman that will get dangerous faster than you can say “bye-bye, Miss American Pie.”
  • The Motion of Light in Water by Samuel R. Delany

    The Motion of Light in Water

    Samuel R. Delany

    In the bohemian sixties, a young writer tries to make sense of his life
    With the poet Marilyn Hacker, Delany moves into a tenement on a dead-end street that the landlord reserves for interracial couples. Between playing folk music in the evenings at the same Greenwich Village coffee shop as Bob Dylan and preparing shrimp curry for W. H. Auden and Chester Khalman, who have accepted an invitation that night for dinner, Delany takes a stab at writing science fiction. This young prodigy would complete and sell five novels before he turned twenty-two! (And then have a nervous breakdown . . .) This beautifully written memoir is a testament to a neighborhood where experimentation was a way of life.
    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
  • Black Light by Elizabeth Hand

    Black Light

    Elizabeth Hand

    A decadent tale of ancient darkness that “does for upstate New York what Stephen King has done for rural Maine,” from the author of Waking the Moon (Publishers Weekly).
    Lit Moylan lives what she thinks is an ordinary life. Sure, her town has a few eccentric theater types, but that’s all. That is until her Warholian godfather, Axel Kern, moves into the big house on the hill. He throws infamously depraved parties, full of drinks, drugs, and sex. But they also have a much more sinister purpose. At one of these parties, Lit touches a statue, and learns she has much more of a role to play in this world than she ever thought possible. Ornate and decadent, Black Light visits an irresistible world of ancient gods and secret societies as enthralling as it is dangerous. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Elizabeth Hand including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
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  • Rhode Island Red by Charlotte Carter

    Rhode Island Red

    Charlotte Carter

    This New York noir tale of a saxophone-playing amateur detective takes some jazzy twists

    Saxophonist Nanette Hayes, a majestic five-foot-ten-inch Grace Jones lookalike with hot style, lives for the music of her jazz forebears. Self-taught Nan is no Charlie Parker, but she dreams big. She performs regularly—on the sidewalks of New York City. Not exactly the Village Vanguard, but it pays the bills in ways that her master’s degree in French does not. Mostly, Nanette just tries to stay cool in the face of the worst kinds of hardship. Recently, this has taken the form of getting dumped—hard—by her live-in boyfriend, Walter.

    When her normally messy life is at its epic messiest, fellow street musician Sig walks up, and—after insulting her playing and narrowly missing being hit by a bus—changes everything. Out of nowhere, sixty grand that can’t possibly be legit appears in Nan’s sax. Suddenly she is contending with two grisly murders, a former lover who wants her back, a jazz-obsessed ex-con, and some scarifying cops who are trying to shake her down.

    Equal parts tough and romantic, Nanette uses her street-musician smarts and her New York City savvy to try to save her own skin and solve a musical mystery no less a legend than Bird himself.

    Rhode Island Red is the first book in the Nanette Hayes Mystery series.
  • The Suspense Is Killing Me by Thomas Gifford

    The Suspense Is Killing Me

    Thomas Gifford

    A journalist searches for the true story of his glamorous sibling’s death
    When rock star J. C. Tripper died, only his brother Lee was by his side, and in the decades since, Lee has been deviled by questions of what really happened that night in Tangier. He thinks he knows the truth, but his recollection of that final drug-soaked bender is about to be called into question. An old acquaintance mails Lee a Nazi pistol and four Polaroid pictures of a dead body—an invitation to reopen a long-cold murder investigation. Lee then reconnects with Sam Innis, onetime best friend to the brothers Tripper, who urges him to track down J.C.’s former bandmates and music industry contacts. That night, Lee’s girlfriend, a bestselling conspiracy theorist, is tortured to death in her tub. As his brother comes back to haunt him, Lee must unravel the mystery of J.C.’s last days, or risk joining him behind the velvet rope at the great after-party in the sky.
  • Extreme Justice by William Bernhardt

    Extreme Justice

    William Bernhardt

    Retired from law, Ben Kincaid is forced to return to the bar when a case—and a corpse—fall in his lap
    After years of struggling, Ben Kincaid shuts down his small legal office and decides to make a living doing something that—compared to practicing law in Tulsa—is easy money: playing jazz piano. He buys a minivan to haul his gear, and gets steady gigs playing in a combo at Uncle Earl’s Jazz Emporium. His new career is just starting to take off when a body falls from the Emporium ceiling, knocking the wind out of Kincaid and sending him right back to his old profession. The dead woman is Cajun Lily Campbell, a grand dame of the Tulsa music scene and onetime girlfriend of Uncle Earl himself. And Kincaid must be careful as he readies the old jazzman’s defense, because there is a killer on the north side of town who would like nothing more than to hear the piano player’s last tune.

  • Listen to Bob Marley by Cedella Marley

    Listen to Bob Marley

    Cedella Marley

    An inspiring collection of poems, meditations, and lyrics by one of the world’s most revered musical legends

    Bob Marley’s music defined a movement and forever changed a nation. Known worldwide for their message of peace and unity, Marley’s songs—from “One Love” to “Redemption Song” to “Three Little Birds”—have touched millions of lives. This collection is the best of Bob Marley presented in three parts: “The Man,” giving an in-depth look into the life of Bob Marley; “The Music,” comprising his most memorable lyrics as well as links to many of his songs in iTunes; and “The Revolution,” containing his meditations on social equality and the Rastafari movement. Enriched with iconic photographs, Listen to Bob Marley provides insight into a reggae legend, the inspirational man behind the music. This ebook features an introduction by daughter Cedella Marley and an illustrated biography of Cedella including rare photographs from her personal collection.

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  • The Waterfront Journals by David Wojnarowicz

    The Waterfront Journals

    David Wojnarowicz

    Voices from the margins of American life tell their sad and shocking stories of trickery, betrayal, sex, and defeat in a poignant and powerful collection of more than forty short monologues

    In his full but regrettably brief lifetime, David Wojnarowicz was many things: a visual and performance artist whose radical work incensed the right-wing establishment, a tireless AIDS and anticensorship activist, and, most emphatically, a writer. His Waterfront Journals are a remarkable collection of fictionalized stories spoken in the voices of unforgettable characters the author met during his time spent living on America’s streets and traveling her back roads. The narrators speak from the heart and from the depths of despair, creating an often shocking and powerfully moving mosaic of American life in the shadows.

    Here are junkies and boy hustlers, truckers and hoboes. A runner tells of his encounter with two drug-using priests who openly and proudly discuss their various sexual exploits. Whores tell of johns who brutalized them and corrupt cops who did the same. A young man relays his tale of a seedy movie balcony pickup and his shocking discovery that his “date” was not who she seemed. Another man describes sex with an amputee Vietnam veteran. Each of their stories stuns with hard and haunting truths that will leave the reader staggered and breathless, and yet exhilarated.

  • Superstar by Viva

    Superstar

    Viva

    A bold and uncensored fictional account of the wild life at Andy Warhol’s world-famous Factory by a real-life superstar who witnessed it all

    Author, video artist, underground film actor, and superstar, the incomparable Viva is arguably the most famous of Andy Warhol’s protégés, a mainstay at the enigmatic artist’s Factory. In her riveting, revelatory, totally uncensored, and scandalously entertaining novel, the Factory doors are blown wide open, exposing a world of sex, drugs, and genius.

    Based on Viva’s own life, Superstar is the story of Gloria, a repressed, convent-educated aspiring artist who escapes the strictures of her stifling existence and flees to New York City. Falling in with an iconic artist referred to as A. and his coterie of outrageous, beautiful avant-garde acolytes, transvestites, boy toys, and hangers-on, Gloria is reborn, undergoing a remarkable transformation from sheltered young innocent to sexual athlete, film star, and media darling. Over the course of her reawakening, she sheds her every inhibition as she experiences what ordinary people only dream about in their most secret fantasies . . . or worst nightmares.

    Though the names have all been changed, the real stars of Warhol’s factory are scandalously recognizable. Viva injects her own unique style and personality into a story at once outrageous and brutally honest: the unforgettable making of a superstar.
  • Snodgrass and Other Illusions by Ian R. MacLeod

    Snodgrass and Other Illusions

    Ian R. MacLeod

    As seen on Sky Arts’ Playhouse Presents: Imagine there’s no Lennon . . . In the reality-altering novella “Snodgrass,” John Lennon sidesteps his musical destiny and instead becomes a civil servant
    After spending his adolescence like so many others had, playing in a band with friends, John Lennon knows it’s time to grow up. Skipping out on the Beatles before they would go on to become one of the greatest rock groups of the twentieth century, John moves to Birmingham. As he watches the exploits of friends Paul, Ringo, and George, John grows older and lives an ordinary life . . . and he is left wondering “what if?” With “Snodgrass” as its anchor, this collection of eleven stories also includes “The Chop Girl,” inspired by the infamous Dresden bombing raids; “Past Magic,” a futuristic account of parents cloning their children who have passed away; “New Light on the Drake Equation,” inspired by a man’s journey as he searches for signs of extraterrestrial intelligence; and seven more tales that showcase MacLeod’s breadth as a writer.

  • A Sport and a Pastime by James Salter

    A Sport and a Pastime

    James Salter

    The astonishing novel and “tour de force” about a love affair in postwar France from the iconic author of All That Is (The New York Times Book Review).

    Twenty-year-old Yale dropout Phillip Dean is traveling Europe aimlessly in a borrowed car with little money. When he stops for a few days in a church-quiet town near Dijon, he meets Anne-Marie Costallat, a young shop assistant. The two begin an affair both carnal and innocent, and she quickly becomes to him the real France, its beating heart and an object of pure longing.

    James Salter, author of Light Years and the memoir Burning the Days, was an essential voice in the evolution of late twentieth-century prose, a stylist on par with Updike and Roth who won the PEN/Faulkner Award for his collection Dusk and Other Stories. One of the first great American novels to speak frankly of human desire free of guilt and shame, A Sport and a Pastime inspired Reynolds Price to call it “as nearly perfect as any American fiction I know.”

    This ebook edition features an illustrated biography of James Salter including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
  • Pretty Leslie by R. V.  Cassill

    Pretty Leslie

    R. V. Cassill

    From one of midcentury America’s most ambitious and entertaining novelists, the dazzling and disturbing portrait of a housewife’s erotic adventures

    Beautiful, intelligent, and charming, Leslie Daniels is the wife of a successful Illinois physician. To her friends and family, she appears to be happily living the American dream. But there is another side to Leslie, one propelled by lust and unsettling impulses that run completely counter to her comfortable midwestern routine.

    So far, Leslie has managed to keep her unwholesome appetites in check, but when her husband travels out of town to attend a medical conference, she takes the opportunity to commit her first act of adultery. What ensues is a stunning plunge into the depths of desire and despair as Leslie realizes that, once freed from the boundaries of convention, her urges can never again be contained or satisfied.

    Hailed by the New York Times as a “novel of unusual power” about “a spiritual sister to Dostoevsky’s ‘underground man,’ ” Pretty Leslie is a testament to the astonishing powers of R. V. Cassill’s imagination. It is also, from first page to last, a thrilling, unrelenting, and absolutely unforgettable sexual drama.
     

  • Other Men's Daughters by Richard Stern

    Other Men's Daughters

    Richard Stern

    “A beautifully written novel that should be read by everyone who cares about the human condition.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

    Harvard physiologist Robert Merriwether has four whip-smart children, an attractive and intelligent wife, and a successful, stimulating career. True, he and Sarah have not slept together in years, and when he decides to stay behind in Cambridge for the summer while the rest of the family vacations in Maine, his newfound freedom is deeply unsettling. But that does not mean that Merriwether wants to change his life or feels unloved. To a man of science, desire is nothing more than a biological reaction. And Merriwether’s personal philosophy is that once you’re in your forties, real love is nothing but lust and nostalgia.

    Then Cynthia Ryder walks into his life. Twenty years old, she is beautiful, intelligent, witty, and kind. And, to Merriwether’s great surprise, she wants to be with him. Initially, he evades her advances, sure that hers is just a passing fancy. But as he gets to know her better, Merriwether realizes that Cynthia is more mature than he first suspected and that the joy he feels when they are together has been missing from his life for a long, long time. When the summer ends and their need for each other does not fade, Merriwether realizes that he is being given a chance at true love. The question is, will he be brave enough to take it?

    Considered by many critics to be Richard Stern’s finest novel, Other Men’s Daughters is a tender, honest, witty, and life-affirming portrait of a love as transcendent as it is unlikely.
  • The Stoned Apocalypse by Marco Vassi

    The Stoned Apocalypse

    Marco Vassi

    There is no better introduction to the world of Marco Vassi than his autobiography, The Stoned Apocalypse, a stirring and sensual work that is both unflinchingly honest and erotically charged. Did the sixties happen so Vassi could exist, or did Vassi define the decade? His journey across the country at the moment when the Woodstock generation was discarding conventions—and clothes—is an allegory of sexual liberation. If you loved Jack Kerouac’s On the Road you will thrill to The Stoned Apocalypse—and you will be ready to take on Vassi’s mind-blowing novels.

  • Eighty Days Yellow by Vina Jackson

    Eighty Days Yellow

    Vina Jackson

    The international bestseller that takes readers on a daring new adventure in erotic romance

    Caught in a frustrating relationship with a man who can’t accept her for who she is, passionate, flame-haired violinist Summer Zahova finds release in her music. She spends her afternoons playing for money in the London Underground, lost in the works of Vivaldi or Mendelssohn. When her violin is damaged beyond repair, Summer receives a surprising proposition from Dominik, a university professor with powerful desires, who has been captivated by Summer ever since he heard her perform. Dominik will replace her priceless violin, but only if she agrees to play for him in a private concert. Unable to deny the chemistry between them, Dominik and Summer embark on an intense affair full of daring twists and turns, as unpredictable as it is thrilling. For Summer it is a chance to finally embrace her long-denied dark side, but she’ll soon learn that where there’s pleasure there must be pain. Can a relationship born of such all-consuming passion ever really survive? Exhilarating, seductive, and tantalizingly bold, Eighty Days Yellow will leave you breathless for more.

    Now available: the next two books in the Eighty Days TrilogyEighty Days Blue and Eighty Days Red
  • I Watch You by Irene Cao

    I Watch You

    Irene Cao

    What do you do when your greatest temptation is a dangerously handsome and alluring man?

    Elena works as an art restorer in Venice, and is in the process of bringing an old fresco to light in a historic palazzo. Art is her world, along with her best friend, Gaia, and Filippo, an old pal who she thinks just might be her new love . . . until Leonardo comes along. A chef with a tempestuous spirit, Leonardo is in Venice to launch a new restaurant, and he pushes all of Elena’s buttons—good and bad. As Leonardo awakens Elena’s senses, she faces the difficult yet exciting choice between the safety Filippo promises and the danger of Leonardo’s embrace.

    I Watch You is part one of a bestselling erotic trilogy that proves Italians definitely do it better.
  • Sodo in Soho by Alexia Saint-Ange

    Sodo in Soho

    Alexia Saint-Ange

    By day, she’s a pretty, demure brunette specializing in British literature. By night, she’s a sex-crazed party girl!

  • The Wildest Ride by Vonnick de Rosmadec

    The Wildest Ride

    Vonnick de Rosmadec

    Nineteen-year-old Florence loses her innocence at the Castle of Pleasures, where the marquise, her maid, and a riding instructor help the red-haired novice discover her passionate nature.

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  • Licking Our Wounds by Elise D'Haene

    Licking Our Wounds

    Elise D'Haene

    Timothy Leary calls LICKING OUR WOUNDS "...poignant and hilarious: adventures simmering with passion, sweet sorrows, and raw, moist sexual expression rarely seen in literary works by women." It is the age of AIDS and Maria is just trying to survive. One by one her friends are dying, her lover has disappeared and Maria can't seem to figure out how to cope with her grief. Aided by Peter, a man living an elaborate lie, and Christie, a techno junkie with a unique version of truth, she discovers the depths of desire and the roots of longing. But only two men will be able to teach her about love and help Maria find the true woman inside. Erotic and emotional, LICKING OUR WOUNDS is an exploration of the female sexual soul.
  • The Lord Won't Mind by Gordon Merrick

    The Lord Won't Mind

    Gordon Merrick

    A four-month New York Times bestseller: This classic gay love story is as gripping and sexy today as when it was first published.

    Charlie Mills always played the role of the good grandson, and his grandmother rewarded him for it handsomely in the form of all the gifts, money, and attention a boy could want. Entering college in the late 1930s, Charlie just has to keep doing what his grandmother expects of him in order to continue to receive her gifts. He has to find a nice girl, get married, and have a few kids. Then one summer, he meets Peter Martin.

    Peter is everything that Charlie has ever wanted. Despite all the obstacles, Charlie immediately craves and pursues Peter, who happily obliges him. As they grow closer, Charlie is forced to choose between two options: complying with the expectations of society and family, or following the call of true love. In this, the first book of the Charlie & Peter Trilogy, Gordon Merrick creates an enduring portrait of two young men deeply in love, and the tribulations they endure to express themselves and maintain their relationship.

  • The Lotus Crew by Stewart Meyer

    The Lotus Crew

    Stewart Meyer

    Dope, duplicity, and violence fill this gasser of a novel from a protégé of William S. Burroughs

    Set in the scorched cityscape of the Reagan-era Lower East Side of Manhattan, The Lotus Crew is Stewart Meyer’s harrowing yet humorous tale of loyalty and betrayal in the face of heroin addiction. Two street junkies, the introverted Alvira and the gregarious Tommy, team up to spark a street-retailing crew pushing the best heroin in town. In the abandoned buildings and back alleys of an Alphabet City that is as dangerous as the Wild West, the stamp of the Triad crew on a glassine bag of dope means it’s a smoker.

    The duo is wildly successful until someone counterfeits the Triad seal and triggers a reaction from Tommy that leads to violence—and to a rude awakening for Alvira.
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