header-img-1024
    • Tempted Women by Carol Botwin

      Tempted Women

      Carol Botwin

      Over the past ten years, the number of wives who have affairs has grown dramatically—recent surveys suggest by as much as 50 percent. Yet in all the acres of space devoted to male infidelity, so far this has been a largely untouched subject. In this guide, Carol Botwin—advice columnist, therapist, and author—rushes to help rather than condemn. Drawing from six hundred interviews and case histories—with both husbands and wives—Botwin examines causes, initial attractions, affairs in progress, endings, and aftermaths. Throughout, she offers her experienced advice and solutions on how to deal with a lover, children, and husband after the affair has dealt a devastating blow to the marriage. Other books by the author include Men Who Can’t be Faithful and Is There Sex After Marriage?

    • Against Our Will by Susan Brownmiller

      Against Our Will

      Susan Brownmiller

      Susan Brownmiller’s groundbreaking bestseller uncovers the culture of violence against women with a devastating exploration of the history of rape—now with a new preface by the author exposing the undercurrents of rape still present today
      Rape, as author Susan Brownmiller proves in her startling and important book, is not about sex but about power, fear, and subjugation. For thousands of years, it has been viewed as an acceptable “spoil of war,” used as a weapon by invading armies to crush the will of the conquered. The act of rape against women has long been cloaked in lies and false justifications.
      It is ignored, tolerated, even encouraged by governments and military leaders, misunderstood by police and security organizations, freely employed by domineering husbands and lovers, downplayed by medical and legal professionals more inclined to “blame the victim,” and, perhaps most shockingly, accepted in supposedly civilized societies worldwide, including the United States.
      Against Our Will is a classic work that has been widely credited with changing prevailing attitudes about violence against women by awakening the public to the true and continuing tragedy of rape around the globe and throughout the ages.
      Selected by the New York Times Book Review as an Outstanding Book of the Year and included among the New York Public Library’s Books of the Century, Against Our Will remains an essential work of sociological and historical importance.

    • Dawn by Octavia E. Butler
      An alien race calls on one woman to revive mankind after Earth’s apocalypse in this science fiction classic from the award-winning author of Parable of the Sower.
      Lilith Iyapo has just lost her husband and son when atomic fire consumes Earth—the last stage of the planet’s final war. Hundreds of years later Lilith awakes, deep in the hold of a massive alien spacecraft piloted by the Oankali—who arrived just in time to save humanity from extinction. They have kept Lilith and other survivors asleep for centuries, as they learned whatever they could about Earth. Now it is time for Lilith to lead them back to her home world, but life among the Oankali on the newly resettled planet will be nothing like it was before. The Oankali survive by genetically merging with primitive civilizations—whether their new hosts like it or not. For the first time since the nuclear holocaust, Earth will be inhabited. Grass will grow, animals will run, and people will learn to survive the planet’s untamed wilderness. But their children will not be human. Not exactly.

      Featuring strong and compelling characters and exploring complex themes of gender and species, Octavia E. Butler presents a powerful, postapocalyptic interplanetary epic, as well as a ray of hope for humanity. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Wounded to Death by Serena Dandini

      Wounded to Death

      Serena Dandini

      The voices too many women have lost; the dreams too many men have destroyed

      In these monologues originally written for theatrical performance, women who were victims of murder regain their voices to tell their truths. One woman, her body unceremoniously dumped in a well by her husband, laments the police force’s halfhearted investigation of her murder. Another, forced to toil ceaselessly for a meager few euros per month, grows weary of enduring daily beatings and attempted rape and hangs herself from a crystal chandelier. Inspired by true events, these monologues represent what the victims of femicide might say, had they not been robbed of their voices.

      First staged as a play in 2012 in Palermo, Italy, Wounded to Death has taken Italy and the world by storm. Alongside the powerfully imagined speeches in this edition, Serena Dandini presents the grim global statistics of violence against women. This essential book showcases the author’s exceptional capacity for creating nuanced emotion, from comic to painful, from grotesque to dramatic. With a factual basis and cinematic flair, these works compel the reader to consider the violence that is taking place right now all over the world.

    • Virginia Woolf by Ruth Gruber

      Virginia Woolf

      Ruth Gruber

      Gruber’s groundbreaking study of the work and legacy of Virginia Woolf—an enduring feminist analysis pairing two of the twentieth century’s most extraordinary writers
      In 1932, Ruth Gruber earned her PhD—the youngest person ever to do so—with a stunning doctoral dissertation on Virginia Woolf. Published in 1935, the paper was the first-ever feminist critique of Woolf’s work and inspired a series of correspondences between the two writers. It also led to Gruber’s eventual meeting with Woolf, which she recounted six decades later in Virginia Woolf: The Will to Create as a Woman. Described by Gruber as “the odyssey of how I met Virginia Woolf, and how her life and work became intertwined with my life,” Virginia Woolf is a clear and insightful portrait of one of modern literature’s most innovative authors, written by one of America’s most remarkable journalists.
    • The Search for an Abortionist by Nancy Howell Lee

      The Search for an Abortionist

      Nancy Howell Lee

      This eye-opening look at the abortion process prior to the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision of 1973 is now more relevant than ever, with a new introduction by the author revisiting history that is still salient half a century later

      In the years before Roe v. Wade, women seeking to end their unwanted pregnancies had limited options—many of them dangerous, even potentially fatal, and nearly all of them illegal. This groundbreaking work by sociologist Nancy Howell Lee, first published in 1969, takes an intimate look at the entire abortion process—from the initial decision to terminate a pregnancy through the procedure itself and the aftermath—providing an incomparable view of what is still one of the most controversial and divisive issues in America.

      Based on interviews with one hundred fourteen women who had illegal abortions, Howell Lee’s book reveals how the abortions were procured and paid for, and looks at the lasting effects the experience had on the participants. The interviewees were open and honest about what influenced their decisions, how they conducted their search for someone to perform the procedure, and the physical and emotional aftereffects. With many state governments across America currently passing new legislation that restricts and, in many cases, effectively bans abortion, an eventual return to the pre-Roe days threatens the well-being of millions of women, making Nancy Howell Lee’s pioneering study more relevant than ever. It is a must-read for all those interested in reproductive rights issues.
    • Why I Wore Lipstick to My Mastectomy by Geralyn Lucas

      Why I Wore Lipstick to My Mastectomy

      Geralyn Lucas

      Having recently graduated from Columbia Journalism School and landed her dream job at 20/20, the last thing twenty-seven-year-old Geralyn expects to hear is a breast cancer diagnosis. And there is one part of the diagnosis that no one will discuss with her: what it means to be a young woman with cancer in a beauty-obsessed culture. Trying to find herself while losing her vibrancy and her looks, Geralyn embarks on a road of self-acceptance that will inspire all women. Although her story is explicitly about a period of time when she was driven by fear and uncertainty, Geralyn managed a transformation that will encourage all women under siege to discover their own courage and beauty. The important and outrageous lessons of Why I Wore Lipstick come fast and furious with the same gusto that Geralyn has learned to bring to every aspect of her life.

    • Domestic Affairs by Joyce Maynard

      Domestic Affairs

      Joyce Maynard

      An unforgettable collection of essays on the everyday thrills and challenges of marriage and motherhood, from one of America’s best-loved memoirists
      Witty and insightful, Domestic Affairs is an extension of Joyce Maynard’s celebrated, widely syndicated newspaper column of the same name that ran from 1984 to 1990. Each essay gives an unfiltered look at the ups and downs of family life and a remarkable window into the challenges of modern motherhood. Topics range from babysitter woes to family visits to coping with a child’s burgeoning independence. These collected writings represent nine years’ worth of stories about the greatest adventure of Maynard’s life, or, as she writes, “the difficult, exhausting, humbling, and endlessly gratifying business of raising children, of ensuring the health of both body and soul.” This ebook features an illustrated biography of Joyce Maynard including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Free Woman by Marion Meade

      Free Woman

      Marion Meade

      Victoria Woodhull is a historical figure too often ignored and undervalued by historians. Although she never achieved political power, her actions and her presence on the political scene helped begin to change the way Americans thought about the right to vote, particularly women’s suffrage, and she set the stage for political emancipations to come throughout the twentieth century.

      Woodhull was a product of and a revolutionary within the socially conservative Victorian era, which predominated in the United States as much as it did in England. She was an anomaly within her time, an unlikely and unconventional woman. She came from a background of poverty and her careers prior to entering politics included fortune-telling, acting, being a stock broker, journalism, and lecturing on women’s rights. She ran for president of the United States in 1872. At that time, she had twice been divorced and she outraged even the feminists of her day by refusing to confine her campaign to the issue of women’s suffrage. She advocated a single sexual standard for men and women, legalization of prostitution, reform of the marriage and family institutions, and “free love.” She shocked a nation largely because her plain-speaking was designed to expose the endemic hypocrisy of “respectable” people in society.

      Marion Meade has created a vivid picture of the colorful figure that was Victoria Woodhull, but she also fully portrays the era in which she lived, in all of its truest and often most unflattering colors. She makes the 1870s read in many ways like the 1970s, not just because Victoria Woodhull was far ahead of her own time but also because many people in the present era are still culturally behind the times.

    •  by
      • Buy it from:
    • The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt by Philosophical Library

      The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt

      Philosophical Library

      Nearly five hundred sage observations from the “First Lady of the World”

      A role model for generations of women, Eleanor Roosevelt lent her passion, support, and life experience to humanitarian causes in the United States and abroad, making her a popular and influential figure of the twentieth century. Both as a first lady and as a public figure, Mrs. Roosevelt championed the poor, minorities, and women. Her work as a civil rights advocate resulted in the desegregation of the armed forces and the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Culling quotes from her books, letters, and articles, and also providing timelines, contextual explanations, and a reader’s guide, The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt offers a thorough and lasting tribute to a tireless and compassionate leader.
    • At Eighty-Two by May Sarton

      At Eighty-Two

      May Sarton

      May Sarton confronts the pleasures and compromises of old age in this deeply moving memoir completed a few months before she died

      In this poignant and fearless account, Sarton chronicles the struggles of life at eighty-two. She juxtaposes the quotidian details of life—battling a leaky roof, sharing an afternoon nap with her cat, the joy of buying a new mattress—with lyrical musings about work, celebrity, devoted friends, and the limitations wrought by the frailties of age. She creates poetry out of everyday existence, whether bemoaning a lack of recognition by the literary establishment or the devastation wrought by a series of strokes. Incapacitated by illness, Sarton relies on friends for the little things she always took for granted. As she becomes more and more aware of “what holds life together in a workable whole,” she takes solace in flowers and chocolate and reading letters from devoted fans. This journal takes us into the heart and mind of an extraordinary artist and woman, and is a must-read for Sarton devotees and anyone facing the reality of growing older.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays by Alix Kates Shulman

      A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays

      Alix Kates Shulman

      A provocative collection of essays by one of the foremost thinkers of second-wave feminism
      In a career spanning four decades, Alix Kates Shulman has written on issues ranging from marriage, sex, and divorce to religious identity, age, and family devotion. Throughout her diverse body of work runs a staunch advocacy of equal rights and social justice. Beginning with her provocative essay “A Marriage Agreement,” written in 1969, and continuing through to the heartrending “Caring for an Ill Spouse, and Other Caregivers,” written in 2011, this collection provides a window into the social movements that defined an era. Witty, stirring, and poignant, A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays illustrates how each generation, in Shulman’s words, “can do no more than add its bit to the endless river of consciousness and change.”

    • Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions by Gloria Steinem

      Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions

      Gloria Steinem

      This New York Times–bestselling feminist classic remains as fresh and relevant in our current climate as when it was first published.

      Covering two decades—from the early sixties to the early eighties—the pieces in Gloria Steinem’s diverse, stimulating, and often-prescient first collection dare to ask how our world might change for the better if we each behaved “as if everyone mattered.” Steinem’s experiences on the front lines of the women’s movement chart her own consciousness-raising and serve as a metaphor for the evolution of feminist politics and social change.

      An early assignment as a “girl reporter,” going undercover as a Bunny in the Playboy Club, becomes an eye-opening exposé of appalling work conditions and sexual harassment. In many of the pieces that follow, Steinem challenges the practices and preconceptions that marginalize, exclude, exploit, and victimize women.

      Steinem understands that the political is always personal, and vice versa, and so her writings range from the polemical—“Erotica vs. Pornography” and “The Politics of Food”—to the deeply personal—“Ruth’s Song,” a moving tribute to her mentally ill mother—to sharp satire—“If Men Could Menstruate.” One of the first to address topics such as female genital mutilation and transgenderism, Steinem has truly earned the right to be called a feminist pioneer, and this collection is both a testament to her legacy in the fight for equality and an entertaining, thought-provoking journey through the lives of modern women.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Gloria Steinem including rare images from the author’s personal collection.

    • You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down by Alice Walker

      You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down

      Alice Walker

      In Alice Walker’s second story collection, women stand their ground in the midst of crisis

      This collection builds on Alice Walker’s earlier work, the much-praised In Love & Trouble. But unlike her first collection of stories, the women in these tenderly wrought tales face their problems head on, proving powerful and self-possessed even when degraded by others—sometimes by those closest to them. But even as the female protagonists face exploitation, social asymmetries, and casual cruelties, Walker leavens her stories with ample wit and, as always, an eye for the redemptive power of love.

      A collection that reveals a master of fiction approaching the fullness of her talent, these are the stories Walker produced while penning The Color Purple.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • The Wives by Alexandra Popoff

      Muses and editors, saviors and publishers: Meet the women behind the greatest works of Russian literature
      “Behind every good man is a good woman” is a common saying, but when it comes to literature, the relationship between spouses is even that much more complex. F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence used their marriages for literary inspiration and material, sometime at the expense of their spouses’ sanity. Thomas Carlyle wanted his wife to assist him, but Jane Carlyle became increasingly bitter and resentful in her new role, putting additional strain on their relationship. In Russian literary marriages, however, the wives of some of the most famous authors of all time did not resent taking a “secondary position,” although to call their position secondary does not do justice to the vital role these women played in the creation of some of the greatest literary works in history. From Sophia Tolstoy to Véra Nabokov, Elena Bulgakov, Nadezdha Mandelstam, Anna Dostevsky, and Natalya Solzhenitsyn, these women ranged from stenographers and typists to editors, researchers, translators, and even publishers. Living under restrictive regimes, many of these women battled censorship and preserved the writers’ illicit archives, often risking their own lives to do so. They established a tradition all their own, unmatched in the West. Many of these women were the writers’ intellectual companions and made invaluable contributions to the creative process. And their husbands knew it. Leo Tolstoy made no secret of Sofia’s involvement in War and Peace in his letters, and Vladimir Nabokov referred to Véra as his own “single shadow.”

    • Queens Consort by Lisa Hilton

      Queens Consort

      Lisa Hilton

      Meet the subjects of history’s greatest dramas: the first queens of England
      Though their royal husbands occupy the lion’s share of history books, the queens of early England are fascinating subjects in their own right. Lisa Hilton’s Queens Consort vividly evokes the lives and times of England’s first queens, from Matilda of Flanders and the Norman conquest of England to Elizabeth of York and the beginning of the Tudor dynasty. By profiling twenty different queens, Hilton provides an intricate and dramatic composite of the English monarch: from the ruthless Isabella of France, who violently gained control of England by dispatching Edward II, to the beloved Matilda of Scotland, known for her intelligence and devotion despite her philandering husband, Henry I; and from a girl who was crowned at the age of nine to a commoner who climbed the social ladder at the most opportune moment. Queens Consort dispels many of the myths that have surrounded these women for centuries, while simultaneously illuminating lesser-known facts about their lives.
    • Monster by Robin Morgan

      Monster

      Robin Morgan

      The debut poetry collection from one of feminism’s most passionate voices, with a new preface by the author

      Well before Robin Morgan was known as a feminist leader, literary magazines published her as a serious poet, and in 1979 she received a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship in poetry. Monster, her first collection, originally published in 1972, contains work that will astonish, disorient, and move readers in powerful ways.

      But Monster is more than just a book; it has become a phenomenon. Written at a time of political turmoil during the birth of contemporary feminism, the title poem was adopted by women as the anthem of the women’s movement; it was chanted at demonstrations and some of its lines became slogans. “Arraignment” stirred an international controversy over Ted Hughes’s influence on Sylvia Plath’s suicide—complete with lawsuits, the banning of this book, and the publication of underground, pirated feminist editions, all of which Morgan reveals in her new preface.

      From her well-wrought poems in classical forms to the searing energy and poignant lyricism of the longer, later ones, Morgan’s work when it was first released spoke to women hungry for validation of their own reality—and the book sold thirty thousand copies in hardcover alone in its first six months, which was unheard of for poetry.

      Available now for the first time in years, Monster is an intense, propulsive journey deep into the heart of one of feminism’s greatest heroes.

    • The Mer-Child by Robin Morgan

      The Mer-Child

      Robin Morgan

      Love transcends all barriers in this modern fairy tale

      When the Mer-Child learned the story of the Little Mermaid, he recognized it as the account of his mother and father, the beautiful mermaid and the human man for whom she sacrificed everything. But that love had left their offspring, the Mer-Child, stranded between worlds, as unwelcome in the realm of the sea as in the earth above. Never fitting in, he has been left to wander, searching for friends, his silvery tail fluttering mournfully in the waves.

      One day he notices a little girl sitting on the beach. Her father must carry her to and from the shore each day because her legs are paralyzed. Her father is black, her mother white, and she is as much an outcast in both communities as the Mer-Child is in his own. Slowly, warily, they find kinship, both in their differences and in their similarities, and they form a bond that changes them forever. What each learns about the value of being different makes this modern-day fairy tale a new classic, with two memorable characters and an enduring message.

    • Raw Silk by Janet Burroway

      Raw Silk

      Janet Burroway

      Janet Burroway’s critically acclaimed novel, which the New Yorker hailed as “enormously enjoyable” and Newsweek called “a novel of rare and lustrous quality,” is the story of a woman whose unraveling marriage sends her on a personal odyssey halfway around the world to Japan
      Virginia Marbalestier has come a long way from the California trailer park where she grew up. Now a designer at the textile firm where her husband is the number-two executive, as the mother of a young daughter and the mistress of an English Tudor manor, she has it all. But her husband, Oliver, is becoming increasingly elitist and controlling, resentful of her friendships, and rough in bed. The arrival of a new employee, a distressed young woman in whom Virginia finds the missing threads of her own identity, and the firm’s possible merger with a Japanese competitor heighten the tensions between Virginia and Oliver, and impel Virginia to set off on a foreign adventure that will change her life forever.

    • Clay's Ark by Octavia E. Butler

      Clay's Ark

      Octavia E. Butler

      In a “haunting, apocalyptic, compelling” near future, one man and his daughters must stop an alien virus from becoming a deadly global epidemic (Essence).
      Blake Maslin and his two daughters are driving to Flagstaff when bandits swarm their car. At gunpoint, the marauders kidnap one of Blake’s children, promising to keep her safe in return for medical care. Warily, the doctor goes with them, not realizing that he has just taken the first step down a terrifying path that will consume his life. The gunmen take him deep into the desert, to a colony of people infected with a gruesome alien disease. It causes weakness, sallow skin, and birth defects so horrible that the children who suffer them cannot rightly be called human. The victims have quarantined themselves in the desert lest their illness spread and doom mankind. But as their willingness to accept isolation falters, Blake becomes the last hope for the survival of an uncontaminated Earth.

      Octavia E. Butler’s groundbreaking and award-winning science fiction and dystopian novels have inspired generations of readers all over the world. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler

      Parable of the Sower

      Octavia E. Butler

      The Nebula Award–winning author of Kindred presents a “gripping” dystopian novel about a woman fleeing Los Angeles as America spirals into chaos (The New York Times Book Review).

      Lauren Olamina and her family live in one of the only safe neighborhoods remaining on the outskirts of Los Angeles. Behind the walls of their defended enclave, Lauren’s father, a preacher, and a handful of other citizens try to salvage what remains of a culture that has been destroyed by drugs, war, and chronic shortages of water, gasoline, and more. While her father tries to lead people on the righteous path, Lauren struggles with hyperempathy, a condition that makes her extraordinarily sensitive to the pain of others.

      When fire destroys their compound, Lauren’s family is killed and she is forced out into a world that is facing apocalypse. With a handful of other refugees, Lauren must make her way north to safety, along the way conceiving a revolutionary idea that may mean salvation for all mankind.

      From a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship who has won multiple Nebula and Hugo Awards, this iconic novel is “a gripping tale of survival and a poignant account of growing up sane in a disintegrating world” (The New York Times Book Review).

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Parable of the Talents by Octavia E. Butler

      Parable of the Talents

      Octavia E. Butler

      Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel: The powerful and compelling sequel to the dystopian classic Parable of the Sower

      Lauren Olamina was only eighteen when her family was killed, and anarchy encroached on her Southern California home. She fled the war zone for the hope of quiet and safety in the north. There she founded Acorn, a peaceful community based on a religion of her creation, called Earthseed, whose central tenet is that God is change. Five years later, Lauren has married a doctor and given birth to a daughter. Acorn is beginning to thrive. But outside the tranquil group’s walls, America is changing for the worse.

      Presidential candidate Andrew Steele Jarret wins national fame by preaching a return to the values of the American golden age. To his marauding followers, who are identified by their crosses and black robes, this is a call to arms to end religious tolerance and racial equality—a brutal doctrine they enforce by machine gun. And as this band of violent extremists sets its deadly sights on Earthseed, Acorn is plunged into a harrowing fight for its very survival.

      Taking its place alongside Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Butler’s eerily prophetic novel offers a terrifying vision of our potential future, but also one of hope.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Wild Seed by Octavia E. Butler
      As the acclaimed Patternist science fiction series begins, two immortals meet in the long-ago past—and mankind’s destiny is changed forever.
      For a thousand years, Doro has cultivated a small African village, carefully breeding its people in search of seemingly unattainable perfection. He survives through the centuries by stealing the bodies of others, a technique he has so thoroughly mastered that nothing on Earth can kill him. But when a gang of New World slavers destroys his village, ruining his grand experiment, Doro is forced to go west and begin anew. He meets Anyanwu, a centuries-old woman whose means of immortality are as kind as his are cruel. She is a shapeshifter, capable of healing with a kiss, and she recognizes Doro as a tyrant. Though many humans have tried to kill them, these two demi-gods have never before met a rival. Now they begin a struggle that will last centuries and permanently alter the nature of humanity.

      Hugo and Nebula award–winning author Octavia E. Butler’s sweeping cross-century epic places her “among the best of contemporary SF writers” (Houston Chronicle). This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Mind of My Mind by Octavia E. Butler

      Mind of My Mind

      Octavia E. Butler

      From “one of science fiction’s finest writers”: A young woman with tremendous psychic power battles to set a new course for mankind (The New York Times).
      The baby’s name is Mary, and her father is immortal. For thousands of years he has orchestrated a selective breeding project, attempting to create a master race capable of controlling others through thought. Most of his attempts have resulted in volatile mutations, but Mary—whom he has raised in the rough part of a Southern California town—is the closest he has come to perfection. If he doesn’t handle her carefully, this greatest experiment will be his last. As Mary comes of age, she begins to grow aware of her psychic powers. And when she learns of her father’s plans for her, she refuses to acquiesce. She challenges him to a psychic war, battling to free her people and set a new course for mankind.

      Multiple Nebula and Hugo award–winning author Octavia Butler’s epic and thought-provoking Patternist series has fascinated generations of readers, exploring the effects of power and what it means to be human. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Patternmaster by Octavia E. Butler

      Patternmaster

      Octavia E. Butler

      A tyrant’s heirs battle to control the minds of every human on Earth in this thrilling finale of the Nebula Award–winning author’s epic Patternist saga.
      A psychic net hangs across the world, and only the Patternists can control it. They use their telepathic powers to enslave lesser life forms, to do battle with the diseased, half-human creatures who rage outside their walls, and, sometimes, to fight amongst themselves. Ruling them all is the Patternmaster, a man of such psychic strength that he can influence the thoughts of all those around him. But he cannot stop death, and when he is gone, chaos will reign. The Patternmaster has hundreds of children, but only one of them—Coransee—has ambition to match his father’s. To seize the throne he will have to coopt or kill every one of his siblings, and he will not shy from the task. But when one brother takes refuge among the savages, a battle ensues that will change the destiny of every being on the planet.

      Octavia E. Butler’s first published novel, Patternmaster launched the legendary career of a visionary, award-winning writer. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Bloodchild by Octavia E. Butler

      Bloodchild

      Octavia E. Butler

      Six extraordinary stories from the author of Kindred, a master of modern science fiction—including a Hugo and Nebula award–winning novella.

      Octavia E. Butler’s classic “Bloodchild,” winner of both the Nebula and Hugo awards, anchors this collection of incomparable stories and essays. “Bloodchild” is set on a distant planet where human children spend their lives preparing to become hosts for the offspring of the alien Tlic. Sometimes the procedure is harmless, but often it is not. Also included is the Hugo Award–winning “Speech Sounds,” about a near future in which humans must adapt after an apocalyptic event robs them of their ability to speak. “The Evening and the Morning and the Night,” another esteemed title in this collection, is a Nebula Award finalist. In these pages, Butler shows us life on Earth and amongst the stars, telling her tales with characteristic imagination and clarity. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Dawn by Octavia E. Butler
      An alien race calls on one woman to revive mankind after Earth’s apocalypse in this science fiction classic from the award-winning author of Parable of the Sower.
      Lilith Iyapo has just lost her husband and son when atomic fire consumes Earth—the last stage of the planet’s final war. Hundreds of years later Lilith awakes, deep in the hold of a massive alien spacecraft piloted by the Oankali—who arrived just in time to save humanity from extinction. They have kept Lilith and other survivors asleep for centuries, as they learned whatever they could about Earth. Now it is time for Lilith to lead them back to her home world, but life among the Oankali on the newly resettled planet will be nothing like it was before. The Oankali survive by genetically merging with primitive civilizations—whether their new hosts like it or not. For the first time since the nuclear holocaust, Earth will be inhabited. Grass will grow, animals will run, and people will learn to survive the planet’s untamed wilderness. But their children will not be human. Not exactly.

      Featuring strong and compelling characters and exploring complex themes of gender and species, Octavia E. Butler presents a powerful, postapocalyptic interplanetary epic, as well as a ray of hope for humanity. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Adulthood Rites by Octavia E. Butler

      Adulthood Rites

      Octavia E. Butler

      The futures of both mankind and an alien species rest in the hands of one hybrid son in the award-winning science fiction author’s masterful sequel to Dawn.

      Nuclear war had nearly destroyed mankind when the Oankali came to the rescue, saving humanity—but at a price. The Oankali survive by mixing their DNA with that of other species, and now on Earth they have permitted no child to be born without an Oankali parent. The first true hybrid is a boy named Akin—son of Lilith Iyapo— and to the naked eye he looks human, for now. He is born with extraordinary sensory powers, understanding speech at birth, speaking in sentences at two months old, and soon developing the ability to see at the molecular level. More powerful than any human or Oankali, he will be the architect of both races’ intergalactic future. But before he can carry this new species into the stars, Akin must decide which unlucky souls will stay behind.

      At once a coming-of-age story, science fiction adventure, and philosophical exploration, Butler’s ambitious and breathtaking novel ultimately raises the question of what it means to be human. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Imago by Octavia E. Butler

      The stunning conclusion to a postapocalyptic trilogy about an alien species merging with humans—from “one of science fiction’s finest writers” (TheNew York Times).

      Human and Oankali have been mating since the aliens first came to Earth to rescue the few survivors of an annihilating nuclear war. The Oankali began a massive breeding project, guided by the ooloi, a sexless subspecies capable of manipulating DNA, in the hope of eventually creating a perfect starfaring race. Jodahs is supposed to be just another hybrid of human and Oankali, but as he begins his transformation to adulthood he finds himself becoming ooloi—the first ever born to a human mother. As his body changes, Jodahs develops the ability to shapeshift, manipulate matter, and cure or create disease at will. If this frightened young man is able to master his new identity, Jodahs could prove the savior of what’s left of mankind. Or, if he is not careful, he could become a plague that will destroy this new race once and for all.

      Readers of Ursula K. Le Guin and N. K. Jemisin will be fascinated by bestselling author Octavia Butler’s thought-provoking and compelling vision of humanity.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.

    • Lilith's Brood by Octavia E. Butler

      Lilith's Brood

      Octavia E. Butler

      Three novels in one volume: the acclaimed science fiction trilogy about an alien species that could save humanity after nuclear apocalypse—or destroy it.

      The newest stage in human evolution begins in outer space. Survivors of a cataclysmic nuclear war awake to find themselves being studied by the Oankali, tentacle-covered galactic travelers whose benevolent appearance hides their surprising plan for the future of mankind. The Oankali arrive not just to save humanity, but to bond with it—crossbreeding to form a hybrid species that can survive in the place of its human forebears, who were so intent on self-destruction. Some people resist, forming pocket communities of purebred rebellion, but many realize they have no choice. The human species inevitably expands into something stranger, stronger, and undeniably alien. From Hugo and Nebula award–winning author Octavia Butler, Lilith’s Brood is both a thrilling, epic adventure of man’s struggle to survive after Earth’s destruction, and a provocative meditation on what it means to be human.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Seed to Harvest by Octavia E. Butler

      Seed to Harvest

      Octavia E. Butler

      The complete Patternist series—the acclaimed science fiction epic of a world transformed by a secret race of telepaths and their devastating rise to power.
      In the late seventeenth century, two immortals meet in an African forest. Anyanwu is a healer, a three-hundred-year-old woman who uses her wisdom to help those around her. The other is Doro, a malevolent despot who has mastered the power of stealing the bodies of others when his wears out. Together they will change the world. Over the next three centuries, Doro mounts a colossal selective breeding project, attempting to create a master race of telepaths. He succeeds beyond his wildest dreams, splitting the human race down the middle and establishing a new world order dominated by the most manipulative minds on Earth. In these four novels, award-winning author Octavia E. Butler tells the classic story that began her legendary career: a mythic tale of the transformation of civilization. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Unexpected Stories by Octavia E. Butler

      Unexpected Stories

      Octavia E. Butler

      An NPR Books Great Read: Two never-before-published stories from the archives of one of science fiction’s all-time masters.

      The novella “A Necessary Being” showcases Octavia E. Butler’s ability to create alien yet fully believable “others.” Tahneh’s father was a Hao, one of a dwindling race whose leadership abilities render them so valuable that their members are captured and forced to govern. When her father dies, Tahneh steps into his place, both chief and prisoner, and for twenty years has ruled without ever meeting another of her kind. She bears her loneliness privately until the day that a Hao youth is spotted wandering into her territory. As her warriors sharpen their weapons, Tahneh must choose between imprisoning the newcomer—and living the rest of her life alone.

      The second story in this volume, “Childfinder,” was commissioned by Harlan Ellison for his legendary (and never-published) anthology The Last Dangerous Visions™. A disaffected telepath connects with a young girl in a desperate attempt to help her harness her growing powers. But in the richly evocative fiction of Octavia E. Butler, mentorship is a rocky path, and every lesson comes at a price.

      The award-winning author of science fiction classics Parable of the Sower and Kindred bestows these compelling, long lost gems “like the miraculous discovery that the beloved book you’ve read a dozen times has an extra chapter” (Los Angeles Review of Books).
      Harlan Ellison and Dangerous Visions are registered trademarks of the Kilimanjaro Corporation. All rights reserved.
    • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

      Madame Bovary

      Gustave Flaubert

      One of the world’s most celebrated novels, soon to be a major motion picture starring Mia Wasikowska

      This indelible portrait of a beautiful woman’s aching lust for more—more romance, more glamour, more fun—and her resulting tragic demise, is widely considered one of the finest novels ever written. Flaubert’s refusal to condemn his adulterous heroine, a woman trapped as much by circumstance as by her own boundless desires, scandalized nineteenth-century France and resulted in a trial on charges of obscenity. But it is the beauty of the novel’s prose, the great care it takes with characters major and minor, and the relentless but elegant thrust of its narrative, that puts Madame Bovary in a class by itself.

      In the story of a provincial doctor and his wife’s tawdry affairs, Gustave Flaubert found the stuff of great literature. A perfect novel about imperfect people, Madame Bovary is the rare classic that exceeds expectations and feels as fresh now as it did the day it was written.

      This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
    • A Better Place by Barbara Hall

      A Better Place

      Barbara Hall

      A Southern novel in the tradition of Anne Tyler and Anne Rivers Siddons, A Better Place marks the adult fiction debut of one of television’s most successful and creative writers

      In an attempt to discover why her life hasn’t worked out the way she had hoped it would, Valerie Caldwell returns to the Southern town she left twelve years earlier to visit her old haunts and two friends from her school days, Tess and Mary Grace—much to their alarm and chagrin.

    • Charisma by Barbara Hall

      Charisma

      Barbara Hall

      In the aftermath of a violent incident and near-death experience, Sarah Lange is plagued by heavenly voices and dogged by a desire to return “home.” Frightened by her desire to terminate her existence on earth, she checks into a trauma center in Malibu, California, and meets Dr. David Sutton, an intellectual, scientist, reductionist, and someone who believes in nothing beyond his immediate experience. David’s world is as divorced from mystery and magic as Sarah’s is alive with and animated by it. Their sessions open up a dialogue about the separation of worlds—one easily defined and explained and one unknowable and waiting on the other side of human experience. Even as his faith in his profession fades, David struggles to bring his disturbed patient back to the real world. In a desperate effort to define herself, Sarah “escapes,” and David must decide how far he is willing to go to save a patient, and ultimately, himself.

    • Sappho's Leap by Erica Jong

      Sappho's Leap

      Erica Jong

      The #1 New York Times–bestselling author of Fear of Flying brings the seductive Greek poet to life in this “enormously entertaining” tale (Booklist).
      As she stands poised at the edge of a precipice in the shadow of the sanctuary of Apollo, the greatest love poet who ever was or ever will be recalls the eventful fifty years that have led her to this moment. It was love that seduced her, at age sixteen, into an ill-fated plot with the poet Alcaeus to depose the despot of the island of Lesbos. It was love that made her trade the unwanted marriage bed of an old, despised, and drunken husband for a seemingly endless series of lovers, both male and female.
      For Sappho, life has always been a banquet to be savored to the fullest, a strange and sensual odyssey that has carried her to the far corners of the ancient world. Devoted to the goddess Aphrodite and granted the gift of immortal song, she has followed her magnificent destiny from Delphi to Egypt, to the land of the Amazons, the realm of the centaurs, and into the stygian depths of Hades itself, often in the company of her companion and friend, the fabulist slave Aesop.
      Through every grand affair and every wild adventure, she has remained forever true to her heart, her passion, and herself, right up to this, the end of everything.
      Combining evocative and realistic detail with unabashedly outrageous invention, Erica Jong’s Sappho’s Leap is a flawless gem of historical fiction boldly imagined by one of America’s most enthralling storytellers.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erica Jong including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

    • Becoming Light by Erica Jong

      Becoming Light

      Erica Jong

      A courageous and enthralling collection of poems by Fear of Flying author Erica Jong celebrating life, art, sex, and womanhood
      seven lives,then webecome light . . .
      Erica Jong’s novels are fearless and passionate. So, too, is her poetry. Though renowned—and sometimes vilified—for her unabashedly sensual fiction, the author considers herself a poet first and foremost. “It was my poetry,” Jong writes, “that kept me sane, that kept me whole, that kept me alive.”
      Becoming Light contains poems personally selected by Jong from her complete oeuvre of acclaimed published works—poems of love, sex, witches, gods, and demons; word-songs brimming with wit, heart, bitterness, sorrow, and truth. From the earliest poetic musings of a brilliant young artist first trying out her wings to later works born of experience and maturity, unpublished before appearing in this collection, Jong’s pure artistry shines like a beacon as she writes, fearlessly and passionately, about being a woman, about being alive.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erica Jong including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

    • Fear of Flying by Erica Jong

      Fear of Flying

      Erica Jong

      The blockbuster novel of female freedom and empowerment that launched a sexual revolution
      After five years, Isadora Wing has come to a crossroads in her marriage: Should she and her husband stay together or get divorced? Accompanying her husband to an analysts’ conference in Vienna, she ditches him and strikes out on her own, crisscrossing Europe in search of a man who can inspire uninhibited passion. But, as she comes to learn, liberation and happiness are not necessarily the same thing. A literary sensation when first published in 1973, Fear of Flying established Erica Jong as one of her generation’s foremost voices on sex and feminism. Nearly four decades later, the novel has lost none of its insight, verve, or jaw-dropping wit. This ebook features a new introduction by Fay Weldon, as well as an illustrated biography of Erica Jong, including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

    • Fanny by Erica Jong
      A “rollicking and bawdy” tale of eighteenth-century England, inspired by Fanny Hill, from the New York Times–bestselling author of Fear of Flying (The Plain Dealer).

      Galloping from England to Africa to the high seas of the Caribbean, bestselling author Erica Jong’s “perverse epic” follows the amorous adventures of a woman of pleasure and pluck (The New York Times). Falling in with randy highwaymen, witches, kidnappers, pirate queens, prostitutes, and such luminaries as Jonathan Swift, William Hogarth, and Alexander Pope, Fanny is seeking much more than fortune. In this unexpurgated “memoir” by the girl made famous in John Cleland’s notorious Fanny Hill, our dauntless heroine finally reveals what really made her.

      Life begins somewhat ignobly for Fanny Hackabout-Jones. Abandoned as an infant on the doorstep of Lord and Lady Bellars’s grand Wiltshire manor, she contemplates the literary life as she grows to ripe young womanhood. Fanny chooses, however, to pursue a very different future when she flees to London to escape the mortifying advances of her adoptive father. There, on the road, her life truly begins. Cast by pernicious Fate—and her own audacious will—into a series of astonishing escapades, Fanny learns that a woman’s lot is not an easy one in these oppressive times. But she will not be discouraged, nor will she falter, on the uneven path toward notoriety, self-discovery, motherhood, and love. This is a delightful twist on classic literature—and “Erica Jong was the right person to write it” (Anthony Burgess, Saturday Review).
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Erica Jong including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
    • Collected Poems by May Sarton

      Collected Poems

      May Sarton

      A comprehensive volume collecting May Sarton’s poetry from over sixty years of work
      This collection spanning six decades exposes the charm and clarity of Sarton’s poetry to the fullest. Arranged in chronological order, it follows the transformation of her writing through a wide range of poetic forms and styles. Her poetry meditates on topics including the American landscape, aging, nature, the act of creating art, and self-study. This compendium from one of America’s most beloved poets will enthrall readers.

    • Memoirs of an Ex–Prom Queen by Alix Kates Shulman

      Memoirs of an Ex–Prom Queen

      Alix Kates Shulman

      “This story, told with astringent wit, explores every facet and cliché of what it means to grow up female and beautiful.” —San Francisco Chronicle
      Sasha Davis, smart and pretty, was once an all-American teenage beauty queen. Full of potential, she was the only student at her midwestern high school to attend college on the East Coast. But soon her promise begins to falter. After starting graduate school in New York, Sasha gets married and drops out of school to take a clerical job. Consigned to the role of trophy wife, and already feeling old at twenty-four, she lives in fear of turning thirty—the year, in her mind, when her beauty will fade and life as she knows it will end. While she still has time, she embarks on an adventure of self-discovery and sexual exploration. Only after entering a second marriage and finding herself trapped by her responsibilities as a mother, does she finally begin to figure out what’s gone wrong. Poignant, funny, and breathtakingly honest, Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is a landmark in second-wave feminism and a must-read for anyone interested in what it really means to be a woman in America.

    • You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down by Alice Walker

      You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down

      Alice Walker

      In Alice Walker’s second story collection, women stand their ground in the midst of crisis

      This collection builds on Alice Walker’s earlier work, the much-praised In Love & Trouble. But unlike her first collection of stories, the women in these tenderly wrought tales face their problems head on, proving powerful and self-possessed even when degraded by others—sometimes by those closest to them. But even as the female protagonists face exploitation, social asymmetries, and casual cruelties, Walker leavens her stories with ample wit and, as always, an eye for the redemptive power of love.

      A collection that reveals a master of fiction approaching the fullness of her talent, these are the stories Walker produced while penning The Color Purple.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Going Too Far by Robin Morgan

      Going Too Far

      Robin Morgan

      The personal papers of one of feminism’s most passionate leaders, with a new preface by the author

      As an activist for social justice, Robin Morgan has acquired a reputation for strong convictions and a life-affirming way of expressing them through writing. Nowhere is this more evident than in Going Too Far, which takes us behind the scenes in Morgan’s life and in the women’s movement until 1977. We watch the development of an organizer who is a complex thinker while Morgan evolves as a mother, leader, writer, and activist.

      Morgan’s keen eye is trained on all aspects of modern feminism, and this is reflected in the juxtaposition of the journal entries and letters of her personal life with the essays and polemics that shape her public persona. Her opinions on marriage, love, religion, pornography, and art are as utterly fresh and timely today as they were decades ago. Her growing wisdom and depth of perception are apparent in the book’s progression, and her last chapters, focused on what she terms the “metaphysics of feminism,” will change a reader’s world view for the better—and forever.

    • Saturday's Child by Robin Morgan

      Saturday's Child

      Robin Morgan

      An amazing trajectory: From child star to prize-winning writer to feminist icon

      Robin Morgan is famous as a bestselling author of nonfiction, a prize-winning poet, and a founder and leader of contemporary feminism. Before all of that, though, she was a working child actor. From the age of two, “Saturday’s child had to work for a living.” She had her own radio show on New York’s WOR, Little Robin Morgan, by the time she was four; starred during the Golden Age of television in TV’s Mama from ages seven to fourteen; and was named the Ideal American Girl when she was twelve. In Saturday’s Child, she writes for the first time about her working youth, her battles to break away from show business and from her mother, her search for her absent, abandoning father, her entrance into the literary world, and the development of her politics, relationships, and writing.

      Morgan describes her tumultuous but successful life with startling honesty: her flight from child stardom into literature, her twenty-year marriage to a bisexual man, her joyful motherhood, her lovers, both male and female, her actions as a “temporary terrorist” on the left during the 1970s, and her travels and experiences in the global women’s movement. She writes about compiling and editing the famous anthologies Sisterhood Is Powerful and Sisterhood Is Global and later cofounding with Simone de Beauvoir the Sisterhood Is Global Institute. Saturday’s Child follows this “Ideal American Girl” on her path to becoming the feminist icon she is today.

      Epic in scope, witty, and bravely insightful, this is the tale of half of humanity rising up and demanding its rights, told through the intensely personal story of one remarkable woman.

    • My Several Worlds by Pearl S. Buck

      My Several Worlds

      Pearl S. Buck

      The extraordinary and eventful personal account of the life of Pearl S. Buck, the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature
      Often regarded as one of Pearl S. Buck’s most significant works, My Several Worlds is the memoir of a major novelist and one of the key American chroniclers of China. Buck, who was born to missionary parents in 1892, spent much of the first portion of her life in China, experiencing the Boxer Rebellion first hand and becoming involved with the society with an intimacy available to few outside observers. The book is not only an important reflection on that nation’s modern history, but also an account of her re-engagement with America and the intense activity that characterized her life there, from her prolific novel-writing to her loves and friendships to her work for abandoned children and other humanitarian causes. As alive with incident as it is illuminating in its philosophy, My Several Worlds is essential reading for travelers and readers alike. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • A Bridge for Passing by Pearl S. Buck

      A Bridge for Passing

      Pearl S. Buck

      Pearl S. Buck’s absorbing and candid chronicle of her experience making a movie in 1960s Japan, while surviving the loss of her beloved husband
      Pearl S. Buck’s children’s story, The Big Wave, about two young friends whose lives are transformed when a volcano erupts and a tidal wave engulfs their village, was eventually optioned as a movie. A Bridge for Passing narrates the resulting adventure, the story of the people involved in the movie-making process (including Polish director Tad Danielewski), their many complications while shooting, and the experience of working in Japan at a time when memories of the war remained strong. As much as all this, the book is a poignant reflection on personal crisis, and relates Buck’s grief over the death of her husband of twenty-five years, Richard Walsh, who was also her editor. A Bridge for Passing offers an intimate view of postwar Japan mixed with Buck’s heartrending meditation on loss and love. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Inside of Time by Ruth Gruber

      Inside of Time

      Ruth Gruber

      The unforgettable story of Ruth Gruber’s rugged travels through Alaska and years spent helping refugees escape to Israel in the nation’s turbulent early days.

      Drawing from hundreds of notebooks accumulated throughout her career, Gruber’s breathtaking memoir spans some of the most significant events of the twentieth century, covering the years 1941 to 1952. She details her eighteen months spent surveying Alaska on behalf of the United States government, her role assisting Holocaust refugees’ emigration from war-torn Europe, and her relationships with some of the most important figures of the era, including Eleanor Roosevelt and Golda Meir.
      Gruber describes these eleven years of her inspiring life with clarity and insight, providing an extraordinary inside look at some of the twentieth century’s turning points.
    • Ahead of Time by Ruth Gruber

      Ahead of Time

      Ruth Gruber

      The early life and trailblazing career of one of the twentieth century’s most remarkable female journalists
      In this fascinating memoir, Ruth Gruber recalls her first twenty-five years, from her youth in Brooklyn to her astonishing academic accomplishments and groundbreaking journalistic career. She shares her experiences entering New York University at fifteen and just five years later becoming the world’s youngest person to earn a PhD. She recounts her time in Cologne, Germany, studying during Hitler’s rise to power, and her adventures in Europe and the Arctic as a reporter for the New York Herald Tribune.
      Spirited and compelling, Ahead of Time is a striking account of the early years of a woman at the center of the twentieth century’s turning points.
    • Once Upon a Pedestal by Emily Hahn

      Once Upon a Pedestal

      Emily Hahn

      A revolutionary woman for her time and an enormously creative writer, Emily Hahn broke all of the rules of the nineteen-twenties including traveling the country dressed as a boy, working for the Red Cross in Belgium, being the concubine to a Shanghai poet, using opium, and having an illegitimate child. Hahn kept on fighting against the stereotype of female docility that characterized the Victorian Era and was an advocate for the environment until her death at age ninety-two. Emily Hahn is the author of CHINA TO ME, a literary exploration of her trip to China.

    • The Story of My Life by Helen Keller

      The Story of My Life

      Helen Keller

      A classic of American autobiography—the remarkable story of Helen Keller’s early life and education

      At nineteen months old, Helen Keller was stricken with a mysterious illness that left her deaf and blind. For the next five years, she was trapped in the silent dark, her only means of communication a few dozen rudimentary signs. Her inability to express herself was a great source of frustration, and as she grew older, Helen became prone to angry outbursts and fits of despair. Her family sought help, and in March of 1887, twenty-year-old Anne Sullivan arrived from the Perkins Institution for the Blind. One month later, teacher and student made the first of many incredible breakthroughs. By placing one of Helen’s hands under cool running water and tracing the letters w-a-t-e-r on her other hand, Anne was able to convey the great mystery of language: that every object has a name. As Helen would later write in The Story of My Life, “That living word awakened my soul.”

      Covering the first twenty-two years of Helen Keller’s life, from that miraculous moment at the water pump to her acceptance into Radcliffe College, The Story of My Life is one of the most beloved and inspiring autobiographies ever written. The basis for The Miracle Worker, the Tony Award–winning play and Academy Award–winning film, its heartening message has touched millions of lives and torn down countless barriers the world over.

      This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

    • West with the Night by Beryl Markham

      West with the Night

      Beryl Markham

      The classic memoir of Africa, aviation, and adventure—the inspiration for Paula McLain’s Circling the Sun and “a bloody wonderful book” (Ernest Hemingway).

      Beryl Markham’s life story is a true epic. Not only did she set records and break barriers as a pilot, she shattered societal expectations, threw herself into torrid love affairs, survived desperate crash landings—and chronicled everything. A contemporary of Karen Blixen (better known as Isak Dinesen, the author of Out of Africa), Markham left an enduring memoir that soars with astounding candor and shimmering insights.

      A rebel from a young age, the British-born Markham was raised in Kenya’s unforgiving farmlands. She trained as a bush pilot at a time when most Africans had never seen a plane. In 1936, she accepted the ultimate challenge: to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west, a feat that fellow female aviator Amelia Earhart had completed in reverse just a few years before. Markham’s successes and her failures—and her deep, lifelong love of the “soul of Africa”—are all told here with wrenching honesty and agile wit.

      Hailed as “one of the greatest adventure books of all time” by Newsweek and “the sort of book that makes you think human beings can do anything” by the New York Times, West with the Night remains a powerful testament to one of the iconic lives of the twentieth century.
    • Looking Back by Joyce Maynard

      Looking Back

      Joyce Maynard

      A special anniversary edition of Joyce Maynard’s groundbreaking memoir about coming of age in one of America’s most defining decades
      Joyce Maynard was eighteen years old when her 1972 New York Times Magazine cover story catapulted her to national prominence. Published one year later, Looking Back is her remarkable follow-up—part memoir, part cultural history, and part social critique. She wrote about diving under her desk for air-raid practice during the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Beatles’ first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, and catching the first glimpse (on the cover of Life magazine) of a human fetus in utero. Extraordinarily frank, sincere, and opinionated, Maynard seemed unafraid to take on any subject—including herself. But as she reveals in a poignant and candid new foreword, she carefully kept her inner life off the page. She didn’t write about her difficult relationship with her mother, or her father’s alcoholism, or the fact that her best friend at college had struggled with the knowledge that he was gay. And she did not mention the most important part of her life at the time she was writing this book: her relationship with reclusive author J. D. Salinger, who read and corrected every page, even as he condemned her for writing it. In this special anniversary edition, Maynard’s candid introductory reflections on the girl behind the girl who wrote Looking Back lend a new dimension to this iconic analysis of a generation. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Joyce Maynard including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Intellectual Memoirs by Mary McCarthy

      Intellectual Memoirs

      Mary McCarthy

      In this no-holds-barred memoir with a foreword by Elizabeth Hardwick, the bestselling author of The Group recalls her early life in New York, revealing the genesis of and genius behind her groundbreaking fiction
      Mary McCarthy is a married twenty-four-year-old Communist and critic when this memoir begins. She’s disciplined, dedicated, and sexually experimental: At one point she realizes that in twenty-four hours she “had slept with three different men.” But she believes in the institution of marriage. Over the course of three years, she will have had two husbands, the second being the esteemed, much older critic Edmund Wilson. It is Wilson who becomes McCarthy’s mentor and muse, urging her to try her hand at fiction.
      McCarthy’s powers of observation are on witty display here, as the seventy-something writer recalls events that took place half a century earlier. Her eye for the revealing detail will be recognized by readers of her novels as she describes marching in May Day parades, attending parties for the Scottsboro Boys, and witnessing firsthand the American left wing’s response to the Moscow trials and the Spanish Civil War.
      Picking up where How I Grew left off and unfinished at the time of her death in 1989, Intellectual Memoirs is a vivid snapshot of a distinctive place and time—New York in the late 1930s—and the forces that shaped Mary McCarthy’s life as a woman and a writer.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author’s estate.

    • At Eighty-Two by May Sarton

      At Eighty-Two

      May Sarton

      May Sarton confronts the pleasures and compromises of old age in this deeply moving memoir completed a few months before she died

      In this poignant and fearless account, Sarton chronicles the struggles of life at eighty-two. She juxtaposes the quotidian details of life—battling a leaky roof, sharing an afternoon nap with her cat, the joy of buying a new mattress—with lyrical musings about work, celebrity, devoted friends, and the limitations wrought by the frailties of age. She creates poetry out of everyday existence, whether bemoaning a lack of recognition by the literary establishment or the devastation wrought by a series of strokes. Incapacitated by illness, Sarton relies on friends for the little things she always took for granted. As she becomes more and more aware of “what holds life together in a workable whole,” she takes solace in flowers and chocolate and reading letters from devoted fans. This journal takes us into the heart and mind of an extraordinary artist and woman, and is a must-read for Sarton devotees and anyone facing the reality of growing older.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • Journal of a Solitude by May Sarton

      Journal of a Solitude

      May Sarton

      May Sarton’s bestselling memoir of a solitary year spent at the house she bought and renovated

      “Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is richness of self.” —May Sarton

      May Sarton’s parrot chatters away as Sarton looks out the window at the rain and contemplates returning to her “real” life—not friends, not even love, but writing. In her bravest and most revealing memoir, Sarton casts her keenly observant eye on both the interior and exterior worlds. She shares insights about everyday life in the quiet New Hampshire village of Nelson, the desire for friends, and need for solitude—both an exhilarating and terrifying state. She likens writing to “cracking open the inner world again,” which sometimes plunges her into depression. She confesses her fears, her disappointments, her unresolved angers. Sarton’s garden is her great, abiding joy, sustaining her through seasons of psychic and emotional pain.

      Journal of a Solitude is a moving and profound meditation on creativity, oneness with nature, and the courage it takes to be alone. Both uplifting and cathartic, it sweeps us along on Sarton’s pilgrimage inward.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • A Good Enough Daughter by Alix Kates Shulman

      A Good Enough Daughter

      Alix Kates Shulman

      An honest, unflinching reflection on the meaning of family, from the author of the bestselling novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen
      Alix Kates Shulman wasn’t looking forward to helping her aging parents clean out their house and prepare for the final years of their lives. She had fled suburban Cleveland at age twenty to carve out her own life in New York City. But as she began dismantling their house of forty years, the task evolved into a precious learning experience she would never forget. Shulman discovers the lives of two colorful, vibrant people from whom she remained distant while pursuing a literary career. She finds herself grappling with regret and seeking redemption in the search for what it means to be a good daughter. With warmth and insight, Shulman sheds light on a complex, painful event that many adults eventually face—the final trip home.

    • The Demon Lover by Robin Morgan

      The Demon Lover

      Robin Morgan

      A riveting exploration of terrorism’s relationship to sex, with a new preface by the author

      Terrorism is the international crime that has captured the attention of the entire world, forcing governments to make radical changes in security and civil liberties. Meanwhile, everyone tries to comprehend the real reasons that inspire such violence.

      This is where political philosopher Robin Morgan begins The Demon Lover, a groundbreaking work of investigative journalism and a bestseller in the print edition. Through her globe-spanning examination of terrorism, Morgan unearths the roots of the phenomenon. With wide-ranging research across historical eras and a three-hundred-sixty-degree approach, she examines how violence has become eroticized—and conflated with masculinity—to the lethal detriment of both women and men.

      Recent scientific studies referenced in the preface to this edition prove just how ahead of her time Morgan has been with her analysis. Her account of her own personal experience with militant tactics adopted by US radicals in the 1960s and 1970s is extraordinary, and her reports on and interviews with Palestinian women in the refugee camps of the Middle East—women confiding for the first time, as women, details of their lives under terrorism every day—are deeply moving. Morgan also offers a compelling vision of hope for change, and an afterword includes her famous “Letters from Ground Zero,” written after 9/11.

      The Demon Lover is Robin Morgan at her most intelligent and unforgettable.

    • The Word of a Woman by Robin Morgan

      The Word of a Woman

      Robin Morgan

      Feminism from the front lines

      A founder of the contemporary global women’s movement, Robin Morgan is widely known as one of feminism’s strongest, most persuasive activists. As a writer, she is unique in her ability to distill ideas into smart pieces of nonfiction that can transform a reader’s worldview forever.

      The Word of a Woman follows Morgan’s journalism and shorter prose from the 1960s through the early 1990s. Originally published in 1992, this second edition adds five new essays. An annotated version of her famous, fiery “Goodbye to All That” is here, as are essays that expose the connections between violence against women and pornography, explain the effects of female genital mutilation, and show how sexism and racism are intimately connected. She tells inside stories about having organized the first Miss America Pageant protest, writes poignantly about being a feminist raising a son, and pens a letter to be read one thousand years in the future. She reports on her work with Palestinian women in the Gaza Strip, with Filipina prostitutes in South Asia, and with village women in South Africa—and celebrates finding indigenous feminism wherever she goes. Morgan unveils creative, visionary yet pragmatic ways for women to unite, regardless of barriers. Her message of defiant hope will inspire any woman—and man—who reads it.

    • The Anatomy of Freedom by Robin Morgan

      The Anatomy of Freedom

      Robin Morgan

      The classic of feminist vision by one of its greatest writers, with a new preface by the author

      With the advent of Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, physics and our world changed forever. In The Anatomy of Freedom, Robin Morgan shows us how the empowerment of women—half of humanity—will have the same transformative power for society that e=mc2 had for the physical world.

      This is not simply another feminist treatise. Morgan looks beyond the women’s movement as a crucial struggle for equal rights; she sees this process as the fundamental motor for freeing both women and men, and as a necessity for the survival of sentient life and of the planet itself. She explains and demystifies theoretical physics in accessible terms and, astonishingly, uses it as a prism through which to view the equation of relationships and gender, while going deep into the subconscious and plumbing the roots of passion. At the same time, she makes vital connections between these internal realities and global issues of the environment, economics, and family.

      There has perhaps never been a book more daring. The Anatomy of Freedom shows a master at her peak.

    • Skin by Dorothy Allison
      A collection of critical essays from award-winning author Dorothy Allison about identity, gender politics, and queer theory, now with a new preface
      Lambda Award and American Library Association’s Stonewall Book Award–winning author Dorothy Allison is known for her bold and insightful writing on issues of class and sexuality. In Skin, she approaches these topics through twenty-three impassioned essays that explore her identity—from her childhood in a poor family in South Carolina to her adult life as a lesbian in the suburbs of New York—and her sexuality. In “Gun Crazy,” Allison delves into what guns meant to the men and women around her when she was growing up. She gives insight into the importance of speaking professionally about sexuality in “Talking to Straight People,” and articulates the danger women feel about revealing their personal desires, even within feminist communities, in “Public Silence, Private Terror.” Allison is fearless in her discussion of many social and political taboos. Compelling and raw, Skin is an honest and intimate work—perfect for Dorothy Allison fans and new readers alike.
    • Tempted Women by Carol Botwin

      Tempted Women

      Carol Botwin

      Over the past ten years, the number of wives who have affairs has grown dramatically—recent surveys suggest by as much as 50 percent. Yet in all the acres of space devoted to male infidelity, so far this has been a largely untouched subject. In this guide, Carol Botwin—advice columnist, therapist, and author—rushes to help rather than condemn. Drawing from six hundred interviews and case histories—with both husbands and wives—Botwin examines causes, initial attractions, affairs in progress, endings, and aftermaths. Throughout, she offers her experienced advice and solutions on how to deal with a lover, children, and husband after the affair has dealt a devastating blow to the marriage. Other books by the author include Men Who Can’t be Faithful and Is There Sex After Marriage?

    • Sex and the Single Girl by Helen Gurley Brown

      Sex and the Single Girl

      Helen Gurley Brown

      The trailblazing book that jump-started the sexual revolutionHelen Gurley Brown, the iconic editor in chief of Cosmopolitan for thirty-two years, is considered one of the most influential figures of Second Wave feminism. Her first book sold millions of copies, became a cultural phenomenon, and ushered in a whole new way of thinking about work, men, and life. Feisty, fun, and totally frank, Sex and the Single Girl offers advice to unmarried women that is as relevant today as it was when it burst onto the scene in the 1960s. This spirited manifesto puts women—and what they want—first. It captures the exuberance, optimism, and independence that have influenced the lives of so many contemporary American women.

    • Sex and the Office by Helen Gurley Brown

      Sex and the Office

      Helen Gurley Brown

      Helen Gurley Brown adds dazzle to dull office days in her follow-up to the phenomenal bestseller Sex and the Single Girl The classic book from 1965 tells what it was really like to be the girl in a Mad Men–style workplace. Sex and the Office became the definitive, comprehensive guide to working life for an entire generation of women. Alongside advice about how to deal with your boss, manage office politics, and make the most of personal and professional opportunities in the office, Helen Gurley Brown also shares stories from her own office days. A classic of its time, this stands as a frank look at how to get ahead, not just through working hard but through playing hard, too.

    • Femininity by Susan Brownmiller

      Femininity

      Susan Brownmiller

      With intelligence and humor, Susan Brownmiller explores the history and unspoken rules of the burden of “feminine perfection”
      What is femininity? How is it measured? What are its demands? How are women meant to dress, look, think, act, feel, and be, according to the mores of society?
      Susan Brownmiller offers a witty and often pointed critique of the concept of femininity in contemporary culture and throughout history. She explores the demands placed upon women to fit an established mold, examines female stereotypes, and celebrates the hard-won advances in women’s lifestyle and attire. At once profound, revolutionary, empowering, and entertaining, Femininity challenges the accepted female norm while appreciating the women throughout history who have courageously broken free of its constraints.
    • Against Our Will by Susan Brownmiller

      Against Our Will

      Susan Brownmiller

      Susan Brownmiller’s groundbreaking bestseller uncovers the culture of violence against women with a devastating exploration of the history of rape—now with a new preface by the author exposing the undercurrents of rape still present today
      Rape, as author Susan Brownmiller proves in her startling and important book, is not about sex but about power, fear, and subjugation. For thousands of years, it has been viewed as an acceptable “spoil of war,” used as a weapon by invading armies to crush the will of the conquered. The act of rape against women has long been cloaked in lies and false justifications.
      It is ignored, tolerated, even encouraged by governments and military leaders, misunderstood by police and security organizations, freely employed by domineering husbands and lovers, downplayed by medical and legal professionals more inclined to “blame the victim,” and, perhaps most shockingly, accepted in supposedly civilized societies worldwide, including the United States.
      Against Our Will is a classic work that has been widely credited with changing prevailing attitudes about violence against women by awakening the public to the true and continuing tragedy of rape around the globe and throughout the ages.
      Selected by the New York Times Book Review as an Outstanding Book of the Year and included among the New York Public Library’s Books of the Century, Against Our Will remains an essential work of sociological and historical importance.

    • The Ethics of Ambiguity by Simone de Beauvoir

      The Ethics of Ambiguity

      Simone de Beauvoir

      From the groundbreaking author of The Second Sex comes a radical argument for ethical responsibility and freedom.

      In this classic introduction to existentialist thought, French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity simultaneously pays homage to and grapples with her French contemporaries, philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, by arguing that the freedoms in existentialism carry with them certain ethical responsibilities. De Beauvoir outlines a series of “ways of being” (the adventurer, the passionate person, the lover, the artist, and the intellectual), each of which overcomes the former’s deficiencies, and therefore can live up to the responsibilities of freedom. Ultimately, de Beauvoir argues that in order to achieve true freedom, one must battle against the choices and activities of those who suppress it.
      The Ethics of Ambiguity is the book that launched Simone de Beauvoir’s feminist and existential philosophy. It remains a concise yet thorough examination of existence and what it means to be human.
    • Marriage Is a Bad Habit by Ruth Dickson

      Marriage Is a Bad Habit

      Ruth Dickson

      When Ruth Dickson released her 1967 book Married Men Make the Best Lovers, it went off like a bombshell. Defenders of the “sanctity” of marriage rose up to dismiss her frank, innovative, thoroughly researched book. But why? Why cling to the broken ritual of marriage? What comfort is there in a crumbling institution held together by meaningless tradition and out of touch patriarchy?

      In this thoughtful follow-up, Dickson examines marriage itself. As she explains, “It’s no secret that the divorce rate is reaching astronomical proportions, yet nobody seems to do anything about the sole cause of divorce: marriage.”

      Expertly weaving historical research, personal anecdotes, and scalpel-sharp philosophy, Marriage Is a Bad Habit makes the case that a life without marriage is a life of freedom—a woman’s freedom from male dominance and abuse, a man’s freedom from female resentment and martyrdom. In this new world it’s time for the sexes to find a new way of living together. Or, more specifically, a new way to live apart.

      Sexier than Helen Gurley Brown, wittier than Xaviera Hollander, Ruth Dickson tells the truth, makes you laugh, gives you innovative ideas and thoughtful advice on how to navigate the tricky waters of true freedom of choice.
    • The Maria Paradox by Carmen Inoa Vazquez

      The Maria Paradox

      Carmen Inoa Vazquez

      In a lively, anecdotal manner, the authors show how to balance old-world values with contemporary North America, whether the issue is juggling career and family demands, turning the traditional marriage into a partnership, awakening and accepting one’s own sexuality, seeking help with emotional problems outside the family, or learning to stand up for one’s feelings and rights.

      Filled with real-life success stories and wise, compassionate advice, The Maria Paradox details how any Latina can enjoy the best of both worlds and become her own person at last.

    •  by
      • Buy it from:
    •  by
      • Buy it from:
    • Why I Wore Lipstick to My Mastectomy by Geralyn Lucas

      Why I Wore Lipstick to My Mastectomy

      Geralyn Lucas

      Having recently graduated from Columbia Journalism School and landed her dream job at 20/20, the last thing twenty-seven-year-old Geralyn expects to hear is a breast cancer diagnosis. And there is one part of the diagnosis that no one will discuss with her: what it means to be a young woman with cancer in a beauty-obsessed culture. Trying to find herself while losing her vibrancy and her looks, Geralyn embarks on a road of self-acceptance that will inspire all women. Although her story is explicitly about a period of time when she was driven by fear and uncertainty, Geralyn managed a transformation that will encourage all women under siege to discover their own courage and beauty. The important and outrageous lessons of Why I Wore Lipstick come fast and furious with the same gusto that Geralyn has learned to bring to every aspect of her life.

    • Domestic Affairs by Joyce Maynard

      Domestic Affairs

      Joyce Maynard

      An unforgettable collection of essays on the everyday thrills and challenges of marriage and motherhood, from one of America’s best-loved memoirists
      Witty and insightful, Domestic Affairs is an extension of Joyce Maynard’s celebrated, widely syndicated newspaper column of the same name that ran from 1984 to 1990. Each essay gives an unfiltered look at the ups and downs of family life and a remarkable window into the challenges of modern motherhood. Topics range from babysitter woes to family visits to coping with a child’s burgeoning independence. These collected writings represent nine years’ worth of stories about the greatest adventure of Maynard’s life, or, as she writes, “the difficult, exhausting, humbling, and endlessly gratifying business of raising children, of ensuring the health of both body and soul.” This ebook features an illustrated biography of Joyce Maynard including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Bitching by Marion Meade

      Bitching

      Marion Meade

      In the early 1970s, the national conversation regarding feminism was very different. Public discussions of womanhood—single life, marriage, workplace harassment, rights, gripes—were often channeled through movement spokeswomen and always refracted through the lens of talking to men about men. Little was shared about the chats happening behind closed doors where everyday women talked to women without the threat of men listening in. But, all that changed with the book Bitching.

      Originally published in 1973, Bitching is journalist and author Marion Meade’s deep and insightful investigation into the real dialogue happening inside coffee klatches, consciousness-raising groups, and therapist’s sessions. Using excerpts from real taped conversations, Meade presents the frustration, anger, resigned acceptance, and scathing humor that make up the female experience from birth to grave.

      For the first time, male chauvinist behavior goes fully examined and unexcused, and the roles men force upon women get broken down to their sometimes ridiculous component parts. A snapshot into a key time in the feminist movement, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in how far we have come . . . or how much we have stayed the same.

    • A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays by Alix Kates Shulman

      A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays

      Alix Kates Shulman

      A provocative collection of essays by one of the foremost thinkers of second-wave feminism
      In a career spanning four decades, Alix Kates Shulman has written on issues ranging from marriage, sex, and divorce to religious identity, age, and family devotion. Throughout her diverse body of work runs a staunch advocacy of equal rights and social justice. Beginning with her provocative essay “A Marriage Agreement,” written in 1969, and continuing through to the heartrending “Caring for an Ill Spouse, and Other Caregivers,” written in 2011, this collection provides a window into the social movements that defined an era. Witty, stirring, and poignant, A Marriage Agreement and Other Essays illustrates how each generation, in Shulman’s words, “can do no more than add its bit to the endless river of consciousness and change.”

    • Moving Beyond Words by Gloria Steinem

      Moving Beyond Words

      Gloria Steinem

      Steinem’s career-spanning collection of essays—each one a book in itself—re-imagine everything from the masculinization of wealth to Freudian thought and aging
      With cool humor and rich intellect, Gloria Steinem strips bare our social constructions of gender and race, explaining just how limiting these invented cultural identities can be. In the first of six sections, Steinem imagines how our understanding of human psychology would be different in a witty reversal: What if Freud had been a woman who inflicted biological inferiority on men (think “womb envy”)? In other essays, the author presents positive examples of people who turn stereotypes on their heads, from a female bodybuilder to Mahatma Gandhi, whose followers absorbed his wisdom that change starts at the bottom. And in some of the most moving pieces, Steinem reveals something of her own complicated history as a writer, woman, and citizen of the world.
    • Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions by Gloria Steinem

      Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions

      Gloria Steinem

      This New York Times–bestselling feminist classic remains as fresh and relevant in our current climate as when it was first published.

      Covering two decades—from the early sixties to the early eighties—the pieces in Gloria Steinem’s diverse, stimulating, and often-prescient first collection dare to ask how our world might change for the better if we each behaved “as if everyone mattered.” Steinem’s experiences on the front lines of the women’s movement chart her own consciousness-raising and serve as a metaphor for the evolution of feminist politics and social change.

      An early assignment as a “girl reporter,” going undercover as a Bunny in the Playboy Club, becomes an eye-opening exposé of appalling work conditions and sexual harassment. In many of the pieces that follow, Steinem challenges the practices and preconceptions that marginalize, exclude, exploit, and victimize women.

      Steinem understands that the political is always personal, and vice versa, and so her writings range from the polemical—“Erotica vs. Pornography” and “The Politics of Food”—to the deeply personal—“Ruth’s Song,” a moving tribute to her mentally ill mother—to sharp satire—“If Men Could Menstruate.” One of the first to address topics such as female genital mutilation and transgenderism, Steinem has truly earned the right to be called a feminist pioneer, and this collection is both a testament to her legacy in the fight for equality and an entertaining, thought-provoking journey through the lives of modern women.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Gloria Steinem including rare images from the author’s personal collection.

    • Doing Sixty & Seventy by Gloria Steinem

      Doing Sixty & Seventy

      Gloria Steinem

      A powerful and moving treatise on the surprises of aging from an influential feminist writer and activist who thinks beyond stereotypes
      The older I get, the more intensely I feel about the world around me.

      Gloria Steinem has been an eloquent and outspoken voice for women’s rights and equality for more than four decades. In Doing Sixty & Seventy she addresses an essential concern of people everywhere—and especially of women: the issue of aging. Whereas turning fifty, in her experience, is “leaving a much-loved and familiar country,” turning sixty means “arriving at the border of a new one.” With insight, intelligence, wit, and heartfelt honesty, she explores the landscapes of this new country and celebrates what she has called “the greatest adventure of our lives.”
      While appreciating everybody’s experiences as different, Steinem sees these years as charged with possibilities. Dealing with stereotypes and the “invisibility” that often accompany a woman’s senior years can be as liberating as it is frustrating. It frees women as well as men to embrace that “full, glorious, alive-in-the-moment, don’t-give-a-damn yet caring-for-everything sense of the right now.”
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Gloria Steinem including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
    • Revolution from Within by Gloria Steinem

      Revolution from Within

      Gloria Steinem

      “Without self-esteem, the only change is an exchange of masters; with it, there is no need for masters.” —Gloria Steinem When trying to find books to give to “the countless brave and smart women I met who didn’t think of themselves as either brave or smart,” Gloria Steinem realized that books either supposed that external political change would cure everything or that internal change would. None linked internal and external change together in a seamless circle of cause and effect, effect and cause. She undertook to write such a book, and ended up transforming herself as well as others. The result of her external plus internal reflection is this bestselling and truly transforming book: part collection of personal stories from her own life and the lives of many others, part revolutionary guide to finding community and inspiration. Steinem finds role models in a very young and uncertain Gandhi as well as unlikely heroes from the streets to history. Revolution from Within addresses the core issues of self-authority and unjust external authority, and argues that the first is necessary to transform the second.
    • In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens by Alice Walker

      In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens

      Alice Walker

      Walker’s collection of early nonfiction serves as the manifesto of a young artist—and an illuminating self-portrait

      What is a womanist? Alice Walker sets out to define the concept in this anthology of early essays and other nonfiction pieces. As she outlines it, a womanist is a person who prefers to side with the oppressed: with women, with people of color, with the poor. As a writer, Walker has always taken such people as her primary subjects, and her search for paths toward self-possession and freedom always holds out hope for the transformative power of compassion and love. Whether she’s taking on nuclear proliferation, the promise and problems of the civil rights movement, or her own creative process, Walker always brings to bear a fearless determination to tell the truth.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • The Sexual Education of a Beauty Queen by Taylor Marsh

      The Sexual Education of a Beauty Queen

      Taylor Marsh

      The Sexual Education of a Beauty Queen is at once memoir, commentary, enlightenment, and a little dose of self-help. Taylor Marsh was Miss Missouri and performed on Broadway, hosted a radio show, and starred in a one-woman show. She was also a relationship consultant for the nation’s largest newsweekly, edited the web’s first megasuccessful women-owned and -operated soft-core pornography site, worked as a phone-sex actress, and studied sexuality and relationships for years. She’s been single, a girlfriend, a mistress, and a wife. She has the inside track to what men want, what women need, and how we all tend to muck it up. As a political commentator and popular writer, Taylor is intelligent and inspiring. She blends personal experience, pop culture, and the politics of sex in an entertaining, engaging, and inspiring read.

    • Wounded to Death by Serena Dandini

      Wounded to Death

      Serena Dandini

      The voices too many women have lost; the dreams too many men have destroyed

      In these monologues originally written for theatrical performance, women who were victims of murder regain their voices to tell their truths. One woman, her body unceremoniously dumped in a well by her husband, laments the police force’s halfhearted investigation of her murder. Another, forced to toil ceaselessly for a meager few euros per month, grows weary of enduring daily beatings and attempted rape and hangs herself from a crystal chandelier. Inspired by true events, these monologues represent what the victims of femicide might say, had they not been robbed of their voices.

      First staged as a play in 2012 in Palermo, Italy, Wounded to Death has taken Italy and the world by storm. Alongside the powerfully imagined speeches in this edition, Serena Dandini presents the grim global statistics of violence against women. This essential book showcases the author’s exceptional capacity for creating nuanced emotion, from comic to painful, from grotesque to dramatic. With a factual basis and cinematic flair, these works compel the reader to consider the violence that is taking place right now all over the world.

    • The Wives by Alexandra Popoff

      Muses and editors, saviors and publishers: Meet the women behind the greatest works of Russian literature
      “Behind every good man is a good woman” is a common saying, but when it comes to literature, the relationship between spouses is even that much more complex. F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence used their marriages for literary inspiration and material, sometime at the expense of their spouses’ sanity. Thomas Carlyle wanted his wife to assist him, but Jane Carlyle became increasingly bitter and resentful in her new role, putting additional strain on their relationship. In Russian literary marriages, however, the wives of some of the most famous authors of all time did not resent taking a “secondary position,” although to call their position secondary does not do justice to the vital role these women played in the creation of some of the greatest literary works in history. From Sophia Tolstoy to Véra Nabokov, Elena Bulgakov, Nadezdha Mandelstam, Anna Dostevsky, and Natalya Solzhenitsyn, these women ranged from stenographers and typists to editors, researchers, translators, and even publishers. Living under restrictive regimes, many of these women battled censorship and preserved the writers’ illicit archives, often risking their own lives to do so. They established a tradition all their own, unmatched in the West. Many of these women were the writers’ intellectual companions and made invaluable contributions to the creative process. And their husbands knew it. Leo Tolstoy made no secret of Sofia’s involvement in War and Peace in his letters, and Vladimir Nabokov referred to Véra as his own “single shadow.”

    • Diane Arbus by Patricia Bosworth

      Diane Arbus

      Patricia Bosworth

      Bosworth’s remarkable look at the life of Diane Arbus, one of the most acclaimed and provocative photographers of her time Diane Arbus became famous for her intimate and unconventional portraits of twins, dwarfs, sideshow performers, eccentrics, and everyday “freaks.” Condemned by some for voyeurism, praised by others for compassion, she was nonetheless a transformative figure in twentieth-century photography and hailed by all for her undeniable genius. Her life was cut short when she committed suicide in 1971 at the peak of her career. In the first complete biography of Arbus, author Patricia Bosworth traces the arc of Arbus’s remarkable life: her sheltered upper-class childhood and passionate, all-consuming marriage to Allan Arbus; her roles as wife and devoted mother; and her evolution from fashion photographer to critically acclaimed artist—one who forever altered the boundaries of photography.
    • Marlene by Marlene Dietrich

      A fascinating self-portrait of one of the greatest entertainers of Hollywood’s golden age

      Film star. Cabaret sensation. Recording artist. Writer. Marlene Dietrich was nothing short of enchanting—and remains so as she chronicles her fabulous rise to stardom in Marlene. From her early career in Germany as a chorus girl to her breakout role as Lola in The Blue Angel to her courageous wartime tours, Dietrich recounts a life that captivates on the page just as she smoldered on the screen. She writes passionately of her friends—including Charlie Chaplin, Orson Welles, and Edith Piaf, among many others—and she shares memories of what she calls her greatest accomplishment: entertaining the Allied troops during World War II. A sustained expression of her bold, sophisticated style, Marlene reminds us why Dietrich remains an international icon and a true Hollywood legend.

    • Virginia Woolf by Ruth Gruber

      Virginia Woolf

      Ruth Gruber

      Gruber’s groundbreaking study of the work and legacy of Virginia Woolf—an enduring feminist analysis pairing two of the twentieth century’s most extraordinary writers
      In 1932, Ruth Gruber earned her PhD—the youngest person ever to do so—with a stunning doctoral dissertation on Virginia Woolf. Published in 1935, the paper was the first-ever feminist critique of Woolf’s work and inspired a series of correspondences between the two writers. It also led to Gruber’s eventual meeting with Woolf, which she recounted six decades later in Virginia Woolf: The Will to Create as a Woman. Described by Gruber as “the odyssey of how I met Virginia Woolf, and how her life and work became intertwined with my life,” Virginia Woolf is a clear and insightful portrait of one of modern literature’s most innovative authors, written by one of America’s most remarkable journalists.
    • Goodbye Natalie, Goodbye Splendour by Marti Rulli

      Goodbye Natalie, Goodbye Splendour

      Marti Rulli

      Instrumental in getting the case reopened in 2011, Goodbye Natalie, Goodbye Splendour is the long-awaited, detailed account of events that led to the mysterious death of Hollywood legend Natalie Wood off the coast of Catalina Island on November 28, 1981. It is a story told by a haunted witness to that fateful evening: Dennis Davern, the young captain of Splendour, the yacht belonging to Wood and husband Robert Wagner. Davern initially backed up Wagner’s version of that evening’s events through a signed statement prepared by attorneys. But Davern’s guilt over failing Natalie tormented him.

      Davern reached out to his old friend Marti Rulli, and little by little, at his own emotional pace, he revealed the details of his years in Wood’s employ, of the fateful weekend that Natalie died, and of the events following her death that prevented him from telling the whole story—until now.

    • Marilyn by Gloria Steinem
      Gloria Steinem’s insightful and uniquely sensitive account of Hollywood’s brightest star from the Golden Age
      Few books have altered the perception of a celebrity as much as Marilyn. Gloria Steinem reveals that behind the familiar sex symbol lay a tortured spirit with powerful charisma, intelligence, and complexity. The book delves into a topic many other writers have ignored—that of Norma Jeane, the young girl who grew up with an unstable mother, constant shuffling between foster homes, and abuse. Steinem evocatively recreates that world, connecting it to the fragile adult persona of Marilyn Monroe. Her compelling text draws on a long, private interview Monroe gave to photographer George Barris, part of an intended joint project begun during Monroe’s last summer. Steinem’s Marilyn also includes Barris’s extraordinary portraits of Monroe, taken just weeks before the star’s death.
    • Goddess by Anthony Summers
      New York Times Bestseller: The definitive biography based on over six hundred interviews with people who knew Marilyn Monroe both professionally and intimately.

      Marilyn Monroe, born in obscurity and deprivation, became an actress and legend of the twentieth century, romantically linked to famous men from Joe DiMaggio to Arthur Miller to John F. Kennedy. But her tragic death at a young age, under suspicious circumstances, left behind a mystery that remains unsolved to this day.

      Anthony Summers interviewed more than six hundred people, laying bare the truths—sometimes funny, often sad—about this brilliant, troubled woman. The first to gain access to the files of Monroe’s last psychiatrist, Summers uses the documents to explain her tangled psyche and her dangerous addiction to medications. He establishes, after years of mere rumor, that President Kennedy and his brother Robert were both intimately involved with Monroe in life—and in covering up the circumstances of her death.

      Written by a Pulitzer Prize nominee who has authored works on JFK, J. Edgar Hoover, and the 9/11 attacks, this investigation of an iconic star’s brief life and early death is “remarkable. . . . The ghost of Marilyn Monroe cries out in these pages” (The New York Times).
    • Family Memories by Rebecca West

      Family Memories

      Rebecca West

      Published posthumously, this wise and entertaining family history and memoir offers keen insight into the origins of Rebecca West and her work
      Working on Family Memories for over twenty years, West set out to narrate the story of her mother’s, father’s and husband’s unique and talented families. As in her novels, the richly drawn characters of her heritage and childhood traverse a diverse landscape, from Scotland to Australia to Africa, encountering love, loss, and a panoply of challenges. Although fans will recognize many settings, characters, and themes from her novels, West’s exploration of her family stands on its own as an engaging narrative. Told with her compelling voice, West’s chronicles reflect not only the importance of family to identity, but to the way one relates to the larger world.

    • Queens Consort by Lisa Hilton

      Queens Consort

      Lisa Hilton

      Meet the subjects of history’s greatest dramas: the first queens of England
      Though their royal husbands occupy the lion’s share of history books, the queens of early England are fascinating subjects in their own right. Lisa Hilton’s Queens Consort vividly evokes the lives and times of England’s first queens, from Matilda of Flanders and the Norman conquest of England to Elizabeth of York and the beginning of the Tudor dynasty. By profiling twenty different queens, Hilton provides an intricate and dramatic composite of the English monarch: from the ruthless Isabella of France, who violently gained control of England by dispatching Edward II, to the beloved Matilda of Scotland, known for her intelligence and devotion despite her philandering husband, Henry I; and from a girl who was crowned at the age of nine to a commoner who climbed the social ladder at the most opportune moment. Queens Consort dispels many of the myths that have surrounded these women for centuries, while simultaneously illuminating lesser-known facts about their lives.
    • If Nuns Ruled the World by Jo Piazza

      If Nuns Ruled the World

      Jo Piazza

      “Fascinating profiles” of remarkable nuns, from an eighty-three-year-old Ironman champion to a crusader against human trafficking (Daily News [New York]).

      “In an age of villainy, war and inequality, it makes sense that we need superheroes,” writes Nicholas Kristof of The New York Times. “And after trying Superman, Batman and Spider-Man, we may have found the best superheroes yet: Nuns.”

      In If Nuns Ruled the World, veteran reporter Jo Piazza overthrows the popular perception of nuns as killjoy schoolmarms, instead revealing them as the most vigorous catalysts of change in an otherwise repressive society.

      Meet Sister Simone Campbell, who traversed the United States challenging a Congressional budget that threatened to severely undermine the well-being of poor Americans; Sister Megan Rice, who is willing to spend the rest of her life in prison if it helps eliminate nuclear weapons; and the inimitable Sister Jeannine Gramick, who is fighting for acceptance of gays and lesbians in the Catholic Church.

      During a time when American nuns are often under attack from the very institution to which they devote their lives—and the values of the institution itself are hotly debated—these sisters offer thought-provoking and inspiring stories. As the Daily Beast put it, “Anybody looking to argue there is a place for Catholicism in the modern world should just stand on a street corner handing out Piazza’s book.”
    • Imperial Woman by Pearl S. Buck

      Imperial Woman

      Pearl S. Buck

      Pearl S. Buck’s remarkable account of the life of Tzu Hsi, the magnetic and fierce-minded woman from humble origins who became China’s last empress
      In Imperial Woman, Pearl S. Buck brings to life the amazing story of Tzu Hsi, who rose from concubine status to become the working head of the Qing Dynasty. Born from a humble background, Tzu Hsi falls in love with her cousin Jung Lu, a handsome guard—but while still a teenager she is selected, along with her sister and hundreds of other girls, for relocation to the Forbidden City. Already set apart on account of her beauty, she’s determined to be the emperor’s favorite, and devotes all of her talent and cunning to the task. When the emperor dies, she finds herself in a role of supreme power, one she’ll command for nearly fifty years. Much has been written about Tzu Hsi, but no other novel recreates her life—the extraordinary personality, together with the world of court intrigue and the period of national turmoil with which she dealt—as well as Imperial Woman. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Raquela by Ruth Gruber

      Raquela

      Ruth Gruber

      A National Jewish Book Award–winning biography: A look at the early years of Israel’s statehood, experienced through the life of a pioneering nurse.

      During her extraordinary career, nurse Raquela Prywes was a witness to history. She delivered babies in a Holocaust refugee camp and on the Israeli frontier. She crossed minefields to aid injured soldiers in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War and organized hospitals to save the lives of those fighting the 1967 Six-Day War. Along the way, her own life was a series of triumphs and tragedies mirroring those of the newly formed Jewish state.

      Raquela is a moving tribute to a remarkable woman, and an unforgettable chronicle of the birth of Israel through the eyes of those who lived it.
    • Kindred Souls by Edna P. Gurewitsch

      Kindred Souls

      Edna P. Gurewitsch

      The poignant and unforgettable true account of the deep, loving friendship between a handsome physician and the former First Lady, as seen on PBS’s The Roosevelts: An Intimate History
      “I love you as I love and have never loved anyone else.” —Eleanor Roosevelt in a letter to Dr. David Gurewitsch, 1955

      She was the most famous and admired woman in America. He was a strikingly handsome doctor, eighteen years her junior. Eleanor Roosevelt first met David Gurewitsch in 1944. He was making a house call to a patient when the door opened to reveal the wife of the president of the United States, who had come to help her sick friend. A year later, Gurewitsch was Mrs. Roosevelt’s personal physician, on his way to becoming the great lady’s dearest companion—a relationship that would endure until Mrs. Roosevelt’s death in 1962. Recounting the details of this remarkable union is an intimately involved chronicler: Gurewitsch’s wife, Edna.

      Kindred Souls is a rare love story—the tale of a friendship between two extraordinary people, based on trust, exchange of confidences, and profound interest in and respect for each other’s work. With perceptiveness, compassion, admiration, and deep affection, the author recalls the final decade and a half of the former First Lady’s exceptional life, from her first encounter with the man who would become Mrs. Gurewitsch’s husband through the blossoming of a unique bond and platonic love.

      Blended into her tender reminiscences are excerpts from the enduring correspondence between Dr. Gurewitsch and the First Lady, and a collection of personal photographs of the Gurewitsch and Roosevelt families. The result is a revealing portrait of one of the twentieth century’s most beloved icons in the last years of her life—a woman whom the author warmly praises as “one of the few people in this world in which greatness and modesty could coexist.”
    • The Soong Sisters by Emily Hahn

      The Soong Sisters

      Emily Hahn

      In the early twentieth century, few women in China were to prove so important to the rise of Chinese nationalism and liberation from tradition as the three extraordinary Soong Sisters: Eling, Chingling and Mayling. As told with wit and verve by Emily Hahn, a remarkable woman in her own right, the biography of the Soong Sisters tells the story of China through both world wars. It also chronicles the changes to Shanghai as they relate to a very eccentric family that had the courage to speak out against the ruling regime. Greatly influencing the history of modern China, they interacted with their government and military to protect the lives of those who could not be heard, and they appealed to the West to support China during the Japanese invasion.

    • The Search for an Abortionist by Nancy Howell Lee

      The Search for an Abortionist

      Nancy Howell Lee

      This eye-opening look at the abortion process prior to the Supreme Court’s landmark Roe v. Wade decision of 1973 is now more relevant than ever, with a new introduction by the author revisiting history that is still salient half a century later

      In the years before Roe v. Wade, women seeking to end their unwanted pregnancies had limited options—many of them dangerous, even potentially fatal, and nearly all of them illegal. This groundbreaking work by sociologist Nancy Howell Lee, first published in 1969, takes an intimate look at the entire abortion process—from the initial decision to terminate a pregnancy through the procedure itself and the aftermath—providing an incomparable view of what is still one of the most controversial and divisive issues in America.

      Based on interviews with one hundred fourteen women who had illegal abortions, Howell Lee’s book reveals how the abortions were procured and paid for, and looks at the lasting effects the experience had on the participants. The interviewees were open and honest about what influenced their decisions, how they conducted their search for someone to perform the procedure, and the physical and emotional aftereffects. With many state governments across America currently passing new legislation that restricts and, in many cases, effectively bans abortion, an eventual return to the pre-Roe days threatens the well-being of millions of women, making Nancy Howell Lee’s pioneering study more relevant than ever. It is a must-read for all those interested in reproductive rights issues.
    • Madame Blavatsky by Marion Meade

      Madame Blavatsky

      Marion Meade

      Recklessly brilliant, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky scandalized her 19th century world with a controversial new religion that tried to synthesize Eastern and Western philosophies. If her contemporaries saw her as a freak, a charlatan, and a snake oil salesman, she viewed herself as a special person born for great things. She firmly believed that it was her destiny to enlighten the world. Rebelliously breaking conventions, she was the antithesis of a pious religious leader. She cursed, smoked, overate, and needed to airbrush out certain inconvenient facts, like husbands, lovers, and a child.

      Marion Meade digs deep into Madame Blavatsky’s life from her birth in Russia among the aristocracy to a penniless exile in Europe, across the Atlantic to New York where she became the first Russian woman naturalized as an American citizen, and finally moving on to India where she established the international headquarters of the Theosophical Society in 1882. As she chased from continent to continent, she left in her aftermath a trail of enthralled followers and the ideas of Theosophy that endure to this day. While dismissed as a female messiah, her efforts laid the groundwork for the New Age movement, which sought to reconcile Eastern traditions with Western occultism. Her teachings entered the mainstream by creating new respect for the cultures and religions of the East—for Buddhism and Hinduism—and interest in meditation, yoga, gurus, and reincarnation.

      Madame Blavatsky was one of a kind. Here is her richly bizarre story told with compassion, insight, and an attempt to plumb the truth behind those astonishing accomplishments.

    • Free Woman by Marion Meade

      Free Woman

      Marion Meade

      Victoria Woodhull is a historical figure too often ignored and undervalued by historians. Although she never achieved political power, her actions and her presence on the political scene helped begin to change the way Americans thought about the right to vote, particularly women’s suffrage, and she set the stage for political emancipations to come throughout the twentieth century.

      Woodhull was a product of and a revolutionary within the socially conservative Victorian era, which predominated in the United States as much as it did in England. She was an anomaly within her time, an unlikely and unconventional woman. She came from a background of poverty and her careers prior to entering politics included fortune-telling, acting, being a stock broker, journalism, and lecturing on women’s rights. She ran for president of the United States in 1872. At that time, she had twice been divorced and she outraged even the feminists of her day by refusing to confine her campaign to the issue of women’s suffrage. She advocated a single sexual standard for men and women, legalization of prostitution, reform of the marriage and family institutions, and “free love.” She shocked a nation largely because her plain-speaking was designed to expose the endemic hypocrisy of “respectable” people in society.

      Marion Meade has created a vivid picture of the colorful figure that was Victoria Woodhull, but she also fully portrays the era in which she lived, in all of its truest and often most unflattering colors. She makes the 1870s read in many ways like the 1970s, not just because Victoria Woodhull was far ahead of her own time but also because many people in the present era are still culturally behind the times.

    • The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt by Philosophical Library

      The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt

      Philosophical Library

      Nearly five hundred sage observations from the “First Lady of the World”

      A role model for generations of women, Eleanor Roosevelt lent her passion, support, and life experience to humanitarian causes in the United States and abroad, making her a popular and influential figure of the twentieth century. Both as a first lady and as a public figure, Mrs. Roosevelt championed the poor, minorities, and women. Her work as a civil rights advocate resulted in the desegregation of the armed forces and the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Culling quotes from her books, letters, and articles, and also providing timelines, contextual explanations, and a reader’s guide, The Wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt offers a thorough and lasting tribute to a tireless and compassionate leader.
    • To the Barricades by Alix Kates Shulman

      To the Barricades

      Alix Kates Shulman

      The story of Emma Goldman, written by a leader of America’s second wave of feminism
      Writer, anarchist, revolutionary, feminist—Emma Goldman was all these things and more. She was a fiery advocate, taking bold stands on a wide range of issues including women’s rights, homosexuality, capitalism, and the military draft. Her tumultuous childhood in Tsarist Russia fostered her rebelliousness and emboldened her opposition to violent authority. Upon arriving in New York in 1885, Goldman found a home in the anarchist movement in the United States. She traveled the country to deliver lectures on anarchism, and was jailed for urging unemployed workers to demand the food they needed. Goldman also aggressively supported Margaret Sanger’s effort to educate women about birth control. Goldman was deported to Russia as fears of an anarchist revolution in the US grew. But back in her homeland, she didn’t find the socialist paradise of worker equality and empowerment she had hoped would take root after the Bolshevik Revolution. Disillusioned, she left the Soviet Union and traveled the world to write and agitate on behalf of her causes. Goldman’s radical legacy endures, revived during the Women’s Liberation Movement of the 1970s. Her story provides inspiration for any woman who ever wanted to make a difference in the world.

    • Red Emma Speaks by Alix Kates Shulman

      Red Emma Speaks

      Alix Kates Shulman

      A comprehensive collection of writings and lectures by one of twentieth-century America’s most important political activists, with two essays by editor Alix Kates Shulman, a leader of feminism’s second wave
      Emma Goldman’s fiery speeches and essays made her a household name in the early 1900s. Collected here are the most significant of her writings, supplemented with an essay on Goldman’s feminist politics and a short biography, both by bestselling author Alix Kates Shulman. Including both published and previously unpublished works, Red Emma Speaks is an important historical volume and a fascinating look at the life and times of a major early feminist figure.

    •  by
      • Buy it from:
    • The Hillary Effect by Taylor Marsh

      The Hillary Effect

      Taylor Marsh

      Spanning nearly two decades of American politics, The Hillary Effect is the provocative and insightful story of the first viable female presidential candidate in history to win a primary and do so in spite of her campaign team’s mistakes. It addresses the galvanizing impact that her loss represented for both women and men, in and out of Washington. And it revolves around media coverage that treated her differently as first lady, senator, and then presidential candidate—not only because she was a woman, but because she was Hillary Clinton.

      Candidly written by veteran political analyst Taylor Marsh, this is the view from a recovering partisan, someone whom the Washington Post called a “die hard Clintonite” in its profile of Hillary in 2008.

      The Hillary Effect began when Hillary, as first lady, dared to challenge China’s treatment of women. A countless number of women have benefited and will benefit from her presidential loss, the most famous of these being Sarah Palin (the Tea Party queen of 2010 and first female on a national Republican presidential ticket), who weaves throughout this story as the anti-Hillary. The Hillary Effect also sees Michele Bachmann as a player, as the first Republican female to win a straw poll, primary, or caucus.

      The male leads in this stunning tale are Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama (someone who turned out to be very different from candidate Obama), with David Plouffe and Mark Penn making appearances. The story includes a host of media personalities and their outlets, but also new-media and progressive voices, and famous names like Chris Matthews, Keith Olbermann, Sally Quinn, the late Tim Russert, Richard Wolffe, Laura Ingraham, Liz Cheney, Peggy Noonan, Maureen Dowd, Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, and even Bill O’Reilly, who offered Hillary the best interview she would do during the 2008 season.

      All of this is seen through the economic and political crises of today—health care, women’s individual freedoms, Afghanistan, women’s rise around the world, the debt-ceiling debate, tax cuts for the wealthy, Occupy Wall Street, and an American public disenchanted with both Republicans and Democrats.

Browse all our ebooks