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  • Long Range Patrol by Dennis Foley

    Long Range Patrol

    Dennis Foley

    A searing novel of the war in Vietnam as seen through the eyes of a daring Long Range Patrol platoon leader

    Young and eager to prove himself, Ranger Lieutenant Jim Hollister leads his six-man reconnaissance team on risky missions deep into enemy territory. The special volunteers who make up Long Range Patrols are tasked with setting up ambushes and conducting dangerous night patrols, helicopter insertions behind enemy lines, and fire support in the hottest of fights.

    Enriched with a memorable cast of characters and thrilling details that only a Vietnam veteran could capture, Long Range Patrol is a powerhouse tale of a band of heroes fighting to keep their brothers alive.
  • Saigon by Anthony  Grey
    An epic saga of twentieth-century Vietnam: “This superb novel could well be the War and Peace of our age” (San Francisco Chronicle).
    Joseph Sherman first visits Saigon, the capital of French colonial Cochin-China, in 1925 on a hunting expedition with his father, a US senator. He is lured back again and again as a traveler, a soldier, and then as a reporter by his fascination for the exotic land and for Lan, a mandarin’s daughter he cannot forget.
    Over five decades Joseph’s life becomes enmeshed with the political intrigues of two of Saigon’s most influential families, the French colonist Devrauxs, and the native Trans—and inevitably with Vietnam’s turbulent, wartorn fate. He is there when the hatred of a million coolies rises against the French, and when the French Foreign Legion fights its bloody last stand at Dien Bien Phu. He sees US military “advisors” fire their first shots in America’s hopeless war against the red tide of Communist revolution and tries to salvage something of lasting value on a desperate helicopter flight out of defeated Saigon.
    At once a story of adventure, love, war, and political power, Saigon presents an enthralling and enlightening depiction of twentieth-century Vietnam.
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  • A Requiem for Crows by Dennis Foley

    A Requiem for Crows

    Dennis Foley

    A reluctant young draftee finds himself abandoned in combat during a turbulent era in America

    With “a bit of James Dean in his walk, Elvis in his smile and Jerry Lee Lewis in his attitude,” Scotty Hayes is an unlikely candidate for the army. But the draft board is about to turn his world upside down. Two months after Scotty hitches a ride from Belton, Florida, to Fort Benning in Georgia with exactly thirty-nine dollars in his pocket, the president is assassinated. And Scotty is suddenly facing combat in Vietnam.

    Now, Sergeant Hayes, accidental soldier, is at war against a new kind of enemy, fighting deadly AK-47 fire, the jungle, and treachery within his ranks. When a superior’s cowardice plunges Scotty into a hot zone with his comrades’ lives at stake, he must find an answer for the danger that threatens to engulf them all.

  • War Year by Joe Haldeman

    War Year

    Joe Haldeman

    A tour of duty through the worst that the world has to offer

    Before his time as a professor of writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, before penning multiple Nebula and Hugo Award–winning novels and stories, Joe Haldeman was a soldier in Vietnam, an experience that changed him and colored much of what he has written. War Year is Haldeman’s first novel and his first attempt to describe what he saw in Vietnam and give insight into what happened for the benefit of those who weren’t there.

    The minimalist War Year follows the life of John Farmer, a combat engineer, over the course of a year in Vietnam. John undergoes training, and then, along with his fellow soldiers, does whatever it takes to survive in unforgiving conditions.

    Powerful and affecting, War Year reaches its highest peaks as it describes with enduring truth the sights and experiences of what it was like to be in the humid jungles of Vietnam in 1968.

    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Joe Haldeman including rare images from the author’s personal collection.
  • Profane Men by Rex Miller

    Profane Men

    Rex Miller

    Profane Men brings the dark, creative, visionary energy of Slob, Chaingang, and other works by Rex Miller to a story set in Vietnam during the late 1960s. There have been many tales written about that troubled and troubling era, and Miller’s popular fiction work is clearly informed by personal experience relating to the war. In fact, this novel is filled with apparently autobiographical touches (the central narrator character has a developing career in broadcast radio, among other things). A rootless young man drifting through life faces the likelihood of being drafted and decides to choose his own destiny, seeking a way to avoid becoming cannon fodder. Unfortunately for him, he finds himself thrust into some of the worst corners of Vietnam, working with a team of assassins tracking a pirate radio broadcaster who seems to be supplying intelligence to the Viet Cong. And then things get complicated . . .

     

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  • Final Answers by Greg Dinallo

    Final Answers

    Greg Dinallo

    Greg Dinallo, the heralded author of Rockets’ Red Glare and Purpose of Evasion, has written his most chilling and disturbing thriller yet: A novel of intrigue that explores the emotionally charged issue of Vietnam War MIAs. Final Answers is provocative, authentic, and powerful fiction

    Among the 58,176 names etched on the long black wall of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, DC, are names of those who never came home—of MIAs whose families are still waiting for final answers.

    During a business trip to Washington, a veteran, now a statistics expert, has an experience at the Memorial that will shatter his carefully constructed life with the impact of a Claymore mine. Touching the names carved in the wall, he finds one all too familiar: his own. A. Calvert Morgan understands cold, hard numbers. But how did his name get on the wall? Morgan’s wife, Nancy, does some research for him that leads him to Kate Ackerman. Kate’s husband had been listed as missing in action after being shot down in Laos twenty years earlier; during those years, she has joined the National League of Families and become a dedicated MIA activist.

    At first, Morgan believes that he is part of a bizarre military snafu—a data entry error made in the field. But when Kate guides him to the Army’s Central Identification Lab in Hawaii, he begins to realize that his “death” was not an accident. In the war zone, another man took his name and serial number for his own —and then was killed. Morgan finds out that his impersonator was no ordinary GI He was, in fact, a key player in a macabre conspiracy that reaches back to the poppy fields of Laos.

    Morgan has set off a deadly alarm; the drug lord is still operating and has targeted him for elimination. Coming after Morgan—a man more comfortable with a computer than a handgun—the hit man commits a murder so brutal that Morgan’s life is turned into a raging fight for survival.

    From the San Francisco mortuary that received the bodies of American servicemen during the war to Southeast Asia in the ’90s, Morgan is venturing into ever more violent territory. And he is not alone. Kate Ackerman has joined him on a trip to Thailand—hopeful that her husband is still alive, his fate possibly linked to those who have targeted Morgan for death.

    Amid Bangkok’s steamy nightclubs and brackish, twisting canals, their quest pushes them into the jungle, across the Mekong River into Laos, where they move toward a brutal final answer to the mystery of Vietnam MIAs . . .

    Electrifying and filled with suspense, Final Answers confirms Greg Dinallo’s reputation as a novelist who poses daring questions, takes extraordinary risks, and delivers searing excitement from first page to last.

  • Starlight by Scott Ely

    Starlight

    Scott Ely

    In the depths of Vietnam’s jungles, a radioman and a haunted sniper try to survive
    Jackson has three hundred days left in Vietnam, and he plans to spend them behind a desk, working the radio for a major in a godforsaken firebase not far from the Laos border. But one day, the reality of war visits Jackson in the form of Tom Light, a sniper whose scope is said to have the power to raise the dead. Where Light goes, ambushes follow, and so he has been cursed to wander the jungle alone, his skin growing pale, his boots replaced with sandals.
    Tom Light is a dangerous man to know, a spooky lost soldier who survives in spite of himself. Jackson wants to learn his secret. Hoping the master sniper can keep him safe, Jackson ventures out with Light. In the jungle they will encounter perils—some real and some hallucinatory. Can the strange sniper’s all-powerful starlight scope will them to stay alive?

  • Tiger the Lurp Dog by Kenn Miller

    Tiger the Lurp Dog

    Kenn Miller

    A landmark novel of the Vietnam War

    The men of the Long-Range Reconnaissance Patrol—Stagg, Wolverine, Mopar, Marvel Kim, and Gonzales—are commando-style soldiers, called “Lurps” for short. Five men, completely dependent on one another. Proud to the point of arrogance. They’re joined by Tiger, their mascot: a flea-bitten scavenging stray or “dust dog,” a sneak and a coward, lazy and haughty. But, like his masters in this dirtiest of all wars, a survivor.When their buddies on Team Two-One disappear, the Lurp team members have to fight their own brass to go on a mission to find them. And suddenly a grueling war becomes an unimaginable nightmare.
  • Soldier's Joy by Madison Smartt Bell

    Soldier's Joy

    Madison Smartt Bell

    Two Southern soldiers, recently back from Vietnam, struggle to resume their lives amid dangerous and deep-rooted prejudice

    Thomas Laidlaw returns home from Vietnam with nothing much in mind but to tend his acreage, live apart, and get lost in the roots music he grew up with. Laidlaw’s childhood friend Rodney Redmon is doubly burdened: Not only is he scarred from the war, he is also a black man living in a prejudiced area of Tennessee. Redmon’s homecoming from the war included time in jail—the result of his being framed for real estate fraud by racist forces within the local establishment. Once released, he and Laidlaw rekindle their friendship and both veterans try to put the war behind them. But when a group of local Klansman emerges, the violence that haunts them may prove impossible to escape. Masterful in its execution and stunning in its emotional resonance, Soldier’s Joy is a riveting portrait of two damaged souls struggling to achieve solace despite the demons of their past.

  • 1968 by Joe Haldeman
    “So many tensions and so much emotion . . . A powerful novel” of the Vietnam era by the award-winning author of The Forever War (Booklist).

    John “Spider” Spiedel is a college dropout who is drafted into the war as a combat engineer. Scared, he tries to keep his head down and stay safe, a plan that works until the Tet Offensive, when he is wounded and sent stateside—and receives a devastating diagnosis. And while he’s been away fighting, his girlfriend, Beverly, has fallen in with the hippie movement in an attempt to rebel against the repressive values of American society and the injustice of the war that took her boyfriend overseas.

    Vietnam was the conflict that changed America’s relationship with war forever, and this novel by Nebula and Hugo Award–winning author Joe Haldeman, inspired by his own experience in the military, is a look at this turbulent time in US history as seen through the eyes of the people most affected: the soldiers and their loved ones. 1968 is not just a story of two young people attempting to find themselves in a tumultuous world—it’s the account of a country trying to find itself as well.

    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Joe Haldeman including rare images from the author’s personal collection.
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  • The Lieutenant by Andre Dubus

    The Lieutenant

    Andre Dubus

    Andre Dubus’s controversial debut: A revealing novel of men at war—with themselves
    At sea aboard a Navy aircraft carrier, Lieutenant Daniel Tierney finds himself in direct command of his Marine Corps detachment for the first time. Soon, a minor infraction committed by promising young PFC Ted Freeman has expanded into a thorough investigation of initiation rituals and homosexual activity on the ship. Torn between his desire to protect Freeman and his obligation to safeguard the Marines' reputation, Tierney must come to terms with the diminishment of his faith in a system he had once idealized. Dubus's sole novel, The Lieutenant exposes the culture and politics of the United States military at the start of the Vietnam War, and reveals the common insecurities of the men whose lives were defined in its bounds. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Andre Dubus including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s estate.
  • How Can You Mend This Purple Heart by T. L. Gould

    How Can You Mend This Purple Heart

    T. L. Gould

    Winner of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation’s James Webb Award for distinguished fiction

    In this riveting first novel, author T. L. Gould draws on his experiences in a military hospital with severely wounded Marines recovering from the Vietnam War. He has created a plain-truth, no-holds-barred narrative, stark in its simplicity, detail, and humor. From dressing changes and morphine drips to off-site forays under a fence and into neighborhood bars and brothels, Gould chronicles the precipitous journey to recovery of the men of Ward 2B: how they learned to walk again, to love again, and to triumph over crippling injuries.

    How Can You Mend This Purple Heart is not a story about combat in the jungles of Vietnam. It is a story about boys who returned from combat as men—men who left the better part of their youth, a bit of their souls, and a lot of their flesh in a battlefield on the other side of the world. It’s a story about their longing to recapture the spirit of boyhood and rekindle the optimism and fearlessness of youth. And it’s about their struggle to be whole again—or at the very least, to feel whole. It chronicles a journey of love, redemption, sorrow, and joy; a journey of pain and anger . . . and a journey of hope. But most of all, a journey of the human spirit and its triumph over the most impossible odds.

    How Can You Mend This Purple Heart is a tribute to all the combat-wounded veterans of past and present conflicts. May they find the strength to continue their lives’ missions and know that the entire nation is grateful for their sacrifices.

  • Coming Down Again by John Balaban

    Coming Down Again

    John Balaban

    Based on a true story: A magnificent portrayal of chaos, darkness, and adventure in Asia's Golden Triangle as the war wages in VietnamAdrift at the end of the Vietnam War, Paul Roberts and his girlfriend, Fay, are arrested at the Burmese-Thai border for smuggling a couple of ounces of hashish. Stranded in a small Thai prison, they become part of a grisly contest played out by opium warlords, corrupt border patrol police, and two AWOL GIs. The war echoes through their intrigues and jailbreak attempts, especially when a regiment of North Vietnamese joins the skirmish.
    Transcending the adventure story, John Balaban’s lyric prose conjures beautiful and frightening images, evoking the Golden Triangle’s jungle as well as the complex hazards of the opium trade.
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  • Army Blue by Lucian K. Truscott IV

    In the eagerly anticipated follow-up to his first novel, Dress Gray, Truscott turns his attention to the Vietnam War and delivers a suspenseful, sprawling court-martial drama set in Saigon in 1969.

    At twenty-three, platoon leader Lt. Matthew Nelson Blue is the youngest member of an army family; his father is a colonel and his grandfather a profane, cantankerous retired general. Shortly after one of his men is killed by friendly fire while on routine patrol, Blue is arrested and charged with desertion in the face of the enemy. Arriving in Vietnam, his father and grandfather end their long estrangement and join forces to clear the young soldier’s name. Truscott’s plot offers less than initially meets the eye; the nature of the conspiracy and cover-up that nearly destroy Blue is fairly easy to predict, as is the disillusionment about Vietnam that eventually befalls his seniors.

    The author’s intimate portrayal of the texture of army life gives his narrative a more deeply felt sense of anger and regret than others in its genre, and makes its final revelations more powerful than they might otherwise have been.

  • Saigon, Illinois by Paul Hoover

    Saigon, Illinois

    Paul Hoover

    The story of how one man wound up fighting the Vietnam War from a Chicago hospital

    Young slacker Jim Holder wants no part of the draft, the army, or Vietnam. So he registers as a conscientious objector and gets ready for alternative service. He’s assigned to work as a unit manager at a downtown Chicago medical center, worlds apart from his rural roots. A wild assortment of patients and colleagues awaits him at Metropolitan Hospital. As Jim’s life swings from the chaos of his job to the fervor of a revolutionary moment, he balances his beliefs with the everyday business of life and death.

    In this richly comic novel, Paul Hoover crystallizes the strange days of the conflict in Vietnam with a memorable cast of characters.

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  • Another War, Another Peace by Ronald J. Glasser

    Another War, Another Peace

    Ronald J. Glasser

    The powerful story of an unlikely friendship and a doctor’s re-education on the battlefields of the Vietnam War
    Fresh out of medical school and planning to enter academia, David pragmatically applies to serve in the US Army, thinking he would rather work in a stateside military hospital than get drafted. But when he gets reassigned to Southeast Asia, he suddenly finds himself on a base in Vietnam. He joins a civilian aid mission on a supposedly secure plateau, and spends his days dispensing pills to villagers. As David comes to terms with the unexpected factors that brought him to Vietnam, he must adjust to many more twists and turns—among them his relationship with his driver, Tom, a young, rough-hewn Southerner whose reticence feels unnervingly like indifference. Gradually, however, David sees that there’s far more to Tom than he initially thought. As their friendship grows, David also realizes that his fellow doctors and the troops on base hold widely diverging opinions about the war and its objectives. As it becomes clear that their base is located on a key strategic route—the notorious Ho Chi Minh Trail—and thus a vulnerable target, it’s only a matter of time before battles break out . . .
  • Easy and Hard Ways Out by Robert Grossbach

    Easy and Hard Ways Out

    Robert Grossbach

    An underachieving engineer building a fighter plane faces a life-changing decision in this Vietnam-era novel perfect for fans of Kurt Vonnegut, Joshua Ferris, and Joseph Heller.

    This furious, slapstick tale has been praised by the New York Times as one of the “best and brightest” novels about the Vietnam War. We follow the travails of Harvey Brank and his fellow employees, all undrafted malcontents working in a spectacularly small-minded, almost Kafkaesque engineering company. Assigned to build a fighter plane and drawn into office intrigues, Brank faces impossible demands. His wife, despairing of his patchy employment history and restlessness, hopes against hope that Brank won’t get himself fired this time. But what do you do when everything conspires against your vision of a decent, peaceable life?

    Easy and Hard Ways Out is a blunt, freewheeling look at the men who stay home during wartime—a story about the everyday, with a timeless moral at its heart.

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  • We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young by Lt. Gen. Harold G.  Moore [Ret]

    We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young

    Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore [Ret]

    The New York Times bestseller, hailed as a “powerful and epic story . . . the best account of infantry combat I have ever read, and the most significant book to come out of the Vietnam War” by Col. David Hackworth, author of the bestseller About Face

    In November 1965, some 450 men of the First Battalion, Seventh Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Harold Moore, were dropped into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was brutally slaughtered. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War. They were the first major engagements between the US Army and the People’s Army of Vietnam.

    How these Americans persevered—sacrificing themselves for their comrades and never giving up—creates a vivid portrait of war at its most devastating and inspiring. Lt. Gen. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway—the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting—interviewed hundreds of men who fought in the battle, including the North Vietnamese commanders. Their poignant account rises above the ordeal it chronicles to depict men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have once found unimaginable. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man’s most heroic and horrendous endeavor.
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  • Valor in Vietnam by Allen B. Clark

    Valor in Vietnam

    Allen B. Clark

    Every war continues to dwell in the lives it touched, in the lives of those living through that time, and in those absorbed by its historical significance. The Vietnam War lives on—famously or infamously, depending on political points of view—but those who have “been there, done that” have a highly personalized window on their time of that history. Valor in Vietnam focuses on nineteen stories of Vietnam, stories of celebrated figures in the veteran community, compelling war narratives, vignettes of battles, and the emotional impact on the combatants. It is replete with leadership lessons and valuable insights that are just as applicable today as they were forty years ago. This is an anecdotal history of America’s war in Vietnam composed of firsthand narratives by Vietnam War veterans presented in chronological order. They are intense, emotional, and highly personal stories. Connecting each of them is a brief historical commentary of that period of the war, the geography of the story, and the contemporary strategy written by Lewis Sorley, West Point class of 1956, and author of A Better War and Westmoreland. With a foreword by Lt. Gen. Dave R. Palmer, US Army (Ret.), Valor in Vietnam presents an overview of the war through the eyes of participants in each branch of service and throughout the entire course of the war. Simply put, their stories serve to reflect the commitment, honor, and dedication with which America’s veterans performed their service.

  • Goodbye Vietnam by William Broyles

    Goodbye Vietnam

    William Broyles

    In this gripping memoir, a former marine returns to Vietnam to try to make sense of the war. Previously published as Brothers in Arms, this edition includes a new preface by the author.
    When William Broyles Jr. was drafted, he was a twenty-four-year-old student at Oxford University in England, hoping to avoid military service. During his physical exam, however, he realized that he couldn’t let social class or education give him special privileges. He joined the marines, and soon commanded an infantry platoon in the foothills near Da Nang. More than a decade later, Broyles found himself flooded with emotion during the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. He decided to return to Vietnam and confront what he’d been through. Broyles was one of the very first combat veterans to return to the battlefields. No American before or since has gone so deeply into the other side of the war: the enemy side. Broyles interviews dozens of Vietnamese, from the generals who ran the war to the men and women who fought it. He moves from the corridors of power in Hanoi—so low-tech that the plumbing didn’t work—to the jungles and rice paddies where he’d fought. He meets survivors of American B-52 strikes and My Lai, and grieves with a woman whose son was killed by his own platoon. Along the way, Broyles also explores the deep bonds he shared with his own comrades, and the mystery of why men love war even as they hate it. Amidst the landscape of death, his formerly faceless enemies come to life. They had once tried to kill each other, but they are all brothers now.
  • 365 Days by Ronald J. Glasser
    The classic and heartrending account of the Vietnam War as seen through the eyes of an army doctor
    In 1968, as a serviceman in the Vietnam War, Dr. Ronald Glasser was sent to Japan to work at the US Army hospital at Camp Zama. It was the only general army hospital in Japan, and though Glasser was initially charged with tending to the children of officers and government officials, he was soon caught up in the waves of casualties that poured in from every Vietnam front. Thousands of soldiers arrived each month, demanding the help of every physician within reach. In 365 Days, Glasser reveals a candid and shocking account of that harrowing experience. He gives voice to seventeen of his patients, wounded men counting down the days until they return home. Their stories bring to life a world of incredible bravery and suffering, one where “the young are suddenly left alone to take care of the young.” An instant classic of war literature, 365 Days is a remarkable, ground-level account of Vietnam’s human toll.
  • Hal Moore by Mike Guardia

    Hal Moore

    Mike Guardia

    The definitive biography of Harold G. Moore, hero of the Vietnam War and author of the bestselling memoir of the battle at Ia Drang.

    Hal Moore, one of the most admired American combat leaders of the last fifty years, has until now been best known to the public for being portrayed by Mel Gibson in the movie We Were Soldiers. In this first-ever, fully illustrated biography, we finally learn the full story of one of America’s true military heroes.
    A 1945 graduate of West Point, Moore’s first combats occurred during the Korean War, where he fought in the battles of Old Baldy, T-Bone, and Pork Chop Hill. At the beginning of the Vietnam War, Moore commanded the 1st Battalion of the 7th Cavalry in the first full-fledged battle between US and North Vietnamese regulars. Drastically outnumbered and nearly overrun, Moore led from the front, and though losing seventy-nine soldiers, accounted for 1,200 of the enemy before the Communists withdrew. This Battle of Ia Drang pioneered the use of “air mobile infantry”—delivering troops into battle via helicopter—which became the staple of US operations for the remainder of the war. He later wrote of his experiences in the bestselling book We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young.
    Following his tour in Vietnam, he assumed command of the 7th Infantry Division, forward-stationed in South Korea, and in 1971, he took command of the Army Training Center at Fort Ord, California. In this capacity, he oversaw the US Army’s transition from a conscript-based to an all-volunteer force. He retired as a lieutenant general in 1977.
    Hal Moore graciously allowed the author interviews and granted full access to his files and collection of letters, documents, and never-before-published photographs.
  • Da Nang Diary by Thomas R. Yarborough

    Da Nang Diary

    Thomas R. Yarborough

    Originally published in 1991, this classic work has now been revised and updated with additional photos, many of them in color. It is the story of how, in Vietnam, an elite group of Air Force pilots fought a secret air war in Cessna 0-2 and OV-10 Bronco prop planes—flying as low as they could get. The eyes and ears of the fast-moving jets who rained death and destruction down on enemy positions, the forward air controller made an art form out of an air strike—knowing the targets, knowing where friendly troops were, and reacting with split-second, life-and-death decisions as a battle unfolded.
    The expertise of the low, slow FACs, as well as the hazard attendant to their role, made for a unique bird’s-eye perspective on how the entire war in Vietnam unfolded. For Tom Yarborough, who logged 1,500 hours of combat flying time, the risk was constant, intense, and electrifying. A member of the super-secret “Prairie Fire” unit, Yarborough became one of the most frequently shot-up pilots flying out of Da Nang—engaging in a series of dangerous secret missions in Laos. In this work, the reader flies in the cockpit alongside Yarborough in his adrenaline-pumping chronicle of heroism, danger, and wartime brotherhood. From the rescuing of downed pilots to taking out enemy positions, to the most harrowing extended missions directly overhead of the NVA, here is the dedication, courage and skill of the fliers who took the war into the enemy’s backyard.
  • The Phoenix Program by Douglas Valentine

    The Phoenix Program

    Douglas Valentine

    A shocking exposé of the covert CIA program of widespread torture, rape, and murder of civilians during America’s war in Vietnam, with a new introduction by the author

    In the darkest days of the Vietnam War, America’s Central Intelligence Agency secretly initiated a sweeping program of kidnap, torture, and assassination devised to destabilize the infrastructure of the National Liberation Front (NLF) of South Vietnam, commonly known as the “Viet Cong.” The victims of the Phoenix Program were Vietnamese civilians, male and female, suspected of harboring information about the enemy—though many on the blacklist were targeted by corrupt South Vietnamese security personnel looking to extort money or remove a rival. Between 1965 and 1972, more than eighty thousand noncombatants were “neutralized,” as men and women alike were subjected to extended imprisonment without trial, horrific torture, brutal rape, and in many cases execution, all under the watchful eyes of US government agencies.

    Based on extensive research and in-depth interviews with former participants and observers, Douglas Valentine’s startling exposé blows the lid off of what was possibly the bloodiest and most inhumane covert operation in the CIA’s history.

    The ebook edition includes “The Phoenix Has Landed,” a new introduction that addresses the “Phoenix-style network” that constitutes America’s internal security apparatus today. Residents on American soil are routinely targeted under the guise of protecting us from terrorism—which is why, more than ever, people need to understand what Phoenix is all about.
  • Forsaken Warriors by Robert Tonsetic

    Forsaken Warriors

    Robert Tonsetic

    An inside account of the South Vietnamese elites who strove to carry on the war against the Communists during the US Army’s withdrawal . . . The book is a personal memoir of the author’s service as a US Army advisor during the end stages of America’s involvement in Vietnam. During the period 1970–71, the US was beginning to draw down its combat forces, and the new watchword was “Vietnamization.” It was the period when the will of the US to prosecute the war had slipped, and transferring responsibility to the South Vietnamese was the only remaining hope for victory. The author served as a US Army advisor to South Vietnamese Ranger and Airborne units during this critical period. The units that the author advised spearheaded several campaigns in South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, as the US combat units withdrew. Often outnumbered and outgunned, the elite Ranger and Airborne units fought Viet Cong and North Vietnamese units in some of the most difficult terrain in Southeast Asia, ranging from the legendary U Minh forest and Mo So mountains in the Mekong Delta to the rugged hills of southern Laos. The role of the small US advisory teams is fully explained in the narrative. With little support from higher headquarters, these teams accompanied the Vietnamese units on highly dangerous combat operations over which they had no command or control authority. When US advisors were restricted from accompanying South Vietnamese forces on cross-border operations in Cambodia and especially Laos, the South Vietnamese forces were badly mauled, raising concerns about their readiness and training, and their ability to operate without their US advisors. As a result, a major effort was placed on training these forces, while the clock continued to run on the US withdrawal. Having served with a US infantry battalion during the peak years of the US involvement in Vietnam, Robert Tonsetic—the acclaimed author of Days of Valor—is able to view the war through two different prisms and offer criticisms and an awareness of the South Vietnamese armed forces were ultimately defeated.

  • Prodigals by Richard Taylor

    Prodigals

    Richard Taylor

    This well-written combat memoir is heartfelt, earnest, honest, and melancholy—a poignant look at two intense tours in Vietnam. During his first tour in Vietnam, from 1967 to 1968, Dick Taylor was a well-trained and highly motivated amateur assigned to advise a hard-bitten Army of the Republic of Vietnam infantry battalion working in the mud and streams of IV Corps. He became savvy in a hurry and found that he was both brave and resourceful. He barely survived the Tet Offensive of 1968, and then served on an advisory team staff. For the next two years, Taylor earned a Ranger tab, served on a division staff, and schooled on. He met his wife, and married her days before he returned to Vietnam. Taylor’s second tour, from 1970 to 1971, was altogether different. He immediately assumed command of Bravo Company, 1/7 Cav, and excelled as a commander and a leader. He was aggressive in the field, confident in his command, and assertive with his superiors. He fought a good war, a successful war, and when he was forced to take a staff job it was as his battalion’s intelligence officer. But the war was winding down, its purpose lost. Taylor’s spirit’s flagged, but not his fidelity.

  • 12, 20 & 5 by John Parrish

    12, 20 & 5

    John Parrish

    The wry and heart-wrenching memoir of a young doctor’s year behind the frontlines in Vietnam.
    Assigned to the marine camp at Phu Bai, Dr. John A. Parrish confronted all manner of medical trauma, quickly shedding the naïveté of a new medical intern. With this memoir, he crafts a haunting, humane portrait of one man’s agonizing confrontation with war. With a wife and two children awaiting his return home, the young physician lives through the most turbulent and formative year of his life—and finds himself molded into a true doctor by the raw tragedy of the battlefield. His endless work is punctuated only by the arrival of the next helicopter bearing more casualties, and the stark announcements: “12 litter-borne wounded, 20 ambulatory wounded, and 5 dead.”

    12, 20 & 5 is an intimate and unique look at the effects of war that Library Journal calls “an autobiographical M*A*S*H* . . . phenomenal.”

  • LBJ's Hired Gun by John J. Gebhart

    LBJ's Hired Gun

    John J. Gebhart

    Many Vietnam memoirs have appeared in recent years, but not a single one has the humor, pathos, poignancy, and often sheer hilarity of John J. Gebhart’s riveting LBJ’s Hired Gun. As Gebhart tells it, he was a “smart-mouthed college boy” who joined the Marines to see the world and “dust a few black pajamas for Uncle Sam.” Two grueling tours of duty later (1965–1967), he returned home as a sergeant after surviving 240 combat missions (12 air medals) and being shot down twice. On his chest was the Navy Commendation Award (with the combat V). LBJ’s Hired Gun launches with Gebhart’s grim recollection of the intense, old-school brutality that was Marine Corps training on Parris Island before transitioning to his difficult journey for Southeast Asia aboard a troop transport with two thousand other nameless grunts. These hardships offered but a glimpse of the suffering he and his comrades were about to endure. His candid account of life and death in Vietnam is written with a lively, infectious flair. But be forewarned: No attempt has been made to sanitize this memoir with politically correct language. Gebhart tells his story exactly as he and his comrades spoke in the 1960s. The result is a gripping, no-holds-barred memoir of his “misadventures in-country.” He spares no detail and no one in his effort to convey exactly what he and his comrades experienced in Vietnam. Here is how the author describes Vietnam: “What was not to like about Vietnam? It was a tropical paradise filled with lush green forests and mountains, endless rice paddies, and beautiful beaches with clear green water. You get all the free ammunition you want, endless cold beer to drink, and boom-boom girls to party with. Who could ask for more? Of course, there were some minor problems like all the VCs and NVAs who wanted to kill us. Everyone counted the days they had left before rotating back to the land of the big PX. I was having such a great vacation I signed up for another 12-month tour. I spent twenty-four action-filled months dusting VCs and NVAs, rescuing reconnaissance teams, flying LZ prep missions, delivering mail to bases where you came in shooting and flew out the same way. Somewhere along the line they decided I should be decorated for killing the enemy.” This is not just another book about Vietnam written by an officer. LBJ’s Hired Gun is the story of an enlisted man who lived on a dead-end street in West Philadelphia, intent on lifting your spirits and putting a smile on your face as you journey with him across the world and meet the people, explore the places, and relive the events that shaped Marine Corps history in Vietnam from September 1965 to September 1967. There are many outstanding Vietnam memoirs. LBJ’s Hired Gun stands heads and shoulders above them all.

  • Marine Corps Tank Battles in Vietnam by Oscar E. Gilbert

    Marine Corps Tank Battles in Vietnam

    Oscar E. Gilbert

    In 1965 the large, loud, and highly visible tanks of 3rd Platoon, B Company, 3rd Tank Battalion landed across a beach near Da Nang, drawing unwelcome attention to America’s first, almost covert, commitment of ground troops in South Vietnam. As the Marine Corps presence grew inexorably, the 1st and 3rd Tank Battalions, as well as elements of the reactivated 5th Tank Battalion, were committed to the conflict. For the United States Marine Corps, the protracted and bloody struggle was marked by controversy, but for Marine Corps tankers it was marked by bitter frustration as they saw their own high levels of command turn their backs on some of the hardest-won lessons of tank-infantry cooperation learned in the Pacific War and in Korea. Nevertheless, like good Marines, the officers and enlisted men of the tank battalions sought out the enemy in the sand dunes, jungles, mountains, paddy fields, tiny villages, and ancient cities of Vietnam. Young Marine tankers fresh out of training, and cynical veterans of the Pacific War and Korea, battled two enemies. The battle-hardened Viet Cong were masters of the art of striking hard, then slipping away to fight another day. The highly motivated troops of the North Vietnamese Army, equipped with long-range artillery and able to flee across nearby borders into sanctuaries where the Marines were forbidden to follow, engaged the Marines in brutal conventional combat. Both foes were equipped with modern anti-tank weapons, and sought out the tanks as valuable symbolic targets. It was a brutal and schizophrenic war, with no front and no rear, absolutely no respite from constant danger, against a merciless foe hidden among a helpless civilian population. Some of the duties the tankers were called upon to perform were long familiar, as they provided firepower and mobility for the suffering infantry in a never-ending succession of search and destroy operations, conducted amphibious landings, and added their heavy guns to the artillery in fire support missions. Under constant threat of ambushes and huge command-detonated mines that could obliterate both tank and crew in an instant, the tankers escorted vital supply convoys, and guarded the engineers who built and maintained the roads. In their “spare time” the tankers guarded lonely bridges and isolated outposts for weeks on end, patrolled on foot to seek out the Viet Cong, operated roadblocks and ambushes, shot up boats to interdict the enemy’s supply lines, and worked in the villages and hamlets to better the lives of the brutalized civilians. To the bitter end—despite the harsh conditions of climate and terrain, confusion, endless savage and debilitating combat, and ultimate frustration as their own nation turned against the war—the Marine tankers routinely demonstrated the versatility, dedication to duty, and matchless courage that Americans have come to expect of their Marines.

  • The First Battle by Otto Lehrack

    The First Battle

    Otto Lehrack

    The First Battle is a graphic account of the first major clash of the Vietnam War. On August 18, 1965, regiment fought regiment on the Van Tuong Peninsula near the new Marine base at Chu Lai. On the American side were three battalions of Marines under the command of Colonel Oscar Peatross, a hero of two previous wars. His opponent was the 1st Viet Cong Regiment commanded by Nguyen Dinh Trong, a veteran of many fights against the French and the South Vietnamese. Codenamed Operation Starlite, this action was a resounding success for the Marines and its result was cause for great optimism about America’s future in Vietnam. Those expecting a book about Americans in battle will not be disappointed by the detailed descriptions of how the fight unfolded. Marine participants from private to colonel were interviewed during the book’s research phase. The battle is seen from the mud level by those who were at the point of the spear. But this is not just another war story told exclusively from the American side. In researching the book, the author talked with and walked the battlefield with men who fought with the 1st Viet Cong Regiment. All were accomplished combat veterans years before the U.S. entry into the war. The reader is planted squarely in America in 1965, the year that truly began the long American involvement. Operation Starlite sent the Vietnam War into the headlines across the nation and into the minds of Americans, where it took up residence for more than a decade. Starlite was the first step in Vietnam’s becoming America’s tar baby. The subtitle of the book is: Operation Starlite and the Beginning of the Blood Debt in Vietnam. Blood debt, han tu in Vietnamese, can mean revenge, debt of honor, or blood owed for blood spilled. The Blood Debt came into Vietnamese usage early in the war with the United States. With this battle, the Johnson Administration began compiling its own blood debt, this one to the American people. The book also looks at the ongoing conflict between the US Army and the US Marines about the methodology of the Vietnam War. With decades of experience with insurrection and rebellion, the Marines were institutionally oriented to base the struggle on pacification of the population. The Army, on the other hand, having largely trained to meet the Soviet Army on the plains of Germany, opted for search-and-destroy missions against Communist main force units. The history of the Vietnam War is littered with many “what if’s.” This may be the biggest of them.

  • Casualties of War by Daniel Lang

    Casualties of War

    Daniel Lang

    The searing account of a war crime and one soldier’s heroic efforts to bring the perpetrators to justice

    First published in the New Yorker in 1969 and later adapted into an acclaimed film starring Michael J. Fox and Sean Penn, Casualties of War is the shocking true story of the abduction, rape, and murder of a young Vietnamese woman by US soldiers.

    Before setting out on a five-day reconnaissance mission in the Central Highlands of South Vietnam, Sergeant Tony Meserve told the four men under his command that their first objective would be to kidnap a girl and bring her along “for the morale of the squad.” At the end of the mission, Meserve said, they would kill their victim and dispose of the body to avoid prosecution for abduction and rape—capital crimes in the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

    Private First Class Sven Eriksson was the only member of the patrol who refused to participate in the atrocity. Haunted by his inability to save the young woman’s life, he vowed to see Meserve and the others convicted of their crimes. Faced with the cynical indifference of his commanding officers and outright hostility from his fellow infantrymen, Eriksson had the tenacity to persevere. He went on to serve as the government’s chief witness in four courts-martial related to the infamous Incident on Hill 192.

    A masterpiece of contemporary journalism, Casualties of War is a clear-eyed, powerfully affecting portrait of the horrors of warfare and the true meaning of courage.
  • Eagles Cry Blood by Donald E. Zlotnik

    Eagles Cry Blood

    Donald E. Zlotnik

    While too many soldiers are fighting for the brass in the midst of the bloody Vietnam battles, Lt. Paul Bourne is compelled to fight the enemy for his country’s freedom. But when he comes up against his captain--a man driven by selfishness and a desire for recognition and glory, Bourne is even more determined to destroy the enemy--even if this means sacrificing his life.

  • Vietnam by Mary McCarthy

    Hailed as “the most provocative and disturbing analytical indictment . . . of America’s role in Vietnam” by the New York Times, this is Mary McCarthy’s riveting account of her journeys to Saigon and Hanoi
    In 1967, the editor of the New York Review of Books sent Mary McCarthy to Vietnam. In this daring and incisive account, McCarthy brings her critical thinking and novelist’s eye to one of the most unpopular wars in our nation’s history.
    Outraged over America’s role in the Vietnam War, McCarthy arrived in Saigon with her own preconceived notions. Her time there did little to alter those beliefs. Focusing on the moral consequences—“the worst thing that could happen to our country would be to win this war”—McCarthy provides firsthand reports from the front line. She describes visits to villages built for Vietnamese refugees torn between the terror that Americans would stay and the fear that they would go.
    From its coverage of the daily horrors of war to notes on the logistical challenge of bringing 494,000 soldiers home, this is a timely and timeless work from one of America’s most outspoken and respected critics.
    This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author’s estate.

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